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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Recently drove my X over 3400 miles and 95% of that was using auto-pilot (Northern states). It was an excellent road tripping vehicle and the trip planner built-in software worked well. I would put in where I was going to stay and it sets waypoints at charging station locations along the route and told me how long to spend at each one to have about a 10% buffer. Time varied from 20-30 minutes and I charged longer usually at lunch. Sometimes I would have an appetizer at other stops as they were always by a few restaurants.

Traveled anywhere from 170 miles to 540 miles per day without issues. Varied based on if I was at the beginning of my roadtrip or at the end. I was visiting friends and family along they way and at my turnaround destination. At a family destination I plugged into a 50 amp (40 amp usage) for a air_compressor/welder and at a siblings dryer in the mountain cabin.

Happy to answer any questions.

P.S. I really love my 2011 Volt that my son is now driving and drove my wife's 2016 Volt 711 miles the day I bought it out of state. The Tesla is just at a whole other level.

Example of when auto-pilot worked perfectly and I could enjoy the view!!

 

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Sounds very cool. I think it goes without saying that if I paid three to four times what I paid for the Volt, I'd expect that level of service and support.

Maybe I'm just being a bit arcane, but I actually prefer to plan long road trips out myself. I can definitely see the value for "virgin" routes in a pure BEV, because I can already see some of the difficulties of planning routes for my future Bolt.

Most of these features are available in the Model S as well, correct?
 

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Being an explorer of remote wilderness areas, I am screwed. I cannot find more than a few charging stations from Colorado through Wyoming, Montana, and Alberta. Since I will be staying overnight in primitive Forest Service campgrounds, I will likely be burning gasoline in my 2013 Volt for 3,000 miles this summer.
 

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Being an explorer of remote wilderness areas, I am screwed. I cannot find more than a few charging stations from Colorado through Wyoming, Montana, and Alberta. Since I will be staying overnight in primitive Forest Service campgrounds, I will likely be burning gasoline in my 2013 Volt for 3,000 miles this summer.
Don't most campsites have 240V RV power hookups? My L2 clipper creek with a couple adapters for different style 240V outlets would help if I was worried about it... I would think more about it with a Bolt, Tesla, or Leaf... never really looked into it with the Volt.

Keith
 

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That is awesome Scott, thanks for sharing!
Regarding the Navigations estimated time to charge, did you find it pretty accurate?

When it first came out, it was ok, but not very good under non-average situations (excessive temps, altitude changes, etc).
I really haven't tried it since last year (no trips more than one supercharger away).

Great to hear about your good experiences. We are picking ours up this afternoon!
 

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Don't most campsites have 240V RV power hookups? My L2 clipper creek with a couple adapters for different style 240V outlets would help if I was worried about it... I would think more about it with a Bolt, Tesla, or Leaf... never really looked into it with the Volt.

Keith
Most of the rural campgrounds in WY have no power whatsoever. If you are lucky they might have a well with a hand pump, but that is at the more major places. There are a lot of very rural places in WY, Montana, etc. No cell coverage or anything. The primitive forest service campgrounds are just a parking spot and a place to set your tent. Maybe a fire pit.
 

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Scott,

Thanks for sharing. We will be picking up our X on 6/15 and then I will be returning to NY (1400 mile trip) on 6/20. Without further comment, Mark Z decided to share that he chose his Escalade over his Teslas to take his long distance trip, so it was nice to read a positive commentary about the logistics of dealing with superchargers and trip planning. Far too much X bashing here lately, with even this thread shifting off to unrelated material (the crash has NOTHING to do with Scott's trip- seems like a predisposition to negativity to me).

When I drove a trailer full of furniture from FL to my son's in TX two weeks ago, and then drove unencumbered from TX to NY, I kept thinking about the upcoming ability to use autopilot...(although, when in tow mode, I do believe manual stated that autopilot was unavailable). Long distance driving will be the biggest winner with autopilot, or so I expect.
 

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Recently drove my X over 3400 miles and 95% of that was using auto-pilot (Northern states). It was an excellent road tripping vehicle and the trip planner built-in software worked well. I would put in where I was going to stay and it sets waypoints at charging station locations along the route and told me how long to spend at each one to have about a 10% buffer.
I used to think "who need autopilot, blah blah blah" then I saw video reviews of Model S and Model X with autopilot and how it works and fell in love! What ever I end up with (CPO S, or new 3) it will have autopilot :) Did you have any problems with it where you had to take control or was the 5% where you drove yourself just getting too and from highways?

