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Trying to decide what battery to buy. Dealer wants $400 to replace. However I found several options at autozone or checker that their site shows for roughly $150. Is there really a difference? Im leaning towards the non GM as this is the only battery I've had ever go completely dead in under 4 years. I know that's what most are rated for. But ive had several last 5-8 years when buying aftermarket. Thoughts?

Also does anyone have the step buy step to replace it. Seems straightforward, not any harder than any other battery I've replaced over the years, but want to be sure im not missing a key step.
 

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I never thought about this, but in one sense, cold cranking amps probably doesn't matter in the volt's case as there is no traditional starter using that battery. In he past, I used to buy the biggest CCA that would fit in that spot, but who knows whether that would help or hurt in this case.
 

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Has to be a sealed battery (agm), that's why they are more expensive than traditional batteries, the autozone for $150 is just as good as buying from the stealership
 

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Trying to decide what battery to buy. Dealer wants $400 to replace. However I found several options at autozone or checker that their site shows for roughly $150. Is there really a difference? Im leaning towards the non GM as this is the only battery I've had ever go completely dead in under 4 years. I know that's what most are rated for. But ive had several last 5-8 years when buying aftermarket. Thoughts?

Also does anyone have the step buy step to replace it. Seems straightforward, not any harder than any other battery I've replaced over the years, but want to be sure im not missing a key step.
More than likely whatever battery you buy was manufactured by Johnson Controls...:rolleyes:

Johnson Controls is the leading supplier of batteries to many of the largest aftermarket battery retailers, including Advance Auto Parts, DAISA S.A., AutoZone, Costco, NAPA, Interstate Batteries, Walmart and more. Powering virtually every type of passenger car, light truck and utility vehicle, our batteries are globally sold under private labels, as well as our own brands – VARTA®, Heliar®, LTH®, MAC® and OPTIMA®.

http://bestbatterytips.com/tags/who-makes-die-hard-batteries/

"Johnson controls also makes some or all of these batteries as well.
Acura, Advance Auto Parts, Autocraft, Western Auto, Tough One, Alliance, American Hardware, Ames, Varta, Blains Farm & Fleet, Battery Alliance, Bosch, Carrefour(Europe), Champion, Amara Raja Batteries LTD(Joint venture with Johnson Controls India).
Varta, Optima Batteries, LTH, and Heliar are all battery manufactures owned by Johnson Controls.
Johnson Controls supplies Ford Motor company, Diamler Chrysler, Honda, Toyota, Nissan, and Isuzu with original equipment batteries. So next time you go and buy a battery, or a automobile chances are its a battery made by Johnson Controls."
 

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Well, dealers do soak car owners for nearly everything. The dealer is the highest price you could pay for replacement parts - period. Autozone is a great battery supplier, and if easy enough, will replace the battery too.
 

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The originals installed are always the worst.

Their is zero incentive for the manufacturer to put in a long term battery of any kind. Just the minimum to get you off the lot and into your garage. Nice point about the cold crank amps - no real need for the Volt, just longevity.
 

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Well, dealers do soak car owners for nearly everything. The dealer is the highest price you could pay for replacement parts - period. Autozone is a great battery supplier, and if easy enough, will replace the battery too.
Not true. If your battery replacement involves the two posts and some bolt holding the battery down, they will change it. My Cadillac deville had a metal triangle with 4 simple bolts obstructing the battery and Autozone refused to touch it. I had to take it home, replace thenbattery, and bring back the old one. I was tempted to say give me my money back and drive down the street to Obriens or Advanced Auto Parts
 

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Man. $400 to replace a battery? That price is about 3x too high.

Although, I do recall my Volt salesman correcting me at least twice, during negotiations, when I referred to the 12v batt as a "lead acid" battery. He'd immediately interject, "Silver acid." I've never heard of a silver acid battery. Is it possible the Volt battery is not a traditional lead acid AGM battery? And, that the battery installed at the factory is a "silver acid" type? If so, maybe that explains why the thing would cost $400??
 

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I never thought about this, but in one sense, cold cranking amps probably doesn't matter in the volt's case as there is no traditional starter using that battery. In he past, I used to buy the biggest CCA that would fit in that spot, but who knows whether that would help or hurt in this case.
CCA is maximized by maximizing plate surface area. Resistance to excessive discharge, which can kill a battery or reduce its life, is maximized by the thickness of the plates. For that reason, batteries purchased for the Volt should be the heaviest deep discharge batteries that will fit in the available space.

Importantly, 12v batteries used in the Volt must be AGM valve regulated sealed lead acid batteries. Not only because of their location but because the charge and discharge voltages for AGM batteries are different from those of the flooded cell batteries used in most ICE cars. A charger optimized for an AGM battery will not provide optimal conditions for a flooded cell battery.

KNS

ps - My dealer put a new OEM EVLN2 in my 2012 for less than $150. The part number of the 12v battery in my 2015 is not the same. I don't know the significance of that change or when it occurred.
 

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It seems that Deka has a battery - 9AGM47 - that is an exact replacement for around $140 at http://www.batteriesasap.com/9agm47.html Figuring shipping to my home and state and local taxes brings that price up to $200. According to Dan Petit, Deka is the only brand to buy.

