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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2015, and it's been a great car. Just a couple of issues (water leak due to a pinch weld lacking sealer, and a dash rattle...), but nothing serious and nothing involving the drivetrain. However, I'm thinking about trading up. Reasons?

1. Gen 2 more power. Gen 1 can't pull a greased string out of a hen's ass. I realize Gen 2 only an increment better, but anything will help in this area.
2. Appearance. Gen 1 homely, especially from a side view. Back end not too bad, though.
3. EV range. Although Gen 1 has been adequate for my use case.

But my concern: The Gen 2 seems to have more service bulletins than the space shuttle. Are these issues being resolved? Any decent evidence that late production 2017's have the kinks worked out?

I don't want a car that will live in the dealer's service department, nor do I want to sit roadside waiting for AAA to pick me up.

Hans.
 

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I take my 2017 Volt in for its first "routine" service visit on Tuesday. I have checked with the service dept several times and they have assured me there are NO recalls or service TSB's that my Volt needs. I do not want to be surprised and have them tell me they have to order parts and therefore I have to leave the car with them. Fingers crossed that they don't discover something between now and Tuesday! My car has been perfect so far and I really don't want them to mess with it! But the dealer offers a lifetime powertrain warranty ($100 deductable) that requires a visit every six months to keep it in force. Hopefully all they are going to do is change the engine oil and filter...which I don't mind, though it hardly seems necessary since the engine only has about 3000 miles on it.
 

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You did not mention the additional safety features available on the Gen 2. The advanced safety features available on the Gen 2 Volt can actually lower your insurance premium. Also, adaptive cruise control (ACC) is very popular among Gen 2 owners. ACC is only available on the 2017 and newer Volt Premier. The Gen 2 also enables you to be able to use Apple Carplay and Android Auto for navigation, phone, text messaging, and for listening to music, podcasts and audible books.
 

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All great points jcanoe......especially the ACC. My premier has all of the bells and whistles and they are well worth the extra cost.
 

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I take my 2017 Volt in for its first "routine" service visit on Tuesday. I have checked with the service dept several times and they have assured me there are NO recalls or service TSB's that my Volt needs. I do not want to be surprised and have them tell me they have to order parts and therefore I have to leave the car with them. Fingers crossed that they don't discover something between now and Tuesday! My car has been perfect so far and I really don't want them to mess with it! But the dealer offers a lifetime powertrain warranty ($100 deductable) that requires a visit every six months to keep it in force. Hopefully all they are going to do is change the engine oil and filter...which I don't mind, though it hardly seems necessary since the engine only has about 3000 miles on it.
Changing your Volt's engine oil at this time may be unnecessary. On the Gen 2 Volt an oil change and filter is required, at a minimum, every 2 years. The Volt's computer calculates remaining Oil Life by considering total engine revolutions, engine temperature and miles driven. When the Oil Life Remaining is at minimum the Volt will display Change Engine Oil Soon (within 600 miles.) on the Driver Information Center (DIC) display. GM entitles the owner of a new Chevy Volt to two free oil changes within the first 2 years following purchase. If you let the dealer change the oil before it is needed the dealer is just performing unnecessary maintenance on your Volt, potentially creating a problem where non previously existed. Your Volt may only need a multi-point inspection, tire rotation and fluid level top off. Don't be surprised however, if the dealer suddenly discovers that there are several recent TSBs that requires reprogramming your Volt and inspecting the vehicle, possibly replacing certain fuses and other minor bumper to bumper warranty items. It happens all of the time.
 

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Changing your Volt's engine oil at this time may be unnecessary. On the Gen 2 Volt an oil change and filter is required, at a minimum, every 2 years. The Volt's computer calculates remaining Oil Life by considering total engine revolutions, engine temperature and miles driven. When the Oil Life Remaining is at minimum the Volt will display Change Engine Oil Soon (within 600 miles.) on the Driver Information Center (DIC) display. GM entitles the owner of a new Chevy Volt to two free oil changes within the first 2 years following purchase. If you let the dealer change the oil before it is needed the dealer is just performing unnecessary maintenance on your Volt, potentially creating a problem where non previously existed. Your Volt may only need a multi-point inspection, tire rotation and fluid level top off. Don't be surprised if the dealer suddenly discovers that there are several recent TSB that requires reprogramming your Volt and inspecting the vehicle, possibly replacing certain fuses and other minor bumper to bumper warranty items. It happens all of the time.
I may be old school but I really like to change the oil after 1000-2000 miles. I like to ensure all the manufacturing dirt and burrs are cleaned out. It may not do much, but I figure the $30 is cheap insurance and I have put over 100,000 miles on many a car without a single engine issue ever.
 

