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Lots has been written about states subsidizing electrification, but not as much about the states that are actively fighting it through penalties.

Indiana has a bill to impose a $150 penalty on electric vehicles, which not only would put it as one of the worst offenders on this list by itself, but when you add in the state's excise tax (which is based on retail price, resulting in an extra ~$100 a year based on the $10-15k premium paid for an electric versus gas), it's possibly the worst.

Here are the others, from Car & Driver:

Wyoming $50 2015 EV and PHEV
Colorado $50 2014 EV and PHEV
Virginia $64 2013 EV
Nebraska $75 2011 EV and PHEV
Missouri $75 2011 EV and PHEV
Washington $100 2013 EV
North Carolina $100 2014 EV
Idaho $150 2015 EV and PHEV, plus HEV ($100)
Georgia $200 2015 EV and PHEV ($300 for commercial use)
Michigan $100 2017 EV ($200 for heavy-duty) and PHEV (only 4 kWh or more, $30)
 

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What is that money used for? Offset reduced gas tax revenue's to maintain the roads? Or just a money grab?
 

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Here in Missouri, I have 3 Volts and I was asked to register them 3 different ways. :)

1 was with this extra charge - Which is how the law reads.

1 was as a normal car - no extra charge.

1 was as a straight electric.... And, they didn't charge me. :)
 

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Welcome Elemental. Haven't seen you post in a while.

I live in misery as well and have not paid the extra tax. I saw a list that specifically excluded the Volt.
 

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Welcome Elemental. Haven't seen you post in a while.

I live in misery as well and have not paid the extra tax. I saw a list that specifically excluded the Volt.
Thanks, glad to be back! :)
 

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And considering the financial condition Illinois is in I'm surprised they are not on this list, in fact they offer EV plates for $30 for TWO years. Regular plates are $102/year. Too bad the Volt doesn't qualify for the EL plates.

I figure that alone is worth about $7/month (savings) and at 11.5 cent's per kW (here in southern IL) a Tesla/Leaf owner can buy about 60 kW worth of electricity and drive about 200 miles a month for FREE.
 

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This seems really premature. There aren't enough EVs on the road yet to raise any significant revenue. I just looked up the number of EVs from my state, Massachusetts which is a CARB state with a $2500 rebate, the total number of EVs of all sorts is just 3353, BEVs are 1893 and PHEV+ (i.e. the Volt) are 801. If you've taxed them all at the Indiana rate that would be a lousy $500K. Most of those states aren't CARB states, Washington is but I don't think any of the others are, so they are likely to have much lower EV adobtion rates than MA so the revenue that they are going to raise will be even less, maybe enough to paint a crosswalk. Eventually there will have to be some other mechanism than the gas tax to pay for roads but that is probably 10 years in the future when EVs make up a significant percentage of the fleet.
 

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This seems really premature. There aren't enough EVs on the road yet to raise any significant revenue. I just looked up the number of EVs from my state, Massachusetts which is a CARB state with a $2500 rebate, the total number of EVs of all sorts is just 3353, BEVs are 1893 and PHEV+ (i.e. the Volt) are 801. If you've taxed them all at the Indiana rate that would be a lousy $500K. Most of those states aren't CARB states, Washington is but I don't think any of the others are, so they are likely to have much lower EV adobtion rates than MA so the revenue that they are going to raise will be even less, maybe enough to paint a crosswalk. Eventually there will have to be some other mechanism than the gas tax to pay for roads but that is probably 10 years in the future when EVs make up a significant percentage of the fleet.
PHEVs and BEVs are getting more miles and falling in price, so we can expect to have increasing sales, more EV miles per vehicle, and better fuel economy for PHEVs. On top of that, the Volt and Leaf have been on the market for over 6 years, the Model S for 4 years, and others for several years as well, which means that the number of used PEVs available is also increasing.

With a combination of more affluent buyers and value seekers with higher miles than the average, things could change very, very quickly. It's not the proportion of the fleet that matters, it's the proportion of the miles.

I just hope that state legislatures are ready to change road pricing, because fixed fees are not going to work.
 

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Lots has been written about states subsidizing electrification, but not as much about the states that are actively fighting it through penalties.

Indiana has a bill to impose a $150 penalty on electric vehicles, which not only would put it as one of the worst offenders on this list by itself, but when you add in the state's excise tax (which is based on retail price, resulting in an extra ~$100 a year based on the $10-15k premium paid for an electric versus gas), it's possibly the worst.
This is not a "penalty", the offenders here are that EVs do not pay road use tax making it unfair to drivers of ICEs. However, it doesn't seem like a way to encourage people to drive EVs.

This issue also applies to fuel efficient cars, as they also don't pay as much gas tax. The real issue is that cars are not billed appropriately for using highways, but honestly, cars cause almost no highway wear and tear (but do need to pay for construction and maintenance).

My guess is road taxes should be covered under local, state, and federal taxes and maybe the gas tax should be done away with. The reason it is attractive is it bills users who actually use the roads, but maybe that is no longer the right tact to use, as really, everyone uses the roads indirectly (if you buy anything it was shipped to you by road, rail, and possibly air or ship).