Replacing a battery involves following safety precautions. Never short the positive terminal to the negative terminal, or to a metal part of the car while the negative cable is connected to its terminal. Remove all rings and wrist watch.

I would unbolt and remove the negative cable and bag the exposed metal end in a heavy plastic bag, then wrap that with a towel. Then I would unbolt the positive cable and position it out of the way.
Lastly, I would unbolt and remove the retaining strap, detach the vent tube (I'm assuming there is one) and lift out the battery carefully.

Putting in the new battery would involve reversing the above steps.

Dispose of the old battery properly.
 

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It seems that Deka has a battery - 9AGM47 - that is an exact replacement for around $140 at http://www.batteriesasap.com/9agm47.html Figuring shipping to my home and state and local taxes brings that price up to $200. According to Dan Petit, Deka is the only brand to buy.

Replacing a battery involves following safety precautions. Never short the positive terminal to the negative terminal, or to a metal part of the car while the negative cable is connected to its terminal. Remove all rings and wrist watch.

I would unbolt and remove the negative cable and bag the exposed metal end in a heavy plastic bag, then wrap that with a towel. Then I would unbolt the positive cable and position it out of the way.
Lastly, I would unbolt and remove the retaining strap, detach the vent tube (I'm assuming there is one) and lift out the battery carefully.

Putting in the new battery would involve reversing the above steps.

Dispose of the old battery properly.
East Penn Manufacturing has a good rep...:)
 

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...Replacing a battery involves following safety precautions. Never short the positive terminal to the negative terminal, or to a metal part of the car while the negative cable is connected to its terminal. Remove all rings and wrist watch.

I would unbolt and remove the negative cable and bag the exposed metal end in a heavy plastic bag, then wrap that with a towel. Then I would unbolt the positive cable and position it out of the way.
Lastly, I would unbolt and remove the retaining strap, detach the vent tube (I'm assuming there is one) and lift out the battery carefully...
Lots easier and safer to let the dealer do it. Installed cost won't be much higher and could be lower.

KNS
 

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Their is zero incentive for the manufacturer to put in a long term battery of any kind. Just the minimum to get you off the lot and into your garage. Nice point about the cold crank amps - no real need for the Volt, just longevity.
I have no doubt that is typically the case... but man, my 2001 Altima had amazing OEM battery and windshield wipers. I replaced the battery after 7 years, not because it died, but because I was nervous it would die because that is a long time on an OEM battery! But it never gave me any issues. The wipers lasted me 5 years and performed well the entire time. All the replacements I could find only lasted a year or so. I tried to find the OEM replacements but for some reason I couldn't in the aftermarket.
 

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....Although, I do recall my Volt salesman correcting me at least twice, during negotiations,...
Well, if a car salesman says it,,, you can take that to the bank!
Why is everyone else, including the data tag on the battery, saying it's an AGM? It has the warning icons for a Lead Acid battery,,,, but you should trust the words of a car salesman.

Anyway, Date of Manufacture is an important spec. Lead Acid batteries 'self discharge'. If a Volt, or any car, is untouched for a long time the Lead Acid battery is aging in a discharged state.

I'd go for the place that sells the most batteries. The battery the dealership sells you may have sat on the shelf for a year before being sold, with no trickle charging.
 

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Lots easier and safer to let the dealer do it. Installed cost won't be much higher and could be lower.

KNS
Well, that might be you, but the OP stated "Trying to decide what battery to buy. Dealer wants $400 to replace." With proper precaution changing out the Volt battery isn't hard, or unsafe. I would say that his using his dealer would cost him double what it would cost if he were to buy a Deka and do the job himself.
 

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Why is everyone else, including the data tag on the battery, saying it's an AGM? It has the warning icons for a Lead Acid battery,,,, but you should trust the words of a car salesman.

Anyway, Date of Manufacture is an important spec. Lead Acid batteries 'self discharge'. If a Volt, or any car, is untouched for a long time the Lead Acid battery is aging in a discharged state.

I'd go for the place that sells the most batteries. The battery the dealership sells you may have sat on the shelf for a year before being sold, with no trickle charging.
AGM batteries, while lead-acid, have much lower self-discharge rates than those with wet cells. My Odyssey AGM claims to be able to sit for a two years at 77 deg F before needing to be recharged. However, installed in a Volt or most modern cars, it has to keep a bunch of electronic junk alive which will drain it much sooner.

Even though the owner's manual "allows" a wet-cell replacement, I'd never wish to share the passenger compartment with a couple quarts of sulfuric acid. Nor would I wish to breathe the fumes from a boiling battery caused by a charging regulator failure.

From the owners' manual:

"Refer to the replacement number
shown on the original battery label
when a new 12-volt battery is
needed. The vehicle has an
Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) 12-volt
battery. Installation of a standard
12-volt battery will result in reduced
12-volt battery life.
When using a 12-volt battery
charger on the 12-volt AGM battery,
some chargers have an AGM
battery setting on the charger.
If available, use the AGM setting on
the charger, to limit charge voltage
to 14.8 volts."
 

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Thanks for all the great informations. Could GM have used a 12V lithium battery instead and shave 50 or so pounds?
 
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