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Just installed new Blizzak snow tires on my new 2018 Volt and my MPGE on my regular commute to work and back dropped from 120 down to 100.
Is this normal? Not sure if this matters but the temps here in Oregon is still mild 45-55.

I may be hallucinating, but the car actually feels like the tires are sticking to the road.
The interesting thing is the mileage drop is about the same as the the heating drop. If I don't run the heat I can gain almost what I lost on the snow tires.
 

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What you are seeing doesn't surprise me. Snow tires are softer, much unlike the hard tires that come on the car. Mileage also goes down with temperature. In Eastern Washington my electric range on a full charge has dropped from 54 miles to 48 miles in the last couple weeks (with OEM tires still on), and like you, the temperatures are still fairly mild. I have bought a a set of studded tires mounted on rims ready to put on when the weather demands, and I fully expect another large drop in mileage when I do. I learned last winter that the OEM tires are horrible in snow and ice, so good winter tires and that drop mileage it just part of the reality of of owning a Volt. I don't plan on installing those tires until snow or freezing rain is in the forecast.
 

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I wish I waited to put them on but I got a good deal.
I wonder if the tire millage will get better once the ground gets colder and the tires start to harden?
 

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I wish I waited to put them on but I got a good deal.
I wonder if the tire millage will get better once the ground gets colder and the tires start to harden?
That seems reasonable. As the tires harder the rolling resistance decreases thus giving a slight (if even noticeable) increase in mileage.
 

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However when the weather changes and the ground begins to freeze, you will require more heat in the cabin to keep it comfortable.

Up here in Northern Ontario, my range dropped to about 25 mile in the 0F temps. And that was with just enough heat in the cabin to keep me comfortable. I am sure part of the loss was also due to the cold soaked battery.


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On my 2011, the Blizzaks cost 5 miles of driving range. Worth it for winter snow handling. I usually put mine on in December depending on a coming snow storm.
 

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Check your tire pressures. I run our tires at 40 pounds for the winter. Just put the winter tires (Blizzaks too) and wheels on our 2016 and expect range to drop from 50-55 down to 40-45miles on electric. Winter arriving later this week here in Wisconsin and loss of mileage is worth every mile for how great these tires are in the winter snow, sleet and ice. Wouldn't be without them! Plus heating and my wife loves the heated steering wheel contributes to the loss of range. Still...
 

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winter tires plus colder temperatures will take a toll on your mileage. Winter tires are designed to be softer and more friction will hurt your distance. The same is true for ICE vehicles too, just EV drivers pay close attention to their EV mileages.
 

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You guys are scaring me about driving my 2018 on snow/ice. I drove a 2013 for 3 winters without any problems. Thru snow so high I basically plowed the street. No problems on the original tires.

Is everyone saying the Gen2’s with original tires aren’t as good?
 

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You guys are scaring me about driving my 2018 on snow/ice. I drove a 2013 for 3 winters without any problems. Thru snow so high I basically plowed the street. No problems on the original tires.

Is everyone saying the Gen2’s with original tires aren’t as good?
I'm saying any car with all seasons will be worse in snow than the same car with snow tires. I think the others are saying the same: snow tires are better in snow.
 

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I had the Michelin EnergySaver AS tires as OE on my 2011 Ford Fusion with AWD. There was a noticeable improvement in how the Ford performed under winter conditions when I switched to Continential tires (either Pure Contact or True Contact, I don't call which one.) I was not impressed with the way the Michelin tires performed in winter conditions. With my Volt my solution, so far, has been to not take the Volt on the road when the weather/road conditions are bad so I can't comment on how the Michelin EnergySaver AS tires perform on the Volt. You can check TireRack for their rating of how different tires perform in specific driving conditions.
 

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You guys are scaring me about driving my 2018 on snow/ice. I drove a 2013 for 3 winters without any problems. Thru snow so high I basically plowed the street. No problems on the original tires.

Is everyone saying the Gen2’s with original tires aren’t as good?
Snow tires are way better for snow. They remain soft under 7 degrees Celsius whereas all seasons would harden and have less friction. Basically speaking, if you live in an area that gets winter snow, get winter tires.
 

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I believe Nokian snows come in LRR varieties for what it’s worth
 

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This is the time of year when I get the absolute worst range: cold temps and all-season tires still on. I'll see the GOM duck into the high 20s regularly, and get actual range into 25 miles for a whole charge. As soon as I put the winter tires on, that'll just back up to 30 or 32 until it gets cold enough that ERDTT starts happening and ruins all good tracking....
 

