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I just bought a 2018 Volt LT. This is my 3rd Volt. The car came with a full tank of gas (thank you) absolutely no charge and all tires are under-inflated.

I mean after all this time, can't these dealers get it straight?
 

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Depends on the dealer, sounds like you picked a lousy one.
 

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I just bought a 2018 Volt LT. This is my 3rd Volt. The car came with a full tank of gas (thank you) absolutely no charge and all tires are under-inflated.

I mean after all this time, can't these dealers get it straight?
Took me FOUR days to get get the dealer to properly charge our first Volt before I could even test drive it. When I showed up at the dealership I asked if it had been charged (I'd specifically requested it be fully charged) the salesman said "No, I don't think so, but you know it has an engine right? You can just drive it around on gas, no problem!".

First oil change the tech deflated all the tires to the point the low pressure warning went off in the parking lot when I went to leave.

Second Volt I purchased, same thing, -22C when I went to see it, battery flat dead (despite the fact they knew I was coming) and so cold soaked that it went into reduced propulsion mode immediately. Thankfully it hard enough left to start the ICE...

At least it delivered with the tires in at least some semblance of the right pressure range...but the lot jockey who went to fill it up before I took delivery almost put regular gas in it...when I caught him before he left and told him it required premium he looked at me sideways. I'm still not convinced he didn't end up putting regular in it anyways (and I suspect the previous owner was using regular as well) since the projected ICE range is showing woefully poor right now, but I've only burned a few liters.
 

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My dealer is EV-friendly. When I bought my Volt it came with a full charge and a full tank of gas. Tires were also at proper pressure. It all depends on the dealer I suppose.
 

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I've yet to see a dealer put 42#'s in any car which is what I carry. Oh well, if the dealers aren't perfect, at least my Volt has been.
 

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Before I got home with my '18 Volt yesterday (200+ miles away), I got a diagnostic email that my tires were low. Also got NUMEROUS requests for all 5's for rating, even had to ring a bell before I could go. <rolls eyes> The email stated my tires were at 30 psi. Outside temp when I left was 20°F. When I left home that morning it was -4° for about the first hour. Obviously the tires were low due to cold weather.
 

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Before I got home with my '18 Volt yesterday (200+ miles away), I got a diagnostic email that my tires were low. Also got NUMEROUS requests for all 5's for rating, even had to ring a bell before I could go. <rolls eyes> The email stated my tires were at 30 psi. Outside temp when I left was 20°F. When I left home that morning it was -4° for about the first hour. Obviously, the tires were low due to cold weather.
I got that same diagnostic when I arrived home as well and I was incessantly reminded to give them 10's.
 

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No doubt, dealers never change. I lucked out for a period of time with a decent local dealership that treated me very well, but then for whatever reason they also started dropping the ball over the last couple years. It’s a shame as this will turn off a lot of people to the brand.
 

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I find that telling them before-hand of your expectations tends to yield the desired result. "When I come to finalize the paper work I expect a full charge, a full tank of gas, properly inflated tires, a clean car inside and out with all the standard accessories (charge cords, air compressor, etc.)."

Now, they would do this anyway in my experience. Or maybe it's because i told them in advance? Sure they should do it without being told, but a few words in advance eliminates the issue and everyone leaves happy.
 

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I bought my 2013 back in June - I had been checking cars.com to see what was available in my area, found a dealer 40 miles away that just got a car exactly like I was looking for. CarFax showed it had been registered in Mich. as a manufacturer's car, never registered to a private owner, 27K miles. I called and was told I was welcome to come look at it but it was fresh off the truck, had not been prepped or serviced for sale yet. When I first saw it the GM labels and decals were still on the windows, car was dirty from transport, had a few scuffs on the door panels, dirty mats, etc. But it drove perfectly and we came up with a satisfactory deal with me giving them a couple days to prep the car, understanding it had to be right, have 2 key fobs, etc.

When I picked it up the car was pristine! It could have been on their new car floor. Full charge on the battery. It had 1/4 tank of gas and when I checked the tires at home, they were right on pressure. The salesman was a really great guy to deal with, taking time to walk me through the basic operation and features of the car. I am totally pleased with the vehicle.

But - Then comes the final part of the transaction with the finance guy who wanted to up the profit. I told him to cut the sales pitch on the warranty and add-ons, tell me the bottom line and I'll write the check. He sneered and said, "Oh, I guess you want to roll the dice, huh?" He said he was required to offer all the stuff and we went through the whole mess - warranty, fabric protection, glass treatment, paint treatment, nitrogen in the tires, etc. - printing out a bunch of forms with me having to sign off as declining each item. A transaction that should have taken 10 minutes max stretched out to over 1/2 hour. Like the man said, some things never change.

The only time I ever came away from a car deal without a bad taste in my mouth was when I bought a new 04 Volvo. The sales and finance guys treated us with respect, answered questions accurately, and listened to what we wanted. The dealership is a real class act, and their subsequent service was excellent.
 

