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Discussion Starter #1
I wish to install Level 2 charging system for my 2017 Volt, but also want to be able to charge my Tesla Model 3 when it is available. Also, I have two different garage locations where I will be charging. I have not yet given my electrician instructions on what will be needed, but I was thinking a dedicated 50 AMP circuit with a plug that could be used with a portable system that I could keep in the car. I know that the Volt will not be be able to charge at the rate of the Tesla, but I guess my question is, even though the circuit will be capable of 50 Amps, can you use a cable such as the Aerovironment Turbocord? Do these EVSE systems automatically dial themselves down so they are compatible with various different vehicles?
Any help would be appreciated. I have alot to learn. I pick up my new Volt on Friday this week.
 

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Yes the EVSE will only go up to the amps allowed by the vehicle.

If you use the EVSE that comes with your 2017 Volt as a L2, it will charge at a max of 12 amps. If you use another L2 EVSE it will charge at a max of 16 amps no matter what.

I am not sure what your Tesla will charge at. But if it charges at 30 amps or less max, you could instruct your electrician to install 1 50 amp circuit with a small subpanel that has two plugs, one for each vehicle. This would save you from having to run two circuits all the way back to the main panel.

The sub panel could have a 30amp and 20 amp breaker for the Tesla and Volt respectively.

So since I am not sure on the Tesla max charge rate others will have to confirm if this will do it.
 

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You buy an EVSE appropriate for your wiring in your house (or what you want electrician to install), and the car will negotiate with the EVSE the highest rate it can handle.

So if you have a Clipper Creek HCS-40, your house wiring needs to support 40 amps (32 amps continuous) and that can charge a car like my 2012 Volt at 3.3 kw (14 amps or so) or Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid at 7.2 kw (30 amps) or a Tesla with adapter at 7.7 kw (32 amps) even though that car is capable of charging faster.

It all comes down to how fast you want to charge. Something that supports 40 amps (32 continuous) will charge around 25 miles range per hour, so you can expect a full charge of something like Bolt EV or Tesla Model 3 in 9 or 10 hours +/-. I just went with the Clipper Creek HCS-40 since I won't ever need faster charging than that no matter what vehicle I have.

Edit:
I pick HCS-40 as an example. I think we don't know the charge rate on the Model 3 yet, but Model S is 9.6 kw by default, so that needs a 50 A circuit to max out. However, you don't have to max it out if you don't care if you have slower charging rate. Again, the car negotiates with the EVSE at what rate it can charge at.
 

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After doing a little research, If you plan to charge both at the same time, you will need two circuits. A 50amp for the Tesla and another one for the Volt. Although the Volt will only go to 16 amps you might as well make them both the same to be capable of charging the Tesla on both.

As for the Turbocord, why would you buy it? Your 2017 Volt has an EVSE capable of L1 and L2 charging. The Telsa will have one as well to my understanding.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't have my car yet, but I thought the charge cord that came with it was only for L1 @ using normal household outlet. That would be great news if it also can be plugged into 240 outlet.
I will not be charging a Volt AND a Tesla at the same time. I am only trying to get set up so that down the road (if and when) I purchase the Model 3 Tesla I will be ready. So what I think I am hearing, is that I can have my electrician put in a dedicated circuit with a 50 AMP breaker (which will benefit the Tesla) but that I can still plug into this with my Volt and it can safely charge at its limit which I gather the car itself regulates?
 

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If you are trying to charge both cars off the same EVSE, buy the biggest one you can. It will negotiate the charging rate with any car (that's exactly how commercial charging stations work). The model 3 should come with an adapter that is compatible with the standard j1772 charge plug. .

So are you replacing the volt with a tesla or augmenting? As others have stated that it is useful to get two EVSEs.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I realize that I will need to have my electrician install a dedicated circuit if I wish to charge at L2 at home. Was planning to "future proof" by putting in a 50AMP circuit which I also know is more than the Volt requires. I don't have my Volt yet, so I am not sure what the charge cable looks like that comes with the car and I thought it was just for L1? Can it also plug into a 240V circuit as well?
Or do I have to buy a separate charge cord designed specifically for L2?
(just FYI...I am on the long waiting list for the Tesla Model 3 but hope to be setup to charge it at L2)
Thanks!
 

