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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Not far. 5-6 miles. GoM dropped about 4 miles. When I pick it up for testing I'll get it on the expressway see how that goes.
 

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I think the GOM will settle a little north of 30 miles, my guess based on the 4 mile drop on a 5-6 mile drive.

The expressway is not the best way to test it, as the efficiency is decreased above about 45 mph. But if you can drive it far enough to get a full electric discharge, that will help you learn a bit.

More than miles, see how many kwh the battery produces before depletion. I typically see about 10.3 on my 2013, the 2011 will be a bit less.

I think, given your context, you will be more at peace with having the dealer look it over. Hopefully they will have a decent Volt tech.

I am still a recent Volt owner, and am still learning, so that is about all I have to offer. Best to you.
 

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Yeah, we call it a GOM for a very legit reason.

Mine usually reads 45+ at the house, I drive 30 miles and use almost 10kWh to get to work. Then it'll read ~30 when I leave work, but ill only use just over 5kWh to get home. I work 1200ft higher than my home, the GOM gets easily skewed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Well I have the car for the night, anything I should check? Taking it into my Chevy dealer in the AM for an inspection. Told it takes about 3 hours, so I will know more after that.
 

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Drive it at least the full electric range on a full charge. Try everything, climate controls, windows, doors, electronics, etc. Drive over a few bumps. That is all I have to emphasize.
 

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Make sure the heat works while in electric mode. There is an electric pump that is prone to failure that is used during heat request while in electric mode. I learned this the hard way when I bought a used Volt in summer. I also learned that I could fix my own electric car too when I replaced said pump myself. Once the engine warms up, this pump is bypassed and you get lots of heat. ICE are great for wasting making heat.
 

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Just on principle and without knowing anything, I would look for a 2013 and up model. Won't be that much more expensive, will have two years fewer on traction battery and has nicer features.
 
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2012 Volt Premium (Cyber Gray Metallic) - Stock
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Just on principle and without knowing anything, I would look for a 2013 and up model. Won't be that much more expensive, will have two years fewer on traction battery and has nicer features.
+1. If you can get one that's still under Voltec warranty, that's the way I would go. My 2012 checked out perfectly at a reputable dealership before purchase, and it has been the single most expensive car (with regards to repairs) I have ever owned. Just the battery alone will set you back as much as these are going for on the used market.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Well it's mine. Dealership ran all the diagnostics, no issues, batteries are in good shape. Drove it a good deal today and still have a supposed 10 more miles to go. All in all I feel pretty good about it. I had considered a slightly newer one, but all are 25-50% more than the $5k I paid. Exterior and interior are in mint condition, someone put a lot of care into the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Interesting, the GOM has been steadily going up over the past few days. Getting to 30 on the GOM on a charge would be nice. At 28 now.

I haad read through the manual, more a skim, but I thought I saw something about resetting the system for a new driver, anyone know if that exists?
 

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Interesting, the GOM has been steadily going up over the past few days. Getting to 30 on the GOM on a charge would be nice. At 28 now.

I haad read through the manual, more a skim, but I thought I saw something about resetting the system for a new driver, anyone know if that exists?
I don't know if that is necessary. The car will eventually adjust to you. When I bought mine used at a Honda dealership the GOM was around 45 Km. After I bought it, it went up to 60 Km. used it once a month where I would deplete battery and ICE would start and drive the last couple miles to Costco. Park it. Drive to Mall, Charge a bit on free chargers, drive to meeting, go home on ICE after I was on the highway. During COVID, meetings were cancelled, got my first EMMs then eventually FMM. Now that the weather has warmed up that I don't use heater first thing in the morning, the GOM has gone up to 62 Km. Never been that high before even though nothing has changed other than no EV to ICE change overs. Often I will start at 60-62 Km and drive the 9 km into town and it will still be at 60 to 62 Kms (60 Kph speed limit, rolling up and down road with end point higher than starting. It will even out by the end of trip to just above half battery.

The point of it is, it is not unusual for GOM to go up after you purchase it. Battery/range has remained constant for last three years since purchase without going into OBDII.
 

