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Discussion Starter #1
Given the potential long intervals between ICE operation does anyone use Sta-Bil or similar products to keep the fuel from going stale? Does higher octane fuel have a better "shelf life" than 87?
 

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Given the potential long intervals between ICE operation does anyone use Sta-Bil or similar products to keep the fuel from going stale? Does higher octane fuel have a better "shelf life" than 87?
The Volt automatically runs fuel maintenance cycles if gas is not used for a period of time (I believe it's 6 weeks). Just drive and don't worry about it.
 

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Read your owners manual and don't add Sta-Bil to your Volt's gas tank.
 

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Don't add ANY additives to any fluids in a modern vehicle. Owner's manuals I have read since ~2000 have all warned against using additives (especial engine oil) to the point of voiding the warranty.
 

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Given the potential long intervals between ICE operation does anyone use Sta-Bil or similar products to keep the fuel from going stale? Does higher octane fuel have a better "shelf life" than 87?
Zero need for this. GM has engineered everything the engine needs.
 

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The Volt automatically runs fuel maintenance cycles if gas is not used for a period of time (I believe it's 6 weeks). Just drive and don't worry about it.
6 weeks is the EMM (engine maintenance mode) interval. Fuel over 1 year old is handled by FMM. But bro1999 is 100% accurate concerning "Just drive and don't worry about it."
 

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The Volt automatically runs fuel maintenance cycles if gas is not used for a period of time (I believe it's 6 weeks). Just drive and don't worry about it.
And the G1 fuel tank is pressurized to minimize evaporation of the more volatile constituents. I suspect that the same is true for the G2.

KNS
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It would be interesting having a conversation with a grandson, "Yeah, last time I bought gasoline, four, no, no, five years ago...". And I guess the car will take care of the rest.
 

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Gas will store fine for up to a year in the Volt tank thanks to how it is engineered. After that, the car keeps track of fuel age and will use it up if it gets too old. No additives needed. No manual tracking needed. Just drive it.

I suspect that higher octane fuel stores better just because one effect of storage can be a loss of octane.

I use Sta-bil in my lawnmower gas can and have had good results with it for that application. I learned recently that it works by creating a floating film on the surface of the gasoline to isolate it from the air in the container.
 

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I thought about it, but the Fuel maintenance takes care of that. Also every six weeks is engine maintenance, not fuel.
 

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I keep a car in storage that I rarely use. I've been using Sta-Bil to prevent fuel from going stale. The longest I've had it on storage was 2 years and can attest it really works, very important to use specially with ethanol blended fuel.

If you research this product you'll find all good things being said about it. From my personal experience I would say it doesn't hurt to use it, and that it would be beneficial if the fuel stays unused in your Volt for longer than a year.

I also agree using higher octane fuel is a good idea if fuel is hardly ever used.
 

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I avoid "stabilizers" in all my machines by only buying fuel in small quantities. At the end of the season, I run my snow blower or lawn mower dry. Sometimes I'll keep gas around for the generator, but for only a month. After a month, I siphon it into my wife's Toyota and buy fresh.
 

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It would be interesting having a conversation with a grandson, "Yeah, last time I bought gasoline, four, no, no, five years ago...". And I guess the car will take care of the rest.
This should not be possible with a Volt unless you turn the car off and don’t even start it for years. The Volt is programmed to initiate a Fuel Maintenance Mode when the average age of the gas in the tank is approximately one year old (you have the option of postponing it for 24 hours). Once it starts, the Volt runs in Range Extending mode (i.e., uses the ICE) until the average age of gas in the tank is no longer 12 months old. You won’t be able to run on grid power from the battery, even if the battery is fully charged.

If your FMM occurs when your tank is half full or less (or if after it starts, you drive until the tank is half full or less), you can bring it to an end by adding enough new gas to double the existing amount. This will bring the "average age" down to 6 months, and you’ve reset the next FMM to happen 6 months down the road (winter’s coming up, and you might be using the ICE within that time frame). Adding new gas to more than a half tank of existing 12 month old gas brings the "average age" down below 12 months, but not by much, and the next FMM will occur that much sooner.

You can choose to drive until the gas tank runs dry (at which point you regain the use of the battery, but since the gas engine is no longer available, you’ll operate in Reduced Propulsion mode until you get more gas). This provides the longest interval until the next FMM (~ 12 months). After you refuel and start the car, the ICE will run briefly to check itself out, and then turn itself off and return you to normal Electric mode.

