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So I've been using a touch counter app on my phone to keep track of how often I shift while driving. I've been hypermiling some what using L to slow or D to maintain momentum as needed. In my stop and go commute portions I find I'm shifting on average 26.3 times/day over the last 2 weeks.

Will this prematurely wear on the shifter? I understand shifters in a manual vehicle are designed for frequent shifting, but I'm wary about automatic shifters since they maybe only shift 10 times a day (guessing).
 

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I've been doing that D & L shifting for over 90,000 miles in my 2011. No issues.
 

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I shifted the footrest on my recliner up and down about 20 times a day for 8 years, then suddenly without any warning the lever broke. LOL point being of course anything mechanical has some factor of fatigue. Perhaps the Volt shifter is sturdy enough to go 10 years shifting 25 times a day, perhaps not. Steverino seems to be giving it a good test.
 

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It'll probably be fine, but I'd recommend just to keep it in either D or L. I personally only drive in D and get up to 54 miles in my 2014 (Gen 1), which is very high for that model. The Gen 2 has regen on demand (Button on the back of the steering wheel), which is much easier to use than shifting to L. Also, it's more efficient to coast than to regen.
 

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... I've been hypermiling some what using L to slow or D to maintain momentum as needed. In my stop and go commute portions I find I'm shifting on average 26.3 times/day over the last 2 weeks....
Using the brake pedal in D does exactly the same 'slow' down function as L, without applying any friction brakes, unless you are braking beyond the displayed regen max, and maybe the swirly leaves show this also.
Only an IR reader pointed at the discs knows for sure...

Actually shifting to N may be the way to 'hypermile'. Research this on this forum.
Although, holding the Go pedal to display '0' regen may be the exact same thing as N.

As for 'wearing the shifter mechanism' ,, well, it is an old fashioned cable shifter moving linkage on top of the transaxle after all....
What do you think might eventually happen to this mechanism?
 

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Using the brake pedal in D does exactly the same 'slow' down function as L, without applying any friction brakes, unless you are braking beyond the displayed regen max, and maybe the swirly leaves show this also.
Only an IR reader pointed at the discs knows for sure...

Actually shifting to N may be the way to 'hypermile'. Research this on this forum.
Although, holding the Go pedal to display '0' regen may be the exact same thing as N.

As for 'wearing the shifter mechanism' ,, well, it is an old fashioned cable shifter moving linkage on top of the transaxle after all....
What do you think might eventually happen to this mechanism?
The only mechanical linkage between the shift lever and the transmission itself should be to set or remove the parking pawl, and even that could technically be electronic; I think it's mechanical on the Volt. R-N-D-L is all electronic switches that tell the computer what to do with the inverters. I've been nervous to switch between D/L too much because I'm afraid the switches might be cheap, but in all honesty I doubt it causes any measurable wear on the shifter more than what normal operation would.
 

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I leave it in "L" for speeds up to 45-50 and "D" for higher. There is no reason to be shifting constantly. You have regenerative braking in both the paddle and brake pedal.
 

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What ! there is a D there too
 

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since I am new to the Volt i leave it in drive to coast and use the regen paddle when I need to burn off speed. how much power is going to the wheels in D with foot off pedal?
 

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So I've been using a touch counter app on my phone to keep track of how often I shift while driving. I've been hypermiling some what using L to slow or D to maintain momentum as needed. In my stop and go commute portions I find I'm shifting on average 26.3 times/day over the last 2 weeks.

Will this prematurely wear on the shifter? I understand shifters in a manual vehicle are designed for frequent shifting, but I'm wary about automatic shifters since they maybe only shift 10 times a day (guessing).
It is better to not of course. How often are you doing this? Chances are it is entirely unnecessary to switch.
 

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..... I think it's mechanical on the Volt. R-N-D-L is all electronic switches that tell the computer what to do with the inverters. ...
Look under the hood as someone moves the shifter. You'll see the cable/bellcrank at the top of the transaxle move with each movement of the shifter. The switches are in the transaxle case. At least that's the way it was on the gen 1 Volt.

.... how much power is going to the wheels in D with foot off pedal?
Look at the display in front of you. Or config the display to show power/regen in kW.
You can simulate shifting to N by holding the Go pedal at '0 kW' displayed.

There is NO performance advantage driving it differently than a normal car: using the go and stop pedals like a normal car.

If you enjoy keeping your foot constantly planted on the Go pedal driving in L, enjoy it! But don't kid yourself you are gaining anything.
 

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Look under the hood as someone moves the shifter. You'll see the cable/bellcrank at the top of the transaxle move with each movement of the shifter. The switches are in the transaxle case. At least that's the way it was on the gen 1 Volt.


Look at the display in front of you. Or config the display to show power/regen in kW.
You can simulate shifting to N by holding the Go pedal at '0 kW' displayed.

There is NO performance advantage driving it differently than a normal car: using the go and stop pedals like a normal car.