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I had read through the manual, more a skim, but I thought I saw something about resetting the system for a new driver, anyone know if that exists?
Perhaps what you read about "resetting the system" refers to the Lifetime MPG you see on the center console energy usage display. If the previous owner has driven a lot on gas, that number may be very low and goes up very slowly, so the new owner sometimes wants to "erase that number and start over." The GM service department can do that (and, I think, there’s an app that would allow you to do it). If you do that, you lose the ability to learn the car’s lifetime gas consumption.

Don’t know how you feel about a "gas mileage" type number for a car that can, but does not need, to use gas. MPG for the Volt is a rather meaningless number (odometer reading / total gas used), so a high MPG mostly indicates you drive a lot on battery power, and a low number means you rarely recharge and just drive on gas, or you drive beyond battery range a lot. (A more useful number is the MPGcs, the gas mileage you get when actually using gas, i.e., total gas miles/total gas used.)

If you reset the Lifetime MPG the energy usage display will reflect your MPG from that point forward (I think the car’s computer continues to track the car’s MPG). However, if this is reset, you lose the ability to calculate your Volt’s lifetime gas consumption, i.e.:

odometer miles / Lifetime MPG = Lifetime Gas Used (in gallons)

another use for that data: Lifetime Gas Used in gallons = the number of Electric Miles you must drive without using any gas to increase the Lifetime MPG by 1.0000.

Example, if your Volt odometer reading is 163,000 miles and the Lifetime MPG = 100.6, then:
163,000/100.6 = lifetime 1,620.3 gallons used

and if you add 1,620.3 Electric Miles to that odometer reading without using any gas,
odometer 164,620.3 miles / 1,620.3 gallons = 101.6 MPG
 

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I expect that it will serve you well. The price was good.

Don't sweat the GOM, it will relearn according to your habits in a very short time.
 

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You can easily reset trip A or B in the Driver Information Center (DIC). As well as trip distance, these trip meters also show total fuel consumption from last reset point. Divide trip miles by fuel consumed to get your "lifetime" MPG. Welcome to the club!
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
First interesting trip. Took it out last night to a relative's place about 35 miles away, had 20 miles on the gom. Engine kicked in as it should, but got caught in the heaviest downpour I've seen in years. Sever road flooding. People on the expressway where pulling off to the shoulders. Got into a small town, Holly MI and there was a line of cars stopped, they were all pondering if it was safe to go through some deep water, most took it slow. I was unsure but the Volt soldiered through no issues. Did get a bit concerned when going up some hills I heard some engine noise that would come and go. Doing research here I guess that is normal when there is extra demand.

All in all the Volt handled very well in the extreme weather. My brother had me check the DOT date on the tires and it's from mid 2020, so relatively new tires to boot. So far I am more than happy with the purchase.
 

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On a related issue, is there any real advantage other then time for getting a level 2 charger? My utility will give me a $500 rebate on a CPH25-L18-P Charge Point Wi-fi level 2 unit, The recommend unit has a 5 week waiting period and shows the price as $619 so not too bad after rebate. I'm on a TOD rate plan, and could easily put the 110 charger on a smart plug, or let my utility control it with the level 2. My rate goes up 50% between 2-7 PM in the summer.
Get the charge point. It's universal except for lease and you may get another EV at some point. My utility installed mine and covered 80%. I had them put in a cable that was rated for 50 amps even though I can only draw 30 at this point. With a plug in charge point you can change easily - or bring it with you somewhere. In fact the utility changed mine out when the first charge point had electronic issues.
 

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You can easily reset trip A or B in the Driver Information Center (DIC). As well as trip distance, these trip meters also show total fuel consumption from last reset point. Divide trip miles by fuel consumed to get your "lifetime" MPG. Welcome to the club!
That’s "trip" MPG, not "lifetime" MPG. Once you reset the trip A or B counter, you zero out any previous distance and gas consumption, so you lose the ability to use those trip counters to show your vehicle’s "lifetime" MPG. That’s the same reason you should not reset the energy usage display’s Lifetime MPG reading.
 
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