On the route planning, if you get to a supercharger and it would only take half an hour of charging to get to the next one in the planned route but you charge all the way up while eating lunch instead of only half way does it reconfigure the route plan, perhaps skipping the next planned stop and going further on down the line? Or does it stick with the plan it already figured out?

Thanks,

Keith
 

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I used to think "who need autopilot, blah blah blah" then I saw video reviews of Model S and Model X with autopilot and how it works and fell in love! What ever I end up with (CPO S, or new 3) it will have autopilot :) Did you have any problems with it where you had to take control or was the 5% where you drove yourself just getting too and from highways?

On the route planning, if you get to a supercharger and it would only take half an hour of charging to get to the next one in the planned route but you charge all the way up while eating lunch instead of only half way does it reconfigure the route plan, perhaps skipping the next planned stop and going further on down the line? Or does it stick with the plan it already figured out?

Thanks,

Keith
There are actually many great YouTube video's on this subject. The basic rule is to only charge about 10% more than the built-in Nav/Trip Planner says is needed to the next SC. That last 20% of charging the battery full takes about as long as going from 0 to 80%. Charging speed tapers off greatly after about 80% it wastes time and is not good for the battery. Or down load evtriplanner.com and plan a few trips and you'll get the hang of it.
 

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Possible exception to that being a Supercharger like Montreal, where skipping it avoids fighting your way downtown and back out, vs. routing around the city core.

I covered just under 2000 miles over Memorial Day weekend, I was seriously wishing for autopilot by the end.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
That is awesome Scott, thanks for sharing!
Regarding the Navigations estimated time to charge, did you find it pretty accurate?
I had very good luck with it. When it is supercharging you can actually have the "trip" tab up and you can see it go from negative to 10% buffer and then it will tell you can you can leave to get to the next supercharger or your destination.

Usually I was off to the bathroom, an appetizer, a walk, lunch, etc when it was charging tho. When I would come back I would watch that graph a little. Often I would leave at 15% or so buffer depending on where I was and the speed limit. MT is 80 for example. I would often go 70-75 so I would use a little more than the estimation since I think it is based on 65.

One time I slowed down going from Big Timber to Belt because I wanted to try the ride to 7000 ft elevation (see PURPLE box). You could go around to the East or West and I have a friend that does that. He never tried up the 'Mtn'. I charged to about 99% before leaving Big Timber. I gain like 90% back coming down and it was a beautiful drive with snow still on top.



 

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Discussion Starter #12
Don't most campsites have 240V RV power hookups?
Yes, and indeed in the Tesla comes with the NEMA 14-50 4 prong plug (RV). I stayed at a KOA on my very first night for the fun of it.

I manually adjusted the amperage draw from 40 down to 22 amps until I saw the time estimate match when I was planning on getting up in the morning. I showered at night there then woke up, brushed my teeth and such then drove away. $20.
 

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I have a question since I know just about nothing about autopilot. Did autopilot drive the car at the speed limit or were you controlling your speed?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Scott,

Thanks for sharing. We will be picking up our X on 6/15 and then I will be returning to NY (1400 mile trip) on 6/20. Without further comment, Mark Z decided to share that he chose his Escalade over his Teslas to take his long distance trip, so it was nice to read a positive commentary about the logistics of dealing with superchargers and trip planning. Far too much X bashing here lately, with even this thread shifting off to unrelated material (the crash has NOTHING to do with Scott's trip- seems like a predisposition to negativity to me).

When I drove a trailer full of furniture from FL to my son's in TX two weeks ago, and then drove unencumbered from TX to NY, I kept thinking about the upcoming ability to use autopilot...(although, when in tow mode, I do believe manual stated that autopilot was unavailable). Long distance driving will be the biggest winner with autopilot, or so I expect.
It was my very first multi-day trip so I planned quite a bit in order to drive out a little slower (stopped at Custer, SD Tesla meetup), then visited family in northern MT (welding plug when staying at brothers house and dryer outlet in sisters cabin at Glacier National Park area).