However, you will never get rid of a funding source, so basically we are stuck with whatever broken system we have unless you can get support for something better. The fixed fee, if reasonable, is more attractive to me than intrusive GPS monitoring of distance driven, but distance driven on roads is more fair metric.
 

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Please allow me to explain why Colorado should not be on a list of shame for creating an EV registration fee of $50 over other vehicles. I paid the $50. The state charging facility grants paid for the installation of a Level II charging station a few tenths of a mile from my condominium. I get free electricity every night that I take out my Volt. The bonus is about $0.50 per day or $150 per year. Despite the inconvenience of driving to the charger and picking-up my vehicle two hours later, I still earn a small incentive and do not pay very much in fuel excise tax on the 120 gallons of gasoline that I bought last year. Colorado is developing EV infrastructure and promoting wind and solar energy to reduce the carbon footprint. Furthermore, the Volt gets about 5 times greater fuel efficiency than all of the ICE vehicles that I park with at work.
 

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In Georgia, we started as an EV friendly state with a $2500 EV credit that was taken away by state legislation and replaced with a $200/yr fee for driving the EV. The fee far exceeds (almost double for me) what the average EV owner would have paid in the 'displaced' gas tax revenues. The part that bothers me the most is that we are already taxed by means of the electricity that we pay for to charge our cars! It is equivalent to paying taxes to purchase gasoline from gas stations, and then paying taxes to put it in the tank. Remember, this $200 EV tax in Georgia is in addition to the ad valorem tax and $20 annual tag fee.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
How are these penalties exactly?
Let's do Indiana:
2017 Volt:
$33k -> $2,310 sales tax, spread over 5 years = $462/yr
$1,533 excise tax over first 5 years = $307/yr
3.14 mpkwh, 15k mi/yr = 4,777 kwh = $38 electricity tax
$150 EV surcharge
Total = $957/yr

2017 Cruze (identical gas car):
$17k -> $1,190 sales tax, spread over 5 years = $238
$792 excise tax over first 5 years = $158/yr
35mpg, 15k mi/yr = 428.6gal = $120 gas tax
Total = $516/yr
 

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Colorado has a very healthy tax credit of $6000 when you buy so with the $50 a year extra they charge me for driving it they'll get all their money back in 120 years. :)
 

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In Virginia we narrowly avoided some potentially nasty penalties. Initially the intent seemed to be to offset the infrastructure repair revenue lost from reduced gas sales...which I don't really have a problem with since I still use the road. But some poor writing and riders on the bills would have left EV (and some hybrid) owners wide open for unfair taxation.

The bills in question went back to be scrapped or seriously re-written so we'll see what the new legislative session comes up with.
 

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In Virginia we narrowly avoided some potentially nasty penalties. Initially the intent seemed to be to offset the infrastructure repair revenue lost from reduced gas sales...which I don't really have a problem with since I still use the road. But some poor writing and riders on the bills would have left EV (and some hybrid) owners wide open for unfair taxation.

The bills in question went back to be scrapped or seriously re-written so we'll see what the new legislative session comes up with.
For now we have the $64 for EVs, which I think used to also be assessed on hybrids and PHEVs but then revised to only apply to pure EVs?

https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/webdoc/pdf/dmv201.pdf
 

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In Georgia, we started as an EV friendly state with a $2500 EV credit that was taken away by state legislation and replaced with a $200/yr fee for driving the EV. The fee far exceeds (almost double for me) what the average EV owner would have paid in the 'displaced' gas tax revenues. The part that bothers me the most is that we are already taxed by means of the electricity that we pay for to charge our cars! It is equivalent to paying taxes to purchase gasoline from gas stations, and then paying taxes to put it in the tank. Remember, this $200 EV tax in Georgia is in addition to the ad valorem tax and $20 annual tag fee.
So, actually, the credit for electric was $5,000 (Volt & PHEVs were never eligible). The $200 fee (which increased to 204.20) is for EVs and PHEVs. For PHEVs they only have to pay the fee if they choose to get the AFV license plate (which gives you access to the HOV lanes). In other words, if you buy a Volt and don't need the HOV lanes (which are mostly pointless as they are not properly policed), then you don't pay the $200.
https://dor.georgia.gov/sites/dor.g...Bulletin/Bulletin - AFV Fees - July 2016 .pdf
 

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You need to understand that EV owners are making other people pay for their cars so they need to be punished.

At least, that's what some think.
 

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This is not a "penalty", the offenders here are that EVs do not pay road use tax making it unfair to drivers of ICEs. However, it doesn't seem like a way to encourage people to drive EVs.
If by "road tax" you mean gas taxes, then I might point out that Michigan, with one of the highest gas taxes in the nation at $0.26 per gallon, is taxing as though the EV were saving 500 gallons of gas. At 30 MPG, 500 gallons represents 15,000 miles per year. At a more typical economy for someone that buys an EV who'd otherwise pick something similarly small and similarly efficiency-focused, it's probably more like 18-20,000 mile per year. That's pretty much putting EVs into the position of picking up a LOT more that their share of just "gas tax offset". $50-75 per year might be fair; Idaho's is a "without lube" situation.
 
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