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I bought my 2013 back in June - I had been checking cars.com to see what was available in my area, found a dealer 40 miles away that just got a car exactly like I was looking for. CarFax showed it had been registered in Mich. as a manufacturer's car, never registered to a private owner, 27K miles. I called and was told I was welcome to come look at it but it was fresh off the truck, had not been prepped or serviced for sale yet. When I first saw it the GM labels and decals were still on the windows, car was dirty from transport, had a few scuffs on the door panels, dirty mats, etc. But it drove perfectly and we came up with a satisfactory deal with me giving them a couple days to prep the car, understanding it had to be right, have 2 key fobs, etc.

When I picked it up the car was pristine! It could have been on their new car floor. Full charge on the battery. It had 1/4 tank of gas and when I checked the tires at home, they were right on pressure. The salesman was a really great guy to deal with, taking time to walk me through the basic operation and features of the car. I am totally pleased with the vehicle.

But - Then comes the final part of the transaction with the finance guy who wanted to up the profit. I told him to cut the sales pitch on the warranty and add-ons, tell me the bottom line and I'll write the check. He sneered and said, "Oh, I guess you want to roll the dice, huh?" He said he was required to offer all the stuff and we went through the whole mess - warranty, fabric protection, glass treatment, paint treatment, nitrogen in the tires, etc. - printing out a bunch of forms with me having to sign off as declining each item. A transaction that should have taken 10 minutes max stretched out to over 1/2 hour. Like the man said, some things never change.

The only time I ever came away from a car deal without a bad taste in my mouth was when I bought a new 04 Volvo. The sales and finance guys treated us with respect, answered questions accurately, and listened to what we wanted. The dealership is a real class act, and their subsequent service was excellent.
I've picked up the whole stack and ripped up what I'd didn't want and tossed them into the trash. Makes it easy and makes it really clear who is in charge.
 

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Same here only I just said "Nope not willing to go through all that crap" and walked.
Got a call from the sales manager the next day saying the car was ready if I wanted to come in, hand over a check, and sign the sales agreements
 

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The only time I ever came away from a car deal without a bad taste in my mouth was when I bought a new 04 Volvo. The sales and finance guys treated us with respect, answered questions accurately, and listened to what we wanted. The dealership is a real class act, and their subsequent service was excellent.
I've had similar experiences with several Volvos over the years. My speculation is that this is due to customer demographics. The average Volvo buyer wouldn't stand for this, while the average Chevy buyer might be easier to squeeze some additional profit out of. Unfortunately for Chevy, the average Volt buyer is a different demographic from the average Chevy buyer.

In general, considering how much Chevy dealers know (or don't know) about the Volt, is it any surprise they don't sell many?
 

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Things change. What about the TESLA ,no dealership method?. Better or worse?.
No doubt that dealerships suck money out of the system, but it remains to be seen if the Tesla distribution model will survive. A really good dealership can be a tremendous asset -- a poor one, just a leach.
 

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Things change. What about the TESLA ,no dealership method?. Better or worse?.
The problem with Tesla's model is that they won't be able to provide convenient service. There are two Tesla service centers in Massachusetts, none in New Hampshire, and both service centers are 30 miles away from me. On the other hand there are three Chevy dealers within 10 miles of me, and that's true no matter where you live because there are 4300 dealers in the US. To replicate that network Tesla would have to spend 20-40 billion dollars (I'm assuming that it would be $5M to $10M per location). That's the advantage of the dealership model, the dealers provide the capital not the manufacturer, they also are responsible for the costs of the sales and service personnel. The disadvantage is that they are independent businesses so the manufacturer has no control over their quality which is why so many are downright awful.
 

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My '17 Volt is the first GM car I've ever leased, and will likely be the last. I like the car in general and haven't had any serious issues, though I do find some of the interior quality to be laughable for the price point. But the dealership experience...yikes. Yes, there are tons of Chevy dealers all over the country, but I'm not sure how many good ones. The first one I went to in order to test drive resulted in lots of waiting around, yelling kids, and salespeople and customers having what should have been very private, tense, uncomfortable conversations about credit scores and financing right out in the open for all to hear. Sales guy was nice, but totally unqualified and they didn't have a car I wanted. I walked.

Second experience at a different dealer when I decided I wanted to proceed with leasing a Volt had me having to deal with the "sales manager" when my sales guy decided he couldn't squeeze as much out of me as the other guy might. Sales manager tells me that if I was to step out the door to consider the deal in private that I would permanently forfeit the $1k coupon they were applying. Needless to say, I walked.

Third time's a charm right? Went to a nearby dealership that had a practically identical car as the one at dealership #2, worked an acceptable deal, and went through with it. I still had to wait an unreasonably long time to get in to see the finance guy and ended up leaving in a car with a tank of gas and a little over a halfway charged battery.

I'll enjoy driving the car for the next couple of years, despising any time I have to go to a dealer, and hope for more EV options from the likes of BMW, Volvo, and Merc in 2020.
 

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I'll enjoy driving the car for the next couple of years, despising any time I have to go to a dealer, and hope for more EV options from the likes of BMW, Volvo, and Merc in 2020.
Amen. I really like my Volt despite all its shortcomings, but no doubt GM could have done a better job.
 

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I still had to wait an unreasonably long time to get in to see the finance guy and ended up leaving in a car with a tank of gas and a little over a halfway charged battery.
I had a noon appt but arrived an hour early (4 hour drive for me). My Volt was detailed and sitting on the warm side of the building (20F). I was in/out in 2 hours and the salesman shared his lunch (from Culvers) with me.
 
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