After you put new gas into the tank, almost all of the gas will be "fresh" gas. A small amount of gas remains in the system even after the ICE stops running because the "tank is empty." If you fill your tank after running out of gas, as I do in my 2012 Volt, your next FMM will occur ~363 days later. Our friend Ari C puts into his emptied tank only the bare minimum needed to end the FMM (~1.5 gallons), and his next FMMs tend to be ~318 days later. The difference is because the small amount of "old" gas remaining in the system lowers the "average age" of 1.5 gallons by a few days more than it does the average age of a full tank.

One final comment: once the FMM message has appeared, be sure you Start the FMM (even if you choose to postpone it 24 hours) so the programming can then End it after you take action. Attempts to avoid it by postponing the process and then refueling the same day may produce unwanted consequences. Perhaps, for example, the computer does not recalculate average fuel age until fuel is added after the FMM has been Started, and if so, the postponed FMM may Start the following day, and you may need to add even more gas to bring it to an end.
 

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I have no issues with running the gas motor in our 2016 Volt. MPG we have been getting in our 2016 Volt is 45 mpg +, and last check yesterday running at 40-55 mph was 52 mpg on gas for 35 miles. Infact now with fall weather here our 2010 Prius is only getting about 3-5 mpg more than our Volt when running on gas.

Its probably better for the engine as well to run 20-40 miles on gas once in a while, maybe once or twice a month...
 

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...If you research this product you'll find all good things being said about it. From my personal experience I would say it doesn't hurt to use it, and that it would be beneficial if the fuel stays unused in your Volt for longer than a year...
The Volt's fuel maintenance mode will not allow the average age to exceed about one year. After that, if you turn on the car, it will burn gas until fuel is added to bring the average age of fuel in the tank to under one year.

I also agree using higher octane fuel is a good idea if fuel is hardly ever used.
The G1 manual states that premium is required although some on this forum use regular. I doubt there is any advantage to using premium in a G2.

KNS
 

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I keep a car in storage that I rarely use. I've been using Sta-Bil to prevent fuel from going stale. The longest I've had it on storage was 2 years and can attest it really works, very important to use specially with ethanol blended fuel.

Fuel Separation
The main problem with ethanol fuel is that it absorbs water from the atmosphere. Even fuel with a small amount or ethanol such as an E10 blend can absorb up to 50% more water from the atmosphere than gasoline.
So what’s the problem with water in your gas tank? Basically once the amount of water in the fuel reaches saturation point, it causes the fuel to separate into two layers; one thick and one thin. The thick layer contains gasoline and a small amount of ethanol. The thin layer contains water with ethanol. Even a small amount of water will cause this separation. Even in a modern sealed fuel system water can separate out, for example when there are changes in temperature.






This is why I fuel up almost exclusively using non-ethanol in my Gen1!;)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So if one were to buy say 1 gallon per month they might never get to the age averaging cutoff, provided they drove one trip a month that burned some gasoline. About 2 times every 3 months I drive ~90 miles round trip to meet family for lunch. I presume that would be deplete the electric and use ~1 gallon of fuel.
 

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Just to recount my experience, I've had my 2014 for 2.5 yrs now, and have averaged almost exactly 1 gallon per month. I put in 2-3 gallons at a time, when I get down to "Low". I've had EMM 2 or 3 times, but never FMM.
 

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The Volt's fuel maintenance mode will not allow the average age to exceed about one year. After that, if you turn on the car, it will burn gas until fuel is added to bring the average age of fuel in the tank to under one year.


KNS
Fuel going bad is not instantaneous at day 366, it degrades gradually. I don't see the harm in delaying this gradual decomposition of fuel by using Sta-Bil if someone is using Volt in electric mode only.

Of course the Volt's fuel management works as designed and it's not imperative you do this, but if you decide otherwise it will do good, not harm.
 

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The G1 manual states that premium is required although some on this forum use regular. I doubt there is any advantage to using premium in a G2.

KNS
Premium is 91 octane or higher...
ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1476412626.653427.jpg

There's higher than 91, like 93 Octane available in some gas stations (Shell V Power +Nitro)
ImageUploadedByAutoGuide1476412681.755064.jpg
 
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