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Discussion Starter #1
I am interested in buying a new volt. It's for selfish reasons. The town i live in offers free lvl 2 charging near my home at the public lots for anyone. In total it's about 10 ev plugs the town offers. my work offers free lvl 2 charging for employees and guests. both use chargepoint. The town augments the charging with a solar panel array. BUT I have no garage and park in a private lot exposed to the outdoor temperature with no plug. We have hot summers here 90°f summers and -05°f winters. If the Volt was left outside, unplugged with a good charge in the batteries, how would it fair?

I watched a Weber auto video about a gen2 volt battery deep dive. The guy mentioned there is a heater element and a a/c for the battery coolent. Would these two work to keep the battery "happy" while it's unplugged on the hot and cold extremes?

Frank
 

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If the volt's own battery level is above 50% it will heat/cool the battery from its own source, so no worries.
 

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The Volt ownership experience works best if you can plug in at home, preferably in a garage, and do the majority of charging overnight. However many early Volts went to fleet use and were rarely charged, with mostly ICE miles accumulated. If you can charge frequently at work and elsewhere....why not?
 

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Some charging is better than no charging.;)
 

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Those are not ideal conditions for a Volt (or any other car, for that matter). The Volt will not actively maintain battery temperature while parked unplugged, but the battery is well insulated, and if it is used daily, or almost daily, it will be fine and the battery will be within the normal range most of the time. Worst case is it gets too cold and then reverts to gasoline mode until it can warm the battery up. The car is designed to handle that. Again, those conditions are not ideal, but your most likely alternative is an ICE car, and that will need to be cold started at -5f also, which is possible but not ideal for that kind of car either. There is no real reason the Volt wouldn't work for you.

Just understand that in extremely cold temperatures, you will get considerably reduced battery range and the engine will run some at any temperature below 15F, even with a full charge.
 

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Charging at work will solve most of the handwringing you'll see about this. And having access to charging near home will help as well, especially free charging, which will motivate actually doing it.
 

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I wouldn't fret about -5 degrees to 90 degrees. If you lived in Arizona where it is commonly 120 degrees or in Alaska or northern Canada where you can reach -20 degrees, then plugging in during those times would be better. But the car runs fine - I had no charging at work the last 4 years, no issues with battery life at all.
 

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The car will be fine. 90 deg is not too hot; -5 deg will certainly diminish battery performance, but it wont damage it. Just charge it when you can and use the ICE when necessary. And with level 2 charging at work, you wont use the ICE that much.
 

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Do not count on "free" charging; especially if running costs are an important factor in the purchasing decision, as there is no guarantee those will remain free or there will be open spaces when you really need one (getting ICE'd frequently happens).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hello,

Yes , I understand my battery range can be cut significantly, esp in the cold. I've seen many ev owners, hybrid, and plug in owners on you tube talking about it. (They were aware and happy) But it seems to be a agreement that it be ok. Perhaps not the most ideal, but workable. The free network is nice. I just cant park overnight plugged. Since the public garage is open 24/7 365 and it's a free to the public charger. Every 2.5 hours you need to reset the charger, or it will turn off.

The government fleet early Volts. If you work for the government and given a Volt, you are only reimburse for gas, not electricity.and why pay for charging at 2.00 an hour of lvl 2 at Walgreens while gas is free. Yes, a kilowatt is mere cents on The dollar at home. And even a lvl 1 streight in your garage outlet was too much effort, I suppose....Those employees were not the early adaptor type. Unlike now there was no charging. Now many government agencies have charging.

Many care are parked outdoors, perhaps not the most ideal. Many people people don't have a private garage. I suppose can move out of the city, and to the suburbs were most everyone has a private garage. I'm sure the vehicle engineers thought about that, and factored it in.
 

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Depending on the length of your commute, charging at work may be all you need during the week. Note though that some workplaces try to enforce time limits in order to share the charging resources among a lot of EV users. For example at my wifes workplace, they reserve two hour slots throughout the day. The EV drivers have a chat group so that if there are any issues, they can be resolved quickly. Unfortunately in our case, while she can do the entire 30+ mile round trip commute all-electric, the two hour slot is not sufficient to fully recharge the car round-trip. So workplace charging only covers one-way, and we charge again at home. (If only the Volt had a more powerful on-board charger...)
 

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While we are on this topic of hot and cold battery maintenance I would like to know at what cold temperatures will battery warming occur when plugged in? I ask this because we have been getting temps down to 1-3 deg C overnight and I have yet to see any evidence of the EVSE providing any further power to the vehicle after it is fully charged - in other words I see no evidence yet of it using electricity to warm the battery - at least at these temperatures.
 

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While we are on this topic of hot and cold battery maintenance I would like to know at what cold temperatures will battery warming occur when plugged in? I ask this because we have been getting temps down to 1-3 deg C overnight and I have yet to see any evidence of the EVSE providing any further power to the vehicle after it is fully charged - in other words I see no evidence yet of it using electricity to warm the battery - at least at these temperatures.
On the Config screen, you can check off engine assisted heating while plugged in.
 

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While we are on this topic of hot and cold battery maintenance I would like to know at what cold temperatures will battery warming occur when plugged in? I ask this because we have been getting temps down to 1-3 deg C overnight and I have yet to see any evidence of the EVSE providing any further power to the vehicle after it is fully charged - in other words I see no evidence yet of it using electricity to warm the battery - at least at these temperatures.
I believe the manual recommends keeping the car plugged in during weather below 0C, so the TMS probably kicks in near 0C or maybe a little lower. Also note that it takes the insulated pack a very long time to cool to ambient temperature, so you may not notice heating even many hours after temperatures drop below that level.
 

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In my experience with my 2017 Volt the TMS won't let the Volt's battery temperature fall below 40F/4C as long as the Volt is plugged in. I have seen the charging indicator light on my EVSE come on briefly while my Volt was parked and already fully charged. Once the battery temperature reaches the minimum temperature it does not take much power to maintain the battery at this temperature.
 

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I walk a half-mile every night to charge my Volt at a free station. While inconvenient hiking late at night through drifts of snow at sub-zero temperatures, the vehicle has functioned several years without operational issues at any temperature. With more than 8,000 miles of long-distance travel on gasoline with fuel efficiency around 40 MPG, my Volt lifetime fuel economy is about 80 MPG. I sometimes drool at the high-clearance vehicles that friends at work own to negotiate rough mountain roads. However, they envy the fact that I use 100 gallons of gasoline per year, while they use 800 gallons of fuel in their gas-guzzlers. In three years, the efficiency of the Volt has provided me with enough cost savings to remodel my kitchen this year.
 
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