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You can get fined for warming up your car by idling it during the winter. The Popular Mechanics article pointed out but
not so with our Chevy Volt especially when it is plugged in. We can precondition our Chevy Volt such as when preparing to leave for work, so that the car is already warm and toasty without burning any gasoline. It is the same during the summer, we can remotely cool down our car before we get into it. The amount of time to precondition the Volt was to comply with many existing laws so that you aren't in violation when preconditioning.

Doesn't apply to gas powered cars produced by GM that can be remotely started or preconditioned, that is why the app warns you of "Use remote start when it is safe and legal", which isn't displayed in the fobkey of course. You can die of carbon monoxide poisoning inside a garage if you precondition your gasoline car, that is why the safety precaution and the regulations. Come to think of it, many trucks in the rest areas are idling all night as the drivers sleep.

Anyway, here are the states that makes it illegal for idling your car just to warm it up during the winter.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/a14517457/is-idling-your-car-to-warm-it-up-actually-illegal/
 

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Which is why Block Heaters are so important for diesels...:)
 

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You do have to beware of ERDTT if preheating while not plugged in. I caught Hal idling away after I preheated at work the other day. No stinkin' preheat laws where I live though.
 

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My 2012 Volt starts the engine preheating even when plugged in, especially if it is 0F or colder highs like we have for the next 3 days and the garage freezes... no option to disable it on the 2012 without disabling ERDTT (good reason to do so).

I think a lot of the laws are to prevent theft, most stolen cars in my area are from idiots going into the gas station leaving their car idling and someone hops in and drives off.

This is why most remote starts don't actually start the other systems in the car and lock the doors.
 

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My 2012 Volt starts the engine preheating even when plugged in, especially if it is 0F or colder highs like we have for the next 3 days and the garage freezes... no option to disable it on the 2012 without disabling ERDTT (good reason to do so).

I think a lot of the laws are to prevent theft, most stolen cars in my area are from idiots going into the gas station leaving their car idling and someone hops in and drives off.

This is why most remote starts don't actually start the other systems in the car and lock the doors.
It's a municipal by-law here, and the rationale given was to reduce pollution. All those other reasons are bonus effects. You can get a knock on the door from the police if you leave your car unlocked, but I'm not sure if there is a penalty.
 

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JoeReal thanks for the reminder. I pre-condition both of my vehicles as needed here in Illinois.
 

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Funny how police cars sitting somewhere idling for hours are deemed not to have an environmental impact. ;)


And of course they want you to clean all the ice and snow off the car before driving, just don't get it warn so the ice melts off the windows.
 

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Funny how police cars sitting somewhere idling for hours are deemed not to have an environmental impact. ;)


And of course they want you to clean all the ice and snow off the car before driving, just don't get it warn so the ice melts off the windows.
In one recent report about police vehicle fuel consumption, the cruiser studied was found to idle 60% of the time during normal operation and used 21% of its total fuel while parked.(Eric Rask, et al., Argonne National Laboratory, Final Report: Police Cruiser Fuel Consumption Characterization, for the Illinois State Toll Highway Authority (February 2013).) While the engine provided 250 horsepower (hp), together all of the accessories needed less than 2 hp. (Air conditioning consumed the most power, followed by external lighting.)

https://www.afdc.energy.gov/uploads/publication/idling_emergency-service_vehicles.pdf
 

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In one recent report about police vehicle fuel consumption, the cruiser studied was found to idle 60% of the time during normal operation and used 21% of its total fuel while parked.(Eric Rask, et al., Argonne National Laboratory, Final Report: Police Cruiser Fuel Consumption Characterization, for the Illinois State Toll Highway Authority (February 2013).) While the engine provided 250 horsepower (hp), together all of the accessories needed less than 2 hp. (Air conditioning consumed the most power, followed by external lighting.)

https://www.afdc.energy.gov/uploads/publication/idling_emergency-service_vehicles.pdf
You would think that the police market would be a natural for some sort of PHEV - massive fuel savings from all the idling time, never a worry about getting started on a cold morning, lots of electric power for all the lights and radios and the like with no worries about running the 12V down.

There haven't really been PHEVs in platforms law enforcement uses so far - the Two mode hybrid Tahoes might have been possible, the current T8 Volvos would be natural choices but I don't think I've ever seen a Volvo patrol car in the US.
 

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You can get fined for warming up your car by idling it during the winter. The Popular Mechanics article pointed out but
not so with our Chevy Volt especially when it is plugged in. We can precondition our Chevy Volt such as when preparing to leave for work, so that the car is already warm and toasty without burning any gasoline. It is the same during the summer, we can remotely cool down our car before we get into it. The amount of time to precondition the Volt was to comply with many existing laws so that you aren't in violation when preconditioning.

Doesn't apply to gas powered cars produced by GM that can be remotely started or preconditioned, that is why the app warns you of "Use remote start when it is safe and legal", which isn't displayed in the fobkey of course. You can die of carbon monoxide poisoning inside a garage if you precondition your gasoline car, that is why the safety precaution and the regulations. Come to think of it, many trucks in the rest areas are idling all night as the drivers sleep.

Anyway, here are the states that makes it illegal for idling your car just to warm it up during the winter.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/cars/a14517457/is-idling-your-car-to-warm-it-up-actually-illegal/
It is also bad for the ICE...:)

http://www.roadandtrack.com/car-culture/videos/a30249/why-you-shouldnt-warm-up-your-car/

The conventional wisdom that you should idle your car up to operating temperature comes from the days of carburetors, which needed several minutes of idling to get to an operating temperature where they'd run smoothly. With fuel-injected engines, the ECU can adjust itself to idle perfectly even in sub-zero weather. And as Jason explains, idling an engine doesn't really build up much heat at all, compared to driving it.

Jason goes through the details of what happens in a cold engine, and points out the hidden damage of letting your car idle for a long time on a cold day: Engine oil dilution. It turns out, while you might have thought that letting your car slowly warm up was reducing wear and tear, all that idling time leads to raw gasoline seeping into the oil, breaking down the oil's lubrication properties and increasing the wear.

So what should you do? Start it up, make sure all your windows are clear of ice/snow/fog, and just drive the thing! The engine will warm up faster, and therefore you'll get nice warm heat coming out of the vents sooner, which is what you want anyway.

 

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Whilst I'm opposed to wasteful idling, I am grateful for the one time when my car's alternator went bad, and ran down my battery before I got home, leaving me stranded on the side of the road on a very cold day. A nice trooper pulled up behind me turned on his blue light, and let me sit in the passenger seat to stay warm, while idling, as we waited for the tow truck to arrive.
 
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