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I remember learning that it was bad for regular car engines to take short trips that do not allow the engine to fully warm up because the water created from combustion stays inside, leading to corrosion, rather than evaporating from engine heat. Every time my ICE in the Volt has come on, it's been for less than 5 miles, often less than 1 mile, when I can't quite get all the way home on the charge. Does the Volt technology have this figured out? Or maybe I'm remembering an old ICE issue that's long outdated?

Thanks.
 

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Yes I have often wondered the same thing. Even when the periodic maintenance mode kicks in, the ICE doesn't run long enough to fully warm up. One wonders about dampness accumulating, for example, in the exhaust system. But I am learning to ignore the issue, especially since I have my leased Volt for only 3 years.
 

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These are some of the reasons why the Volt was one of the first cars being spec'd with a Dexos grade synthetic engine oil which is much more tolerant of any sort of degradation due to this scenario.
There is no real issue running this engine for even short periods of time.
The materials chosen for various components in the fuel, engine, and even the exhaust systems are also less prone to any sort of corrosion as you speak of.
EMM can sometimes be as short as 4-5 minutes (and controlled by software) -not a problem
WOT
 

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I make a point running my ICE for at least 10 or 15 miles every couple of weeks to get the engine fully warmed up and evaporate gas and other crud out of the oil. I also change the oil once a year even if the oil monitor says I still have 80% remaining oil life. Some will say I'm overly protective, but I plan to keep my Volt for a long time and these measures, may not help, certainly won't hurt, and aren't expensive.
 

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I know one thing, a bunch of short trips on the ICE makes for bad MPG's! My overall ICE mileage is just under 35MPG from all those little sips of gas after my battery depletes, usually on .03-.16 gallons. But when running for 100 miles or so, my mileage has been over 42MPG!
 

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I know one thing, a bunch of short trips on the ICE makes for bad MPG's! My overall ICE mileage is just under 35MPG from all those little sips of gas after my battery depletes, usually on .03-.16 gallons. But when running for 100 miles or so, my mileage has been over 42MPG!
I totally agree.. it seems if I run till I have a flat pack then auto switch to ICE for a couple miles it goes through short warm-up then races up high.. and aboutthat time I reach my arrival...

when on a road trip it does the same but then works into a nice slow steady or slightly varying pace on the ICE.. which is best for good MPG's...
-Christopher
 
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Well, I was still at just 8.5 gallons/Gas used running into the sub 25° of late January of this year. Cabin Assisted Heating, ERDT, hard wired into my MY2012 Volt EREV used over 8.5 gallons of gas between the later part of that month and late February.

Note- All MY2013+, ERDT temp threshold now is 35°, can be stepped down to 15°-

Knocked me off the sub 35 count on the leader board at Volt Stats and ran my MPGcs to one of the lowest on the site-18.88. Boo Hoo! lol Lot of cold start driving!

Currently moving back up, now at #86. - @Amazing Chev

http://www.voltstats.net/

Thanks WopOnTour for your strong VoltTech comments as always!

With 29 years in the car business, 6 years heavily promoting the Amazing Chevy Volt EREV I am proud to promote the maximum NO-Gas potential of this machine- Promote it loudly I will!

Best-

Thomas J. Thias

Sundance Chevrolet Inc.

517-622-6081

Twitter @AmazingChevVolt
 

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Running the ICE for 10-15 mins will warm up the coolant and exhaust system totally.
But it's the oil temp that needs to be above 180°F for awhile to evaporate the moisture.

I assume the oil life monitor system is following all the short ICE cycles when moisture can accumulate in the oil.
Or does it just monitor with a real time optical oil sensor?

I'm with larry4pyro, I will be giving my Volt an oil change before the oil life monitor says to. I'll do an oil analysis to the oil for reference.
BTW, I am now a Volt owner !!!! I drove the 500 miles home in Hold, got 35.7 MPG. I used cruise, always set to 5 mph above the posted speed limit, so I was usually driving 70-80 mph. ( Just did a longer road trip with my Gen3 Prius, it would do this at ~41 MPG.) The oil life on this trip dropped from 66% to 65%. Highway miles are easy on oil life,,, could that be why the small change?

I will also be changing ATF way before the recommended interval. I'm a big geek on this subject over at Priuschat....
I'll be posting oil analysis of the ATF change when that happens.
( Is it possible the same factory is making both of these transaxles for Toyota and GM? )
 

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I make a point running my ICE for at least 10 or 15 miles every couple of weeks to get the engine fully warmed up and evaporate gas and other crud out of the oil. I also change the oil once a year even if the oil monitor says I still have 80% remaining oil life. Some will say I'm overly protective, but I plan to keep my Volt for a long time and these measures, may not help, certainly won't hurt, and aren't expensive.
I do the very same thing. Changing the oil is so dead easy on the Volt that I do it once year regardless.

I'm keeping my Volt a very long time, like I do all my cars.
 

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I will also be changing ATF way before the recommended interval.
My current thinking based on a cursory knowledge of the Volt is that the sophisticated clutches are mostly like one of the highest wear points on the car. For this reason I will also be changing the ATF way before the recommended interval. A simple procedure that might have a big payoff.
 

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My current thinking based on a cursory knowledge of the Volt is that the sophisticated clutches are mostly like one of the highest wear points on the car. For this reason I will also be changing the ATF way before the recommended interval. A simple procedure that might have a big payoff.
As you pointed out the clutches are sophisticated in the Volt. You may want to glance through these links for some comments on expected clutch wear:


http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?12870-Change-Transmission-Fluid&p=136004#post136004

http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread...regular-automatic-and-CVT&p=129238#post129238
 

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Even using a bicycle instead of driving my '93 Geo Metro for trips less than 5 miles, I had to replace the muffler prematurely. So to me this issue is important. Last time I came home I ran out of charge and the ICE ran for about a quarter mile! I was miffed.

[edit 160117] More recently I toggled into Mountain Mode when the traction charge dwindled down to one bar. Happily, it runs the ICE at a good clip even when stationary at traffic stops and it warms up very nicely.

My latest thinking is that the Volt would be more efficient with a much smaller HV battery. Running the ICE optimally and regen braking (not to forget low wind drag coefficient) give the Volt its efficiency. A heavy battery counters that, especially with gas prices as low as they are now and the $0.20/kWh we pay our local corrupt utility here in Gainesville FL.

The only thing saving the Volt in its current form with prevailing economic conditions is the option of charging photovoltaically, which I plan to implement.
 

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Congrats, you invented a normal hybrid car :)

Normal hybrids are far more efficient with gas than the Volt, but are only more efficient all around if you're driving dramatically further than the Volt's battery range on a daily basis. The problem with a tiny HV battery is that you'll never exceed 45-55mpg because you'll always need gas.

No doubt sub-$1 gas will hurt Volt sales because of your line of thinking though! It will definitely cost more to drive a Volt than a regular hybrid for at least the next 18 months until gas supply levels out and the price shoots back up.
 
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