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Like the title says, has anyone figured out a way to permanently override the default 8 amp charge setting on 2014 and similar Volts?

In the winter months I need to charge at 12 amps to be ready to go in the morning. And changing the setting every time I pull in the drive is a bit annoying.
 

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16 amps, actually. 8 on one leg, another 8 from the other.
And, no. There's no option for 24 amp (12 + 12) on 240 volt supply.
No gen1 Volt charges at 16amps, that would be 3.8kW, these have 3.3kW chargers, so they max out at 13.75 amps when on 240V. I assume Sly Bob was talking about hack that uses the gen2 EVSE on 240V... since its firmware believes it's a level 1 (120V) device, it only allows 12amps max. But you can easily mod it to work on 240V, it's just still maxed at 12 amps.

Christiann777, that's really your only solution: go L2. Or just get really good at switching from 8 to 12 like I did :p
 

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The nominal kW capacity of the AC to DC converter is based on a nominal 120 volt supply (per leg).
Provide more voltage and there is more power produced than if a lesser voltage is provided, even though at the same current.
I have slightly over 120 volts per leg at my home. 8 amperes on one leg at 123 volts (as at my home), and another 8 amperes on the other, opposing 123 volt potential leg is 16 amperes combined, at 246 volts combined. 16 amps X 246 volts = 3,936 watts.
I seldom pull a full 8 amps per leg, but the higher voltage my utility provides does mean I typically exceed the claimed 3.3kW 'limit' during charging.
 

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The nominal kW capacity of the AC to DC converter is based on a nominal 120 volt supply (per leg).
Provide more voltage and there is more power produced than if a lesser voltage is provided, even though at the same current.
I have slightly over 120 volts per leg at my home. 8 amperes on one leg at 123 volts (as at my home), and another 8 amperes on the other, opposing 123 volt potential leg is 16 amperes combined, at 246 volts combined. 16 amps X 246 volts = 3,936 watts.
I seldom pull a full 8 amps per leg, but the higher voltage my utility provides does mean I typically exceed the claimed 3.3kW 'limit' during charging.
Gen1 Volts don't pull 16 amps, ever... you are not charging at 3.9kW. They will never pull more than 13.75 amps, no matter what voltage is present (which is why charging at a commercial station on 208 V is slower than doing 240V at home). Even gen2 max out at 15 amps unless you have the 2019 with 7.2 kW charger.

Edit: Just to clear, Volt's are current limited, meaning the EVSE and car agree on the max current they can both handle when you plug in. And so Volt will never agree to pull more than 13.75 amps in gen1 or 15 amps in gen2 (unless you have the 7.2 kW charger). If your local voltage is a few volts higher, you'll get a few more watts, but you'll never exceed the current limit. You'll never be at 3.9kW.
 

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8 amperes on one leg at 123 volts (as at my home), and another 8 amperes on the other, opposing 123 volt potential leg is 16 amperes combined, at 246 volts combined. 16 amps X 246 volts = 3,936 watts.
I seldom pull a full 8 amps per leg, but the higher voltage my utility provides does mean I typically exceed the claimed 3.3kW 'limit' during charging.
This is not how single phase 240V residential service works. Both "legs" of your 240V service are opposite ends of a single winding on the secondary of the transformer feeding your house, with a grounded neutral attached in the middle of that winding. Any current flowing on one "leg" of a 240V circuit in a residential service is also flowing (in the opposite direction) on the other "leg" of that 240V circuit. (and of course varying as a sinewave at 60Hz) That is why some of the Voltec EVSEs can be made to work at 240V with a simple adapter plug. In the case of the EVSE, if the two "legs" were independent, there would need to be a separate wire present to complete the circuit (i.e. a neutral), but there is not.
 

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And I stand corrected. I have confirmed that my meter shows 12.75 amps draw on 240 VAC when charging. The ExI=P mathematical calculation of 3,060 watts with that voltage and current correlates to my meter's display of 3,050 watts when charging. Not the apparently imagined 3,500 watts I based my post #5 on. The current limit explanation also clarifies why a doubled voltage does not quadruple the wattage. I should have pulled out my "Ugly's" rather than relying on faulty recollections.
 

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Gen1 Volts don't pull 16 amps, ever... you are not charging at 3.9kW. They will never pull more than 13.75 amps, no matter what voltage is present (which is why charging at a commercial station on 208 V is slower than doing 240V at home).
Actually, my 2015 consistently pulls 14.3 amps at 240 volts with my Duosida:

Product Orange Font Screenshot Material property
 

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Actually, my 2015 consistently pulls 14.3 amps at 240 volts with my Duosida:
Interesting... I am now seeing some old threads that say gen1 can go up to 15 amps, but only when line voltage is lower (like at a 208V commercial station), and 3.3kW cap cannot be exceeded. So looks like I was wrong about the 13.75 hard cap, it can vary a bit, but the 3.3kW is supposed to be a hard limit yet you are exceeding it. I have no explanation for that.
 

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Interesting... I am now seeing some old threads that say gen1 can go up to 15 amps, but only when line voltage is lower (like at a 208V commercial station), and 3.3kW cap cannot be exceeded. So looks like I was wrong about the 13.75 hard cap, it can vary a bit, but the 3.3kW is supposed to be a hard limit yet you are exceeding it. I have no explanation for that.
Are you seeing testing results with meter readings or posts essentially speculating that it might if it were programmed to because it still fit under an assumption that the wattage was the limit instead of the ampacity of the wiring? We learn things. What we know changes as a result.
 

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Interesting... I am now seeing some old threads that say gen1 can go up to 15 amps, but only when line voltage is lower (like at a 208V commercial station), and 3.3kW cap cannot be exceeded. So looks like I was wrong about the 13.75 hard cap, it can vary a bit, but the 3.3kW is supposed to be a hard limit yet you are exceeding it. I have no explanation for that.
The data in the previous post appears to be on the EVSE end of things and reports to be about 3.45 kW. I suspect that the actual charging rate at the car would be somewhat lower due to voltage drop and other efficiency losses. If it were about a 5% loss, that would yield ~3.28kW.
 

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Are you seeing testing results with meter readings or posts essentially speculating that it might if it were programmed to because it still fit under an assumption that the wattage was the limit instead of the ampacity of the wiring? We learn things. What we know changes as a result.
Someone posted they were at a commercial station that reported it was charging at 15A (208*x15=3.1kW) on their gen1 (note that I haven't seen a commercial station that provided this level of info, but it could be out there). Others with home EVSEs that show all the values said they never saw it go above 14A for their gen1 (on 240V). So this isn't definitive, but seems to support what I said. Perhaps not all gen1 years were the same, I really don't know.
 
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