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I may be old school but I really like to change the oil after 1000-2000 miles. I like to ensure all the manufacturing dirt and burrs are cleaned out. It may not do much, but I figure the $30 is cheap insurance and I have put over 100,000 miles on many a car without a single engine issue ever.
You should do whatever makes you happy. Personally I follow the manufacturer's recommended service interval/schedule for all vehicle maintenance. My reasoning is that Chevrolet has been an automotive manufacturer since 1911. GM's knowledge base of information on their vehicles and engines would fill several football stadiums (ok, I'm exaggerating but only a little bit.) GM engineers know with a high degree of certainty what critically affects engine oil life, engine oil contamination contributing to excess engine wear leading to engine failure. Modern synthetic oils greatly extends the service life of an engine's oil. For the Volt, based on some of the data in that huge GM knowledge base database, 80 - 90% of the typical Volt owner's daily driving is all electric driving. The Volt's engine and engine oil only get used 10 - 20% of the typical service of an internal combustion engine. If it was not for the 24 month clock that considers the age of the oil in the engine the oil change interval could conceivably be even longer. My Volt's engine oil remaining life is following a 24 month calendar, probably because I make minimal use of the gas engine. I will schedule my first oil change before the second year anniversary of my 2017 Volt at the same time I perform the next tire rotation. Some people don't rotate their tires, ever. I happen to subscribe the notion that periodic tire rotation helps even out tire wear front and rear.
 

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I'd have to suggest against trading in unless the Gen 2 is just all around something you want more. The good thing is, your Gen 1 has done the biggest part of it's depreciation which you would start all over with if you buy a Gen 2. Secondly, you know how reliable your '15 has been and it's got sufficient range for you. I really have no big complaints about the power of the Gen 1 other than I wish it had a little more to give when passing at freeway speeds but for around town it's got plenty of power. Exterior vision is lacking in the Gen 1, and not sure if that was addressed in the Gen 2, but that, in combination with the extra safety and convenience features is something that would have me contemplating and weighing in the cost difference.

Most models do tend to have some reliability setbacks after a major redesign and it appears the Gen 2 is definitely firmly in that camp. Unfortunately the later 17's and '18's haven't been out long enough to know if they took care of most of these issues but we do know the Gen 1 has really proven itself for long term reliability.
 

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I will report back after my svc visit. Hopefully just a routine check.
 

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First, I don't know if you actually mean trade-in to the dealer, or you mean you'll sell your Gen1 and then buy a Gen2. I always hate to hear of anyone trading in a car to the dealer. They're good at hiding it, but know that you're always getting screwed when you trade-in. Just sell the car yourself. The internet makes it very easy to do these days.

If you need more range and acceleration then go for the Gen2.

Personally I prefer the styling on the Gen1. The Gen2 looks too Civic-ish for me. And, as you say, reliability of the Gen2 hasn't been as excellent as the Gen1. But, the Gen1 is one of the best engineered cars ever made by anyone, and some lowering of standards was inevitable with the Gen2 to lower costs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yes, yes. I know about Gen 2 options and features. You're entirely missing my question: Will the Gen 2 leave me stranded alongside the road, or have they got the various issues sorted out? That's all I really want to know.

Hans.

You did not mention the additional safety features available on the Gen 2. The advanced safety features available on the Gen 2 Volt can actually lower your insurance premium. Also, adaptive cruise control (ACC) is very popular among Gen 2 owners. ACC is only available on the 2017 and newer Volt Premier. The Gen 2 also enables you to be able to use Apple Carplay and Android Auto for navigation, phone, text messaging, and for listening to music, podcasts and audible books.
 

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Yes, yes. I know about Gen 2 options and features. You're entirely missing my question: Will the Gen 2 leave me stranded alongside the road, or have they got the various issues sorted out? That's all I really want to know.

Hans.
My 2017 Volt has never left me stranded. I make a point to pay attention to any warning lights or error messages should they occur. I attend to any recall notices or TSBs promptly. I carry a spare tire, jack and tire changing tools. I have OnStar emergency roadside assistance should I need a tow. What else would I need? You won't find a written guarantee that a given car won't develop a problem but you can be prepared for the most likely contingencies.

My last vehicle, a 2011 Ford Fusion never left me stranded but I am pretty sure my Ford tried to kill me a few times; loss of power steering due to a bad power steering unit, loss of power while on the highway due to bad throttle body.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hi, and again, thanks. Yes, good policy to pay attention to lights, messages, recalls, etc. But my Gen 1 has had no lights, messages, recalls, etc. Even if a Gen 2 doesn't leave me stranded, I don't want to make a hobby of attending to warning messages and carrying every conceivable emergency tool. I just want to drive it and not fuss with it. I don't want to have to use AAA. Gen 1 is working just fine, but I would trade up to the Gen 2 if I had some idea if it's reliability is similar.

