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The decision, hinted at for years, comprises at least 3,500 fast chargers at 600 sites and at least 10,000 slower-charging “waypoints” at campsites, motels, hiking trailheads, and the like — all installed by 2024.


Pretty impressive, I think they will pull it off.

For comparison, Tesla has 9,723 fast-charging cords in the U.S., according to the latest Energy Department tally. The other networks combined have just 7,589 outlets for public charging, and those are far less widely scattered.
 

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The decision, hinted at for years, comprises at least 3,500 fast chargers at 600 sites and at least 10,000 slower-charging “waypoints” at campsites, motels, hiking trailheads, and the like — all installed by 2024.


Pretty impressive, I think they will pull it off.

For comparison, Tesla has 9,723 fast-charging cords in the U.S., according to the latest Energy Department tally. The other networks combined have just 7,589 outlets for public charging, and those are far less widely scattered.
Canada has 5,000 charging sites (L2 and L3). Since we have 1/10th the population, the US should have 50,000 charging sites to be comparable not the current 17,000 charging sites. Only 30% of the amount Canada has (by population). No wonder Americans are complaining about not enough charging sites.
 

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I won't let this thread get dragged into a political debate, but the proposed American Jobs Plan calls for building and installing 500,000 charging stations in the US. Whether the plan will pass and what it still contains if it does remain to be seen of course. Besides helping the transition to EV's, the plan is also an attempt to catch up with China, which has already invested $60 billion in EV's and EV infrastructure.
 

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Without it becoming a political debate, a country has to take the bull by the horns to direct it's companies in the direction it wants to go. China does it, Europe does it, virtually every one does it. Letting private industry try to find its way, wandering around in the hinterland no longer can compete with government directed goals.
 

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Without it becoming a political debate, a country has to take the bull by the horns to direct it's companies in the direction it wants to go. China does it, Europe does it, virtually every one does it. Letting private industry try to find its way, wandering around in the hinterland no longer can compete with government directed goals.
One word to the contrary: Tesla.
 

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Tesla SC stations only service Teslas. Good for those with a Tesla but hardly a unified national policy that broadly caters to all EV's.
China has one nationwide EV fast charging standard, known as China GB/T. The United States has two EV fast charging standards: CHAdeMO, SAE Combo, plus Tesla.
 

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Tesla SC stations only service Teslas. Good for those with a Tesla but hardly a unified national policy that broadly caters to all EV's.
China has one nationwide EV fast charging standard, known as China GB/T. The United States has two EV fast charging standards: CHAdeMO, SAE Combo, plus Tesla.
FI Spyder stated only governments can provide the necessary "incentives". The implication being the private sector either cannot or will not. Tesla has demonstrated otherwise. IMO Tesla has done more to move EV technology forward than any government mandate.
 

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FI Spyder stated only governments can provide the necessary "incentives".
I reviewed the posts, he did not say only governments can provide the necessary "incentives".

a country has to take the bull by the horns to direct it's companies in the direction it wants to go. China does it, Europe does it, virtually every one does it. Letting private industry try to find its way, wandering around in the hinterland no longer can compete with government directed goals.
Your point seems to be that Tesla is doing OK, so the US as a country is fine. But one company against the concerted efforts of a country like China with national plans to dominate every aspect of the EV industry won't cut it as a USA plan of action. That approach seems like fighting WW2 by having each state mount its own response, rather than a coordinated national response. Look, Mississippi will fight the war. No matter how good Mississippi will be fighting the war, it pales in comparison to a unified national navy, airforce, army response.

Tesla, no matter how good, can't take on China's EV industrial policy juggernaut. It can only take on some of the other EV players.
 

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FI Spyder stated only governments can provide the necessary "incentives". The implication being the private sector either cannot or will not. Tesla has demonstrated otherwise. IMO Tesla has done more to move EV technology forward than any government mandate.
Tesla is one company out of millions, and yes they have done a lot to promote EVs. I was referring to not just EVs but a whole host of issues like Taiwan did with promoting the manufacturing industry of circuit boards, Koreans did with TVs, Chinese did with securing rare earth metals necessary for modern electronics, cobalt and lithium supplies for batteries, pursuing EV technology. You need government to identify what it needs for the country to succeed and direct and aid companies to that end rather than leave it up to companies alone in a piecemeal fashion. Without that direction you are fighting the headwinds from other companies that have that direction and backing. This is the new world order. It isn't the 1960's any more and you can't win in the 21st century using 20th century tactics. You are going to be behind the 8 ball. Tesla is losing ever more market share in an ever increasing pie. When looked at in a microcosm, they have done very well. When looked at in the world wide setting not so much. Just think where they'd be if they didn't have to deal what they had to deal with. They could have been so much further ahead. Now that the Chinese have gotten a foot hold in the EV market, don't think that they won't exploit it. I remember a few years ago a documentary of a guy and a woman would travel two different routes in a country in two different types of vehicles and when they did China, the guy visited an electric car plant and this was before most people had heard of Tesla. Now China has half of the world's EV market.
 

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I reviewed the posts, he did not say only governments can provide the necessary "incentives".



Your point seems to be that Tesla is doing OK, so the US as a country is fine. But one company against the concerted efforts of a country like China with national plans to dominate every aspect of the EV industry won't cut it as a USA plan of action. That approach seems like fighting WW2 by having each state mount its own response, rather than a coordinated national response. Look, Mississippi will fight the war. No matter how good Mississippi will be fighting the war, it pales in comparison to a unified national navy, airforce, army response.

Tesla, no matter how good, can't take on China's EV industrial policy juggernaut. It can only take on some of the other EV players.
What he said.
 

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I reviewed the posts, he did not say only governments can provide the necessary "incentives".
No, he did not explicitly say incentives, hence the quotes I placed around that word. Are you going to drag this discussion down arguing words and not the message?

Your point seems to be that Tesla is doing OK, so the US as a country is fine. But one company against the concerted efforts of a country like China with national plans to dominate every aspect of the EV industry won't cut it as a USA plan of action. That approach seems like fighting WW2 by having each state mount its own response, rather than a coordinated national response. Look, Mississippi will fight the war. No matter how good Mississippi will be fighting the war, it pales in comparison to a unified national navy, airforce, army response.

Tesla, no matter how good, can't take on China's EV industrial policy juggernaut. It can only take on some of the other EV players.
My point is that Tesla, as a private company, has been leading the way despite the lack of government mandates. Your "analogy" is not.
 

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Installing charging stations is one thing. Keeping them maintained and working properly is another story entirely.
 

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You too can put your home charging station on the map and invite strangers to come charge their vehicle at your house!
That ought to put a dent on the charging infrastructure issue. ;)
 

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The decision, hinted at for years, comprises at least 3,500 fast chargers at 600 sites and at least 10,000 slower-charging “waypoints” at campsites, motels, hiking trailheads, and the like — all installed by 2024.


Pretty impressive, I think they will pull it off.

For comparison, Tesla has 9,723 fast-charging cords in the U.S., according to the latest Energy Department tally. The other networks combined have just 7,589 outlets for public charging, and those are far less widely scattered.
Pretty impressive ... talk. This company has produced anything to plug in. I'll keep by home chargers, thank you. BTW, Tesla has fast chargers AND overnight charges too. Don't ask me how I know this. LOL.
 

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