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You guys are scaring me about driving my 2018 on snow/ice. I drove a 2013 for 3 winters without any problems. Thru snow so high I basically plowed the street. No problems on the original tires.

Is everyone saying the Gen2’s with original tires aren’t as good?
Last April I taught a seminar 7 miles from home, while it snowed. I got there at 7:30am on clear streets. Took about 10 minutes. By 4:00pm there were at least 10 inches on the ground. It took me 45 minutes to get within 15 feet of my driveway. I live on a cul-de-sac and none of my neighbors was dumb enough to go out that day (and create a path for me), so I finally got hung up just as I was about to turn into my driveway. But until then, I did OK by just driving slow and steady (well, except for the 20 minutes it took to get up the highway off-ramp -- four cars ahead of me were stopped cold).

Long story short-- I've got no complaints about the original tires.
 

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Thanks everyone. I already believe that snow tires are better than all-season. (I just need to be convinced to *not* be a cheapskate about buying them + new rims + TPMS :) Fortunately I usually get to choose if I want to drive when it's bad out. I've owned AWDs and both Gen's of Volts. And my Gen1 seemed pretty good, considering the weight/stability vs an AWD (all w/ original tires). My original post was really OT because I was trying to figure out if everyone is saying Gen2's drove differently than Gen1's on their original tires. I'm guessing they're equivalent, and I'll just have to get used to it. Or pony up some $$ to feel more secure.
 

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Thanks everyone. I already believe that snow tires are better than all-season. (I just need to be convinced to *not* be a cheapskate about buying them + new rims + TPMS :) Fortunately I usually get to choose if I want to drive when it's bad out. I've owned AWDs and both Gen's of Volts. And my Gen1 seemed pretty good, considering the weight/stability vs an AWD (all w/ original tires). My original post was really OT because I was trying to figure out if everyone is saying Gen2's drove differently than Gen1's on their original tires. I'm guessing they're equivalent, and I'll just have to get used to it. Or pony up some $$ to feel more secure.
No sense in taking a new vehicle on the road in bad weather. Even if you have snow tires and experience driving in snow with good control of your vehicle you can't account for what the other drivers may do out there. Also, even with snow tires a thin layer of ice on the road can quickly ruin your day.
 

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Thanks everyone. I already believe that snow tires are better than all-season. (I just need to be convinced to *not* be a cheapskate about buying them + new rims + TPMS :) Fortunately I usually get to choose if I want to drive when it's bad out. I've owned AWDs and both Gen's of Volts. And my Gen1 seemed pretty good, considering the weight/stability vs an AWD (all w/ original tires). My original post was really OT because I was trying to figure out if everyone is saying Gen2's drove differently than Gen1's on their original tires. I'm guessing they're equivalent, and I'll just have to get used to it. Or pony up some $$ to feel more secure.
Most people here in Minnesota I'm sure just get by with All Seasons, thinking as many do that the name even applies to the winter season here. I too managed that way many years, until 1992, when I finally broke down and got snows on separate rims. Every car since, that's the way I roll now. One gets spoiled on them.

As for AWD vehicles, I believe it's been shown that an FWD or RWD vehicle on snows, will stop better than an AWD on All Seasons. They may not get going as quickly, but the way I see it, stopping is the most important part.

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Snow tires are way better for snow. They remain soft under 7 degrees Celsius whereas all seasons would harden and have less friction. Basically speaking, if you live in an area that gets winter snow, get winter tires.
Yes, snow tires aren't just for snow, they are also better in the cold.

After internally debating with myself, I put the snow tires on my wife's Bolt tonight. There will be a little bit of slushy snow during her commute tomorrow, and I generally put snow tires on mid-December anyway. The only disadvantage is lost milage. But the Bolt has plenty to spare, so I threw on the snow tires.

One bummer: one tire's TPMS will not relearn. I must have gotten one bad unit from TireRack on these new wheels. That will be an interesting call.
 

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I managed to eke by with the stock tires on my Gen I Volt through 3 winters, mostly because we get our snow a few inches at a time and it's flat, locally. The "go" was acceptable but the "stop" was marginal. If the snowstorms were more like 4"+ and there was some up and down snow tires would have been a must have.
I'll drive my Silverado 4X4 through most of the winter and leave the Bolt in the garage unless the roads are clear of snow, ice, and salt. No use exposing it to corrosion. It's a long term keeper.
 
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