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Discussion Starter #1
I've been unable to get any regen in reverse. Has anyone else confirmed that? Are the motor magnets setup to where it's just not possible?
 

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No regen in reverse. It would not be worth the complexity of doing so...
 

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No. You don't do much braking in reverse. You aren't slowing down much in reverse so regen would be negligible. You need to use the rear disc brakes a bit since they get used less than the fronts, they will rust (more so in wet or salty winter conditions) and you will have to replace the discs not because they are grooved or worn but because they are rusty. This has to be done in a lot of instances because people don't condition their brakes by using them enough. No regen in neutral and reverse allows that to be done as you are relying strictly on the mechanical braking. I checked the availability of Raybestos caliper mounting bolts the other day and they don't stock any in Canada for the fronts because they aren't needed (discs not replaced) but do for the rears because they have to (should be) replaced when replacing the rear rusty discs.
 

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How do you condition the rear disc brakes? For the front ones, I am assuming you go at some speed, switch to N and press the brake pedal. But the rear brakes are also engaged during that time, depending on how fast I am going?
 

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How do you condition the rear disc brakes? For the front ones, I am assuming you go at some speed, switch to N and press the brake pedal. But the rear brakes are also engaged during that time, depending on how fast I am going?
The rear brakes always engage, albeit proportionately at 70 - 80% front 20 - 30 % rear. Otherwise the vehicle would exhibit severe over braking by the front brakes and the rear end would come around causing the vehicle to spin out of control on wet and slippery pavement; not unlike a severe over steer condition.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How do you condition the rear disc brakes? For the front ones, I am assuming you go at some speed, switch to N and press the brake pedal. But the rear brakes are also engaged during that time, depending on how fast I am going?
In N all 4 brakes will engage. There really is no need to "condition" your brakes in a modern car. Even with regen you will use them enough in regular driving so they will not rust in any premature way.
 

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In N all 4 brakes will engage. There really is no need to "condition" your brakes in a modern car. Even with regen you will use them enough in regular driving so they will not rust in any premature way.
Depending where you are. People in Ontario and Quebec sometimes have to replace the rear discs because of the salt on the roads in winter. Just look at the ads for their used Volts and you'll see a lot of rusty calipers. If you don't use your brakes hard enough or do braking in N or R they will rust. This would apply to anywhere where they salt the roads.
 

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In N all 4 brakes will engage. There really is no need to "condition" your brakes in a modern car. Even with regen you will use them enough in regular driving so they will not rust in any premature way.
I'm not sure that's a fair statement.

I currently drive a 2010 VW golf TDI/6 spd manual. I've regularly had issues with significant corrosion on the rear disks because I rarely have to touch my brakes (IE: always engine breaking, I've had more then one mechanic express surprise/go looking for issues, and find they're just never worked out). You can absolutely have issues on a modern car with rear brakes being underutilized.
 

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I back up too fast once on my Spark EV, and code a yellow service engine light that went away once I moved forward...
 

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Regarding regen in reverse, keep in mind the amount of regen created is related to the car’s momentum, i.e., how fast it is going at that point, not how long it has been moving at that speed. On level terrain, regenerative braking captures a portion of the energy used to accelerate the car. Most driving in reverse, I submit, is done at slow speeds. Little energy is used to accelerate in reverse, and only a portion of that would be recaptured via regenerative braking.
 

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Technically a generator sould be able to generate energy in anydirection it rotates. I guess the energy control module have the regenerative braking disabled in reverse on porpuse
 
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