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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
The shock absorbers can generate 100 - 400 watts of energy under normal driving conditions when installed in a medium-sized passenger car traveling at 60 mph. On particularly rough roads, up to 1600 watts can be generated. In hybrid vehicles, fuel efficiency could increase to 8 percent. Zuo and his team developed and patented two types of shock absorbers: linear and rotational. The patent is ready for licensing.

http://news.discovery.com/autos/shock-absorber-harvests-energy-bumps-110719.html

Seems like a good complement to the Volts regen brakes. I know this has been thought of and discussed somewhat before.

shockabsorber.jpg

Note the links to a revolutionary ICE engine and e cars that pay for themselves have been posted and discussed on gm-volt previously.
 

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Do they ad significant cost or weight to the car? If not, then couldn't they work in concert with solar panels (expensive) regen brakes to produce quite a bit of juice for the battery pack.
BTW... I know that solar panels don't do much for the battery, but I'm thinking that the two together could mean another 2-5 miles of range per day.... THAT COULD BE HUGE.... looking at it from a monthly standpoint... 80-100 extra miles electric... 20-30KW for free...
pipe dream now... hopefully tech can accomplish this in the future....
 

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They smell expensive.

And those wires look a little thin to carry 1600 watts.
 

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They smell expensive.

And those wires look a little thin to carry 1600 watts.
The voltage generated by a change in inductance is inversely related to the velocity of the change. A very bumpy road at a high traveling speed can generates hundreds of volts but at short duration pulses. One of those peaks can flow 1.6 KW but in about a few milliseconds, so it may not be enough power (a few watt-hours) unless you keep it up for a long time and have a battery or capacitor to store that energy. This may not be enough of a power gain, but it is regenerating some energy back instead of dissipating it as heat into the air.

Until someone actually tests them, I would not install them in my EV yet (if I had one, anyway).
 
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