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I realize that I will need to have my electrician install a dedicated circuit if I wish to charge at L2 at home. Was planning to "future proof" by putting in a 50AMP circuit which I also know is more than the Volt requires. I don't have my Volt yet, so I am not sure what the charge cable looks like that comes with the car and I thought it was just for L1? Can it also plug into a 240V circuit as well?
Or do I have to buy a separate charge cord designed specifically for L2?
(just FYI...I am on the long waiting list for the Tesla Model 3 but hope to be setup to charge it at L2)
Thanks!
Well from the post I thought you had a 2017 Volt. But when you get one, the link below shows you how to create a conversion cord or buy one from ChrisTX. And Yes, 50 amp circuit for the Volt is overkill. However, if you get a Tesla and still want to charge the Volt at the same time you're going to need two circuit. Some clarification will help get a clear answer.

http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?218442-2016-Volt-120v-EVSE-is-L1-L2-Conversion-Capable
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the helpful link. Sounds like the stock cord that comes with the car is designed for 110 only, but COULD be modified for L2. Don't think I would want to do that so it appears the Turbocord for 240 may be a good way to go as it is portable and compact.

And just for clarity, I will have a 2017 Volt arriving Friday. About 2 years from now I hope to replace it with a Tesla...which I have placed a re-fundable deposit on.
 

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The stock EVSE for 2016+ doesn't require conversion persay just a plug adapter (about $30 to build if your handy with a screwdriver) since the 5-15 (standard 120V) plug won't go into anything designed for 240V. The turbo cord is great as a portable compact unit but it's quite expensive and far less expensive options can be had with similar performance and just a slight increase in size. There are a number of posts regarding the Duosida EVSE which can be ordered for about $200 shipped. So far the consensus is that it's a reasonably well built unit. I have one myself and it's worked flawlessly the last 6 months and does 120 as well as 240 (L1/L2)
 

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Unless you drive a significant amount of miles every day, an entry level 3.3 - 3.8 kWh L2 charger likely meet the daily needs of 99% or more of EV drivers. A 3.8 kWh ClipperCreek LCS-20 only requires 16 AMPs and could give most people 120+ miles of range (assuming their battery is big enough) overnight (10-12 hours).

Ironically, as the battery gets bigger, the need for a faster home charger goes down (unless you are the 1% who drives 150+ miles a day, every day). Most people with an EV that has a bigger battery could actually get away with 120 volt charging to keep the battery topped off every day.

The faster 40+ AMP, 6+ kWh charging at home is really only needed for those running over 150 miles a day, or topping off a smaller battery EV midday so they can reach their destination.

Teslas have the battery size to keep them from needing top speed hi AMP L2 charging at home.

Volts have the range extender, smaller battery and slower charging speed that makes higher speed EVSEs overkill as they are forced to only run at 3.6 kWh based on the volts charging capabilities.
 

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I wish to install Level 2 charging system for my 2017 Volt, but also want to be able to charge my Tesla Model 3 when it is available. Also, I have two different garage locations where I will be charging. I have not yet given my electrician instructions on what will be needed, but I was thinking a dedicated 50 AMP circuit with a plug that could be used with a portable system that I could keep in the car. I know that the Volt will not be be able to charge at the rate of the Tesla, but I guess my question is, even though the circuit will be capable of 50 Amps, can you use a cable such as the Aerovironment Turbocord? Do these EVSE systems automatically dial themselves down so they are compatible with various different vehicles?
Any help would be appreciated. I have alot to learn. I pick up my new Volt on Friday this week.
Are you planning to charge your Volt and future Tesla Model 3 at the same time? If so, then you will need two separate dedicated circuits installed in the garage. If you have two separate garages, then you might install a 50 amp dedicated circuit in each garage with a NEMA 14-50R receptacle and bring your EVSE with you when you park at the second garage location. The cord on the wall plug end of the Level II EVSE tends to be very short, i.e. 12 inches, so you might have to get creative with a means of hanging the EVSE from the wall next to the 14-50R receptacle without having the EVSE hanging by the power cord. Frequently plugging and unplugging the EVSE from the NEMA 14-50R receptacle would cause wear and you might need to eventually replace the receptacle if it became loose.

