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I just got a flyer in the mail offering a $20 discount on a map update, so it was "only" $140.

Chevy is missing a huge opportunity here. The reality is that times have changed - real-time maps are on every smart phone these days. Instead of insulting people with a $100+ charge to get map updates, they should either 1) make it free, and make it an opportunity to bring customers in, show them that they're appreciated (and even cross-sell them - though I'd suggest against it), or 2) charge $20. (As an aside, they really just need to introduce functionality to auto-update maps automatically using your home's wifi).

I think #1 is the best option, but even #2 I would understand. And I bet they'd make more money charging $20, too, because so many people that would pay $20 would never pay $100+.
 

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I just got a flyer in the mail offering a $20 discount on a map update, so it was "only" $140.

Chevy is missing a huge opportunity here. The reality is that times have changed - real-time maps are on every smart phone these days. Instead of insulting people with a $100+ charge to get map updates, they should either 1) make it free, and make it an opportunity to bring customers in, show them that they're appreciated (and even cross-sell them - though I'd suggest against it), or 2) charge $20. (As an aside, they really just need to introduce functionality to auto-update maps automatically using your home's wifi).

I think #1 is the best option, but even #2 I would understand. And I bet they'd make more money charging $20, too, because so many people that would pay $20 would never pay $100+.
I sort of assumed that the cars with built-in nav had automatic map updates these days. I've always used Google Maps as I know I'll have my phone with me anytime I'm in my car and it gives me voice control capabilities too...that sucks that they charge that much.

My dad's Lincoln MKZ hybrid's nav system can only receive map updates via a series of CDs that you put into the sound system, and the car has to be running for about 6 hours while this happens. I can't imagine doing that in a non-hybrid...you'd burn through half a tank of gas updating the map...
 

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Just use Android Auto or Apple Carplay. I'll never use the built in substandard maps ever again.
Yes, they are substandard, I completely agree. The only time it is REALLY useful is when you simply have gotten lost (for whatever reason) and you don't have any cell reception. That is the real advantage. Having said that, with Android Auto and MyLink, google maps are EXCELLENT!
 

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Yep, I plan on leaving the current map data forever. If Chevy did do a massive change and offer an update for $20, I'd do it once a year. As it is now I'll use the car GPS for a general "awareness" thing and use a Garmin or cell phone nav for real navigation.
 

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I just got a flyer in the mail offering a $20 discount on a map update, so it was "only" $140.

Chevy is missing a huge opportunity here. The reality is that times have changed - real-time maps are on every smart phone these days. Instead of insulting people with a $100+ charge to get map updates, they should either 1) make it free, and make it an opportunity to bring customers in, show them that they're appreciated (and even cross-sell them - though I'd suggest against it), or 2) charge $20. (As an aside, they really just need to introduce functionality to auto-update maps automatically using your home's wifi).

I think #1 is the best option, but even #2 I would understand. And I bet they'd make more money charging $20, too, because so many people that would pay $20 would never pay $100+.
The problem is most likely that the map data owner (Navteq and Teleatlas) wants their cut for an update. So my guess is you are paying a markup twice, once from Chevy to Navteq (or whomever they use for their data) and another for you to Chevy.

I think GM has already worked around this issue by supporting Android and Apple so you can use those companies map data, that have constant no charge updates.

I agree though, it is far past the time that those upgrades should cost more than $20.
 

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The model is changing. The Bolt EV uses CarPlay and Android Auto exclusively for navigation, for example.
 

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I received the same letter and had to laugh. They will not be getting my money for the update. I stopped using the built-in NAV and use a Garmin the has HD traffic and lifetime upgrades. The Garmin is much better anyway. No need to buy built-in GPS systems anymore. The map update costs are a ripoff.
 

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That's actually less than I thought it would be (which is sad in itself)

The only time it is REALLY useful is when you simply have gotten lost (for whatever reason) and you don't have any cell reception. That is the real advantage. Having said that, with Android Auto and MyLink, google maps are EXCELLENT!
Google maps can cache areas for offline use, so if you plan ahead before leaving service areas, you'll still be able to GPS-locate yourself on the map and find a road to where you need to go.
Not sure if the cache is offline searchable for specific streets, but even just having your current position shown on a map is immensely helpful if you're lost.
 

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I think the trend is to do away with built-in nav altogether and rely on your phone connected to the display. Enter the Bolt EV...
 

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Even with 2014 map data, my ELR gets me where I'm going with very little error. Even with the massive DFW road/highway construction.

Yep, they sent me a letter saying it's $160 to update the map data. I can do without.
 

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Even if you buy updates as often as possible, your maps won't be really up to date most of the time. The way I see it, the GPS option cost and updates are just a way for a car company to take a bunch of money from people who have very low price sensitivity. That is a good business strategy, but not one that I want to contribute to.

Besides cost and current maps, another big advantage of using a smartphone for nav is that you can enter your destination before you even get into your car, saving time.
 

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I think #1 is the best option, but even #2 I would understand. And I bet they'd make more money charging $20, too, because so many people that would pay $20 would never pay $100+.
Consider it this way, they already found people to pay 240 a year or twice or onstar, what makes you think they care?
 

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I remember not long ago when Google map navigation is in its infancy, I was like, my Garmin is much better!

Here we are, some years later, when phone app navigation have become the norm and often surpass dedicated navigational devices in terms of accuracy (always up to date map) and feature (much better/granular traffic info, ie Waze). It's also just so much easier to use (enter/lookup info).

I test drove a Bolt recently and was blown by carplay. This is the future!

I'll pay for build-in navigation IF cost is reasonable, and they offer free map update via my home wifi network. Until then, it's my Garmin for road trips, and phone for rest of the day to day drives.
 

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In the "old days" (10 years ago), I used to pay $300 for my BMW map update disc. Yes, times are changing.
 

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I think something that many folks, including gm/chevy is that built in real/semi-real time navigation should be integrated into the vehicle system so that the most electrically efficient routes can be calculated, and to always have nearby charging stations taken into account to advise drivers where they can easily charge up, en route or near the destination.

It could also help avoid the dreaded ERDTT if the vehicle knows your destination is only 10 minutes away, it doesn't need to waste gas trying to warm up the vehicle (unless you tell it to).

Whether this integration comes as part of statically loaded maps, or via on-demand/OTA (like google/waze/etc) can be debated, but either way having integrated navigation could make the whole system more intelligent and efficient.
 

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The Tesla GPS is integral to avoiding "range anixety" and preventing owners from being stranded. Can ANY aftermarket GPS Nav system do what their built- in system does?

This is where I think a built-in system is better.
 
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