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2016 Volt Premier, delivered Oct/15
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Discussion Starter #1
Not sure if anyone else has experienced this issue. When doing a controlled deceleration using regen paddle, I noticed that the regen "disappears" for a few seconds when hitting some rough payment or small bumps in the road.

This has happened a couple of times to me and luckily I have caught it using the friction brakes. The regen just goes away for a second or two, which is unnerving when approaching another car in front of you ( hitting sunken manhole cover for instance).

Curios to see if anyone else has noticed this.
 

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Yes. Unfortunately this is normal.

This occurs when the wheel speed sensors detect wheel slip, which is used to determine when to activate anti-lock braking (ABS). ABS can't work effectively when regen is active, so it just gets completely deactivated.

It is certainly unnerving, especially when you're not used to it. And I can also see how it would be especially problematic on the Gen 2 when you might be using the regen paddles and not even have your foot in the brake pedal.
 

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It is worse running over-inflated tires as well.

If you are slowing down your foot should be ready for the brake. The same thing happens in L mode on Gen 1. The Volt's suspension gets unsettled on sharp bumps. Could be better.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the info guys
 

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And the stronger the regen, the more "exciting" it is when it ceases to regen. Had a BMW i3 for an extended 3 day test drive once. That car has really strong regen, but man when it did this (I think exacerbated by the skinny tires)...yikes!
 

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And the stronger the regen, the more "exciting" it is when it ceases to regen. Had a BMW i3 for an extended 3 day test drive once. That car has really strong regen, but man when it did this (I think exacerbated by the skinny tires)...yikes!
The i3 should be about the same regen at max lift throttle as Volt 2 with regen paddles, so I imagine that they would feel similar. The i3 has rear independent suspension that should be much less prone to do this than the non-independent torsion beam on the rear of the Volt.
 

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The i3 should be about the same regen at max lift throttle as Volt 2 with regen paddles, so I imagine that they would feel similar. The i3 has rear independent suspension that should be much less prone to do this than the non-independent torsion beam on the rear of the Volt.
The Volt does regen with front tires only. The BMW does regen with the rear tires only.
 

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One more thing to note, as your OEM tires wear, it will get worse. I changed to a brand new set of Yokohamas and not worrying about max range has made a world of difference for my g1 volt. I rarely get any loss of traction with a great set of performance tires.
 

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FWIW, the old Honda Insight does the same thing. The rear on that car is so light that it has been an almost daily occurrence on the less than ideal brick streets in downtown Orlando.

It's a common part of regenerative braking.

Of course, your foot is already lightly pressing the brake on the Insight when this happens. The regen paddle on the Volt steering wheel is much more aggressive than what I've grown accustomed to during all these years in the Insight. On the Insight, in order to avoid the friction brakes, you really only get about half of max regen and the comparatively small generator doesn't create that much drag anyway. Suddenly losing full regen on the Volt would be alarming by comparison.
 
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