I used evtripplanner browser tool as well as https://www.myscenicdrives.com/ which understand some electric car stuff. I'm a past developer so I played with a google sheet and got a script to calculate miles between addresses. I then just figured out my starts (green), waypoint driving (yellow) and stops (red). Obviously a belt and suspender case. Reality was if I had a general idea where I wanted to stop I could just plug that in the Tesla built-in "trip planner" tool and it would show me the routes and times to stop at each charger (just enough to get to next one/destination). I could adjust from there.


My spreadsheet with google script to calculate the distance between superchargers (SC). Actually addresses were off the the left in that spreadsheet.

 

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
I used to think "who need autopilot, blah blah blah" then I saw video reviews of Model S and Model X with autopilot and how it works and fell in love! What ever I end up with (CPO S, or new 3) it will have autopilot :) Did you have any problems with it where you had to take control or was the 5% where you drove yourself just getting too and from highways?

On the route planning, if you get to a supercharger and it would only take half an hour of charging to get to the next one in the planned route but you charge all the way up while eating lunch instead of only half way does it reconfigure the route plan, perhaps skipping the next planned stop and going further on down the line? Or does it stick with the plan it already figured out?
It was stunning how well it worked on reasonably painted roads. I took I90 east/west. I almost trusted it too much as I communicated with family on the way to/from. I90 hardly had any traffic ... it was odd but often there was noone around me (to the side or me trailing them). PLEASE NOTE: I virtually always kept one hand on the wheel and could hold the phone up at chin level to see the road. It was amazing solid driving experience and REALLY kept centered in the lanes.... can say that for the drivers around me sometimes.

There were an occasion semi-truck pealed of tire to avoid or construction barrels (it didn't handle them but did if there were also temp lines).

It will reconfigure the route. Sometimes I would use Waze too (crowdsource warnings about traffic or something in the road!). I would sometimes figure out slightly different routes. See my post above where I had 3 options from big timber, mt to belt, mt (on way to great falls).

Update: Generally I was manually driving around town or on/off highways. Took my brother-in-law from small town to glacier national park and it drove like 97% of the time. Some roads were pretty winding. Occasionally through tight road construction I would take over too.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have a question since I know just about nothing about autopilot. Did autopilot drive the car at the speed limit or were you controlling your speed?
I controlled my speed. Often 70 or 75. If you are on some rural road or non-divided highway then sometimes it will limit it to 5 mph over the speedlimit. Generally I did not go the speedlimit (ie. 80 in MT).

Auto-pilot really blows me away on how comfortable it made the trip. I drove 400 miles on a couple days on the way back and 500 miles on the way back (to see a relative coming to my home). 500 miles was fairly easily with auto-pilot.

I think typically I'd prefer 350 or something. If I was sightseeing I would do a lot less. Example: I stayed at Murdo, SD before driving to Custer, SD for the Tesla Meetup (~60 cars showed up). That was only 170 miles away. I went to the Pioneer Auto Museum in Murdo, SD before I went to Custer, SD that day. It was an absolutely stunning place. Hundreds of cars ... many you never heard of. There were 100s of car companies since the late 1800s ... that all have gone out of the business. Irony with me driving a Tesla trying to break in.
 

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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
Why the putzing? 'Fuel Economy' reasons?
It is odd in a fully electric because
... the faster you go the sooner you get there BUT the longer you have to charge at your waypoint/supercharger
... the slower you go the later you get there AND the shorter you have to charge at your waypoint/supercharger

So the time is not crazy different in the whole grand scheme of things. 72 was one number people found for optimum speed/recharge_time in the Model S. Not sure it is true in the X. I just played with the speed. If you go a little slower then my thought was auto-pilot could react faster too ... for things like cornering. HTH explain.

One example of this but not the 72mph one: https://teslaowner.wordpress.com/2014/12/09/driving-charging-time/
 

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I controlled my speed. Often 70 or 75. If you are on some rural road or non-divided highway then sometimes it will limit it to 5 mph over the speedlimit. Generally I did not go the speedlimit (ie. 80 in MT).
If it doesn't control your speed in general, how and why did it limit you to 5 MPH over in those places?
 
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