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Unfortunately, the article states:

"while it's adequate for laptops and cellphones, the battery will need to discharge at least three times faster to work in a car"

I'm thinking that due to nanotechnology breakthroughs, we will see considerable battery improvements within the next 5 years. The holy grail of course is Yi's 10X silicon nanowire battery. That's of course if Saudi Arabia doesn't buy it first (already gave him a grant worth 10 million dollars - he has to spend 3 weeks to 3 months a year in Saudi Arabia doing research - I couldn't make that up).
 

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Unfortunately, the article states:

"while it's adequate for laptops and cellphones, the battery will need to discharge at least three times faster to work in a car"

I'm thinking that due to nanotechnology breakthroughs, we will see considerable battery improvements within the next 5 years. The holy grail of course is Yi's 10X silicon nanowire battery. That's of course if Saudi Arabia doesn't buy it first (already gave him a grant worth 10 million dollars - he has to spend 3 weeks to 3 months a year in Saudi Arabia doing research - I couldn't make that up).
LOL - not satisfied with spreading that tripe in one thread, you have to perpetuate it in another.

The other part of the equation that you are missing is even with Yi's technology, until electric utilities build quick charge / high-energy charging stations, Yi's batteries would only receive a trickle charge from standard 110 / 220 outlets. They may discharge more rapidly, for better vehicle performance, but the Achilles heel of 3 - 4 hour recharge time won't change.
 

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Yeah, I have a bad habit of doing what people tell me not to do. It's a free country with free speech the last time I checked. Funny, I think most of what you write is tripe! One man's...

There you go thinking in your small box again. If they get a 10X battery with quick charge capability and low cost (which Yi stated) then all you do is keep one battery in your garage (or one battery equivalent for every car that requires charging at a station - not a hard calculation). Then you simply pull into your garage and use your induction plug (to the front of the car or more likely under the car) and the charge is transferred as fast as they can make it safe. You see, with cheap battery technology many previous limitations break down. Surely you can now see how easy it is. A 10X battery that Yi described would not only eliminate all cars but even trucks, buses, and even planes could be converted. We are talking 10X! That means the Tesla could almost drive across the country on a battery the same size as is currently installed. If you can't see how important a breakthrough that would be you will just have to wait until someone shows you.
 

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There you go thinking in your small box again. If they get a 10X battery with quick charge capability and low cost (which Yi stated) then all you do is keep one battery in your garage (or one battery equivalent for every car that requires charging at a station - not a hard calculation). Then you simply pull into your garage and use your induction plug (to the front of the car or more likely under the car) and the charge is transferred as fast as they can make it safe.
It will only take the one time that you don't have a spare battery available to make you realize that a 10X rapid recharge battery is still "range limited" without a rapid recharge infrastructure. If your starting and ending point is always your garage (for you it probably is), then it may seldom be a problem, but if you have to drive any distance that doesn't terminate with a home charger - you are stuck.

You see, with cheap battery technology many previous limitations break down.
Who said it was cheap? "Growing" nano-filiments of silicon is anything but cheap, compared to injecting slurries of chemicals into paper cylinders. There you go wishing that your solution is best, based on your biases, instead of examining all the factors that determine feasibility.

Surely you can now see how easy it is. A 10X battery that Yi described would not only eliminate all cars but even trucks, buses, and even planes could be converted. We are talking 10X! That means the Tesla could almost drive across the country on a battery the same size as is currently installed. If you can't see how important a breakthrough that would be you will just have to wait until someone shows you.
LOL - given that your assumptions are rendered invalid, the rest of your paragraph is great comedy. ICE will slowly phase out or remain as backup, and be replaced by batteries, supercapictors and/or fuel cells. I doubt jet airplanes will load up with batteries. More likely, airlines will use hydrogen jets engines or fuel cell props. Perhaps if some of these small scale fusion devices can be weight / size reduced enough, we might have fusion driven props or plasma jets.
 

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Once again Jason you don’t know what you are talking about. Maybe the other readers might put some weight to what this researcher has to say. Of course you probably know more than him about nanotechnology but how about we let the readers decide for themselves. Here is what he said:

From: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2007/12/071219103105.htm

"It's not a small improvement," Cui said. "It's a revolutionary development."
The breakthrough is described in a paper, "High-performance lithium battery anodes using silicon nanowires," published online Dec. 16 in Nature Nanotechnology, written by Cui, his graduate chemistry student Candace Chan and five others. The greatly expanded storage capacity could make Li-ion batteries attractive to electric car manufacturers. Cui suggested that they could also be used in homes or offices to store electricity generated by rooftop solar panels.
"Given the mature infrastructure behind silicon, this new technology can be pushed to real life quickly," Cui said.
He is considering formation of a company or an agreement with a battery manufacturer. Manufacturing the nanowire batteries would require "one or two different steps, but the process can certainly be scaled up," he added. "It's a well understood process."

From what he was quoted as saying I’m guessing that many of the readers would agree with me that the process is not as difficult or expensive as you are suggesting. He says it would be suitable for the home to store energy from solar panels. Doesn’t sound like he thinks it's military-expensive to me. So now that my assumptions have been validated (of course you would never think so, even if Yi called you up and reiterated what he said, but that’s kind of your charm, Jason) Can you begin to see how this technology might be important, should it come to fruition? Again, Yi and his co-researchers are not talking all theory here. They had a physical cell in testing several months ago! Who knows where they are right now.

Anyway, I think we have gone back-and-forth enough on this thread. How about I give you the let’s agree to disagree again before the focus blurs even further.
 

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While the tread starter introduced a new battery technology that might not be applicable for cars here is some news about a Japanese company that says they can improve lithium-ion storage capacity by 30-50% and is planned to be used for hybrid cars. Here is the article:

"Tokyo, Apr 10, 2008 (Jiji Press) - Mitsui Mining & Smelting Co. <5706> said Thursday it has developed a new negative electrode that helps boost the performance of lithium-ion batteries.

The new electrode, made of silicon and copper, boosts lithium-ion batteries' electricity storage capacity by 30 to 50 pct compared with conventional carbon-based negative electrodes, the company said.

The company will launch the new negative electrode, dubbed Silx, by fiscal 2010, with the hope of achieving annual sales of around 10 billion yen in a few years.

Mitsui Mining & Smelting expects the electrode to be used for batteries for hybrid vehicles, personal computers and mobile phone handsets.
"

http://www.japancorp.net/Article.Asp?Art_ID=17657


Stop the presses! I just re-read this and it says they are using silicon and copper. SILICON? I thought that material could not be used because when it swells too much it breaks down. Of course Yi Cui came up with the brilliant idea to store the lithium in silicon nanowires and thus solved the problem. Is Mitsui also using silicon nanowires? Where is a nanotechnology and battery guru around when you need one?
 
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