Many Volt owners who install a Level II EVSE and dedicated circuit for charging the Volt choose to future proof the dedicated circuit by installing a 50 amp circuit even though the Volt only needs a 20 amp circuit. The EVSE can be hard wired or can be plugged in to a receptacle such as the NEMA 14-50R. You can upgrade your EVSE just by unplugging the 20 amp rated EVSE for the Volt and replacing this with an EVSE capable of delivering 30amps or 40 amps, plugging in to the same NEMA 14-50R receptacle that you had installed. The Tesla Model 3 will need an adapter to work with an EVSE that has a J1772 connector.

I considered getting an EVSE rated at more than 20 amps but decided to get an EVSE that enables the Volt to charge at its maximum (3.6kw) so nothing more than a 20 amp rated EVSE is needed. I read somewhere that the expected life of an EVSE may only be 5 years, so probably by the time I replace my 2017 Volt I will want to replace the EVSE at that time too. At that time I will be retired and driving less too, so the need to be able to fully recharge a 60kwh or larger battery won't be a regular need. When I commute to my workplace I currently drive between 40 and 60 miles depending on the location, if I stay close to home I rarely drive more than 20 miles per day. My daily recharging needs are less than 5 hours, weekdays, and less than 2 hours on the weekend and that is using an EVSE that is rated for 20 amps.
 

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One potential solution...
Clipper Creek now offers their "Share2" enabled 40A charger bundle
https://store.clippercreek.com/all-products/Share2-HCS-40-Bundle
This permits 2 EVSE's to be connected to the some 40A 2P breaker
When charging 1 car it will charge at the full 32A (or less depending on car's maximum)
When charging 2 cars it will automatically throttle them both back to 16A maximum
When either finishes charging the remaining will again throttle up to 32A max

Tested this system out recently at an EV event - it works!

WOT
 

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I installed a 50-amp circuit into a sub-panel. In this way, I can have multiple 240v outlets in bay1, bay2, and outside. Since it would be unusual to have multiple cars charging at once (I only have one car), I over-subscribed the sub-panel (rated at 125amps) with three 40-amp circuits. Yeah, not exactly code, but, it works for me.

@WOT. Didn't know about that dual-head charger. Interesting.
 

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One potential solution...
Clipper Creek now offers their "Share2" enabled 40A charger bundle
https://store.clippercreek.com/all-products/Share2-HCS-40-Bundle
This permits 2 EVSE's to be connected to the some 40A 2P breaker
When charging 1 car it will charge at the full 32A (or less depending on car's maximum)
When charging 2 cars it will automatically throttle them both back to 16A maximum
When either finishes charging the remaining will again throttle up to 32A max

Tested this system out recently at an EV event - it works!

WOT
I know a guy in Oregon who built a box where you plug in the j1772 cord from the public charger and out of it are two j1772 plugs. It will split the charging equally between two cars until one car is fully charged then send the full current (or whatever the car will handle) to the second. Alas trying to convince someone that this home fabricated device in a sheet metal box is perfectly safe is the challenge. He swears by it but it obviously isn't UL listed or anything
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Install a 14-50 for a future Tesla. Use a Level 2 adapter, which allows your stock EVSE to charge on that 14-50 outlet. No modifications needed, and it's plug and play.
Thanks Chris. It looks like you know exactly what I need since you own both a Tesla and a Volt. Is there a particular adapter that you would recommend for my stock Volt cord ? (one that can be purchased ready to go)...or is this something my electrician needs to build?
 

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Thanks Chris. It looks like you know exactly what I need since you own both a Tesla and a Volt. Is there a particular adapter that you would recommend for my stock Volt cord ? (one that can be purchased ready to go)...or is this something my electrician needs to build?
You have a PM.
 

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ChrisTX - your welcome :)

hopefully he will be a future satisfied customer.
 
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