If you enjoy keeping your foot constantly planted on the Go pedal driving in L, enjoy it! But don't kid yourself you are gaining anything.
There is actually a benefit to driving in L, but only in gas-hybrid mode. The engine prefers to remain running for a while when you're coasting (foot off pedals in D) to charge the battery, especially around 35-45 MPH. If you tap the brakes, the vehicle thinks you're about to slow down so it turns the engine off almost immediately. Of course, tapping the brakes turns your brake lights on. You can achieve this with the regen paddle, or by driving in L and backing off the gas JUST to the point where it would start to "brake" and then pressing lightly again to coast, which will coax the engine off without pulsing your brake lights.

No benefit in EV mode, of course.
 

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I do this all the time and it seems to get a bit easier to switch between L and D but no issues
Some might call that WEAR.

(Things only get 'broken-in' so much before it's considered 'WEAR'.)
 

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So I've been using a touch counter app on my phone to keep track of how often I shift while driving. I've been hypermiling some what using L to slow or D to maintain momentum as needed. In my stop and go commute portions I find I'm shifting on average 26.3 times/day over the last 2 weeks.

Will this prematurely wear on the shifter? I understand shifters in a manual vehicle are designed for frequent shifting, but I'm wary about automatic shifters since they maybe only shift 10 times a day (guessing).
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You are working too hard to enjoy your volt.
The Volt has many features to enjoy driving or attempting to get better EV mileage.
However you can overthink the car and just work yourself up to a frenzy.


From the OWNERS MANUAL

Driving and Operating page 187

D: –- This position is for normal
driving. It provides the best fuel
economy. If more power is needed
for passing, press the accelerator
pedal to gain the desired
acceleration

L : –- This position reduces vehicle
speed without using the brakes. Use
L (Low) on very steep hills, in deep
snow, in mud, or in stop-and-go
traffic.

First – What EXACTLY are you trying to accomplish???

Most Volt owners never shift at all, unless you want the feel of a sports car.

DO YOU UNDERSTAND what the volt controls do?

D --- Drive is the recommended position. According to the manual, L – offers no enhancement to driving, speed pickup, etc. it is the same as D.

However, L offers an aggressive regen braking. So much so that I have noticed a decline in High voltage battery regen compared to using the D position.

If you feel the need to aggressively slow the car as L would do, use the PADDLE on the left side under the steering wheel. The amount of regen/braking is the same as the L position on the console and you are not wearing any contacts that make the electrical connections. Generally a concern over long term use/abuse.

Speaking very generally, your gain in regen miles to the High Voltage Battery will be in D with use of the coast (adding mileage on odometer and regen to HV battery) and the soft regen/braking from the D mode. Using the aggressive regen/braking cuts the time down so fast that you lose the mileage coasting and regen/braking is limited due to how quickly the car slows down.

Alright, example: In summer temperatures around 70 ish degrees F, I drive the VOLT in D (Drive). I use Cruise Control as much as possible, it allows for fast reaction to propulsion and regen/coast on even slight hills on roads. If I don’t have a lot of traffic behind me, I allow the car to coast “ D “ to a stopsign or light.
All of this is easy to get used to, esp if you had a better model GM car with electronic mileage average and instantaneous mileage as this option actually teaches you to drive for miles. Same with the VOLT.

Proof of the example: 70 ish degrees F temperatures, I get almost constantly, an 82 (eighty Two) miles per charge, this is also verified with the odometer in real miles after a drive. ( note that real odometer miles can go above or under the EV miles estimate that is given after charging the HV battery )

If you can average 60 to 65 miles mileage the way you are driving in 70 ish degree F temperatures, then all I would change is to use the paddle as there seems no advantage using L for acceleration. If I am wrong, I am sure there will be comments to correct my error.
 

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L : –- This position reduces vehicle
speed without using the brakes. Use
L (Low) on very steep hills, in deep
snow, in mud, or in stop-and-go
traffic.
And I'm still convinced that the "deep snow" and "mud" parts are copy-pasta left over from owner manuals for vehicles with actual transmissions. There's no conceivable reason why environments of such incredibly high friction could possibly benefit from extra regen braking. You'll never be moving fast enough or long enough for it to amount to anything anyway.
 

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I don't turn my steering wheel. Just point it straight ahead.
I also don't allow my wheels to roll. I keep them stationary.
Also, I never turn the car on.

All this avoids wear. :)

Drive the car any way you want. You'll wear our the drive Mode selector before you'll wear out the shifter. It's a car, not a delicate Faberge egg.
 

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And I'm still convinced that the "deep snow" and "mud" parts are copy-pasta left over from owner manuals for vehicles with actual transmissions. There's no conceivable reason why environments of such incredibly high friction could possibly benefit from extra regen braking. You'll never be moving fast enough or long enough for it to amount to anything anyway.
I think you're right, because regen braking physically won't work in slippery environments. It has to have resistance on the wheels to work; if they start skidding, it's physically impossible for regen to actually have any effect any more.
 
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