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Sorry if this has been asked:

If I'm driving in HOLD mode and have 50% of ev range (for example) when I go down a rather long incline, will the ev range automatically "increase" or do I need to physically be in NORMAL mode to capture those?

Just curious. I'm talking driving on a highway to clarify, not in a city.


Kev
 

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You'll get regen in Hold mode too, don't need to be in normal. Flip over to your energy screen where it shows the "flow". You can watch where energy is being drawn from, and when regen is happening. I don't look at that screen anymore, was more of a novelty for me when I first got my Volt.
 

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Sorry if this has been asked:

If I'm driving in HOLD mode and have 50% of ev range (for example) when I go down a rather long incline, will the ev range automatically "increase" or do I need to physically be in NORMAL mode to capture those?

Just curious. I'm talking driving on a highway to clarify, not in a city.


Kev
If I remember correctly mine charges Battery and turns off ICE until you get back down to your original hold level Then, if you want, you can scroll up to Normal mode and reenter HOLD at your new battery level, or just keep on driving
 

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The car is going to the best it can to hold you at 50% charge. Going down a sufficiently large hill, it will capture the regen and add it to the battery. Once you are back to level or uphill, the car will use any electric available first, then start the generator when needed to keep you at your 50%.
 

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The "flow" screen definitely shows that even when you are in "hold" mode, the battery still gets used from time to time. The Volt system is pretty complex and the system decides when it needs to use battery and when to use gas engine only or a combination.
If you are in "hold" mode and have alot of hills to climb the battery will be used enough that your remaining electric miles will decrease. But the system does try to get back up to where you were at when going into hold mode and you might gain a couple of miles if you go downhill long enough.
 

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Don’t forget that not all "Gas" miles in a Volt are driven while the engine is running. A lot of them are battery-powered miles. "Electric" miles are miles driven using the grid power stored in the battery or on regen battery power put there while driving on grid power. "Gas" miles are miles driven while the motor is fueled by regen battery power put there while driving in Hold or with a fully depleted battery, and miles driven while the engine is running. Shifting to Hold preserves any remaining grid power for later use. If you add regen on top of this remaining grid power, it gets counted as Gas miles when used.

Regenerative braking is an electric car’s alternative to friction braking. Regen slows the car by using up the car’s momentum (kinetic energy) to crank a generator. You can’t really choose not to use regen when slowing down except by shifting into Neutral, but you can adjust the charging level using D, L, the paddle, or the brake pedal. Some find one choice better than another, depending on the traffic situation. That the braking process recharges the battery is a bonus, not the purpose of the system. Any charge put back into the battery can then be used to power the electric motor. When the distance driven on that regen power is counted as Electric Miles, it factors into your ev mileage and total ev trip distances (and subsequent ev range estimates). When counted as Gas Miles, it factors into your MPGcs gas mileage. Those drivers who go to great lengths to maximize the number of regen battery miles counted as "Electric" miles tend to ignore the effect this has on their gas mileage.

Remember, too, that at the bottom of a long hill, your Volt’s "on the fly" range estimates (gas or electric, depending on your driving mode) are using a mileage estimate that thinks you’re going to continue driving downhill, so your estimated range may now be greater than it was at the top of the hill. You didn’t gain miles, you just drove more efficiently while headed downhill. Once you hit level terrain, the estimate will again revise itself.
 

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I don’t worry about these details any more. I just drive.
Agreed, stop looking at your DIC and enjoy the ride.
 

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As has been described many times, the main battery is never fully charged or discharged. When going down a long hill in hold, the gas engine will switch off and the battery can gain more charge by regen than when hold was engaged. When the road levels out again, the Volt will travel in electric mode until the excess charge is used up, then the gas engine will start up again when needed. Also when going up a long incline, the Volt will use some charge and gas at the same time if there is charge to use. When the road levels out, the gas engine will run until the charge deficiency is made up. It's pretty complicated, but the car manages it all automatically. The gen 2 is better at managing propulsion seamlessly than the gen 1 in my opinion.
 

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If you want to "capture" that extra charge, you'll have to switch out of Hold and then put it back in Hold at the bottom of the hill to reset the hold point. It won't increase the hold point automatically; it stays at the point where it was when you first entered Hold mode and it will run the engine whenever necessary to keep it roughly around that point.
 

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In "Mountain Mode," the engine keeps me at half-charge on mountain ascents. When I come down Freemont Pass or Vail Pass from 11,000 to 12,000 feet for several thousand vertical feet, I gain several kilowatt-hours of additional electrical charge. "Hold" is similar. On my 8-mile drive to work, down 500 vertical feet, I normally only consume 1 KwH of charge.
 

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New owner here so please excuse my ignorance. Will I regen if I completely depleted my battery? Is there an optimal SOC to never dip below to account for potential regen? Essentially, when should I switch to Hold mode to build up more electric range?
 

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New owner here so please excuse my ignorance. Will I regen if I completely depleted my battery? Is there an optimal SOC to never dip below to account for potential regen? Essentially, when should I switch to Hold mode to build up more electric range?
Will I regen if I completely depleted my battery? - Yes. Regen always puts energy back into the battery so unless the battery is already fully charged regen will put more energy into the battery.

Is there an optimal SOC to never dip below to account for potential regen? No - Except for the rare situation of starting out at the top of a long down hill run with a full battery. In that case it makes sense to not start the downhill run with more than perhaps 70% battery charge so that you can recover significant energy, several kWH, using regen.

Essentially, when should I switch to Hold mode to build up more electric range? You don't use Hold mode to build up electric range. You use Hold mode to save whatever battery SOC remains in the Volt's battery for later use. You can use Mountain mode to build up, maintain ~ 15-20% SOC prior to starting an ascent so that the electric motor can assist the gas engine when ascending a mountain or mountain pass.
 

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New owner here so please excuse my ignorance. Will I regen if I completely depleted my battery? Is there an optimal SOC to never dip below to account for potential regen? Essentially, when should I switch to Hold mode to build up more electric range?
All your questions assume an answer that is false.

1. The battery never completely depleats. It hits a lower state of charge (SOC) that never allows full depleation. Once the car hits the lower SOC, the generator comes on to keep on truckin'.

2. Regen adds back electrons so has nothing to do with lower SOC. Unless you're at the upper SOC and no more regen can be captured. Even at upper SOC, there is still a buffer that can capture some regen.

3. Hold does not build up more electric range. It "holds" the SOC near the current state by running the generator.
 
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