Hans.

My 2017 Volt has never left me stranded. I make a point to pay attention to any warning lights or error messages should they occur. I attend to any recall notices or TSBs promptly. I carry a spare tire, jack and tire changing tools. I have OnStar emergency roadside assistance should I need a tow. What else would I need? You won't find a written guarantee that a given car won't develop a problem but you can be prepared for the most likely contingencies.

My last vehicle, a 2011 Ford Fusion never left me stranded but I am pretty sure my Ford tried to kill me a few times; loss of power steering due to a bad power steering unit, loss of power while on the highway due to bad throttle body.
 

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Unfortunately that's a tough question to answer. I've known people who've had Hondas that spent more time being worked on than driving, and I've known people who've had Fiats with no issues what so ever. It's really a craps shot, though in general I don't believe the Gen 2 is any less reliable than most other cars out there. I'm sure a lot of the known issues have been addressed with TSB's, and as those come out they generally apply them to the units being built at the time so they're always getting better.
 

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I debated this myself--and went with a Gen 2. However, I would have kept my Gen 1 if it hadn't been in an accident and I didn't want to deal with the inevitable long-term issues that plagued every car I' owned that's had bodywork. Heck, I knew all the quirks of the Gen 1 was used to them... and my ICE only had about 15K of miles on it (out of 55K total). This was basically a new car.

Gen 2 is an evolution, but not a revolution. I prefer the Gen 1 style, but the Gen 2 is definitely more refined in every other way.

For me, the extra range will make my round-trip work commute EV only in moderate temps--big game changer.

You have some specific reasons for the Gen 2, so you should probably do an in-depth test drive in various conditions to make sure it has the power you want. 0-30 will please you, but it tends to be a bit less pronounced above that.

I will add that while Gen 1 is an engineering marvel, it also had its unusual "first gen" issues. I had to get a partial battery replacement and had many "teething pain" issues that would frustrate all but committed early adopters. Part of that was design and the other part was simple local inexperience and training with working on these rare(r) cars. My "hope" is that the redesign fixed some of these other powertrain and software gremlins that is to be expected with such a revolutionary car.

Good luck with your thought process and let us know.
 

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I own both. Gen 2 is a worthy upgrade imo. Both generations have been reliable for me thus far. I have 23k miles on the gen 2 and haven't had a single hiccup. The gen 1 (53k miles) has been flawless until two weeks ago when it developed a clicking noise from the left front wheel. They're replacing the driver side axle this week under the powertrain warranty. I'd trade in the gen 1 for a 2nd gen 2, but I'm wanting to go full BEV on the next vehicle and I'm waiting for GM to offer ACC and Moonroof options for the Bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
OK, thanks.

Good to hear your Gen 2 working fine so far.

Hopefully all the early Gen 2 gremlins have been rectified in the latest builds, but you never know. I mean, note how they haven't improved the Gen 1 coolant sensor replacement part. (FWIW, I have the WOT replacement piece, but have yet to install it.)

I think I just might pull the trigger. It's kind of silly from a $ and cents standpoint, as the 2015 has been a nice car. Will likely cost nearly $20k to replace, but, hey, you can't take it with you. My last few cars I had kept over 10 years each, so replacing after just a year (bought the 2015 used...) will be a first for me. But I can better take advantage of the tax benefit this year, not next - so that is also a consideration.

Hans.

I own both. Gen 2 is a worthy upgrade imo. Both generations have been reliable for me thus far. I have 23k miles on the gen 2 and haven't had a single hiccup. The gen 1 (53k miles) has been flawless until two weeks ago when it developed a clicking noise from the left front wheel. They're replacing the driver side axle this week under the powertrain warranty. I'd trade in the gen 1 for a 2nd gen 2, but I'm wanting to go full BEV on the next vehicle and I'm waiting for GM to offer ACC and Moonroof options for the Bolt.
 

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I just want to add, from an early impression point-of-view, that the Gen 1 felt more like a "driver's" car and the Gen 2 more of a "passenger's" car. It's smoother, more luxurious (at least with premier trim), takes bumps better, has lighter steering, is more quiet and refined. However, in doing my same routes today to/from work that I last did with my Gen 1, it's just not as much fun to toss around despite better power delivery. The suspension is less firm. This may/may not be important to you.

On the other hand, I did my entire 56 mile round trip commute entirely on battery, with 2 miles to spare (no charging at work). And that's why I own a Gen 2...
 
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