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I've received another email that says I need to take my new Volt to the dealer for:

CHECK ENGINE, ELECTRONICS AND BATTERY PACK COOLANT
CHECK THE SEALANT AND COMPRESSOR KIT EXPIRATION

The first time I brought the car in, the service rep said this was merely a way of "gaming" me into the "system" to generate revenue.

Granted I never expected a dealer to verbalize what I've always thought (for 40 years) but now I am wondering: "Do they have a qualified Volt mechanic?" Maybe not.

Can anyone shed some light on what the above maintenance is? I presume there's a dipstick for battery coolant, the rest I don't know. OnStar reports no issues and there is no recall at the moment.

Thanks!
 

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Take out your owners manual...turn to the maintenance schedule...then check your Volt's mileage...if it is below the last maintenance mileage/time requirements then you are good...those emails are merely fishing by the dealership to separate you from some of your cash...:(
 

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I've received another email that says I need to take my new Volt to the dealer for:

CHECK ENGINE, ELECTRONICS AND BATTERY PACK COOLANT
CHECK THE SEALANT AND COMPRESSOR KIT EXPIRATION

The first time I brought the car in, the service rep said this was merely a way of "gaming" me into the "system" to generate revenue.

Granted I never expected a dealer to verbalize what I've always thought (for 40 years) but now I am wondering: "Do they have a qualified Volt mechanic?" Maybe not.

Can anyone shed some light on what the above maintenance is? I presume there's a dipstick for battery coolant, the rest I don't know. OnStar reports no issues and there is no recall at the moment.

Thanks!
It is a standard letter sent to all Volt owners to generate revenue for the dealer. The Volt has 3 separate coolant reservoirs (engine, high voltage traction battery and high voltage electronics.) You can see the 3 reservoirs if you look under the hood. The coolant is a special GM coolant so you can't just top off the coolant with any brand you find at the auto parts store. Checking and topping off the coolant levels is covered under the standard service visits, you get two within the first two years and two oil changes included when you purchase your new Volt. The Volt has no spare tire, just a tire inflation pump and a canister of sealant goop. The sealant goop has a limited shelf life and should be replaced when it has reached its expiration date. Many chose to purchase a space saver spare tire and jack and ignore the sealant and tire pump.

If you check the Owner's Manual you will see that the Volt requires very little maintenance. Unless you are notified by mail or through the MyChevrolet app that your Volt is part of a recall campaign it is a good idea to bring the Volt to the dealer at least once every 12 months. The dealer will perform a 12 point inspection and apply any needed software updates. The recommended tire rotation interval is every 7500 miles. The Volt keeps track of the remaining engine oil life, the engine oil and filter need to be changed at least once every 2 years. Maintain proper tire inflation and check the condition of the windshield wiper blades and you are done. The Voltec transmission fluid should be replaced at 45k miles.
 

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and there is an EXPIRATION date on the COMPRESSOR SEALANT can.

I would make sure you can turn the selection knob every year or so and leave it in the AIR position.
 

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The postcard or e-mail from the service unit is often triggered by the marketing people based on the anticipation that the vehicle is approaching a mileage point in the maintenance schedule, and is offering to have their service department perform those inspections for you. Since some inspections are supposed to be done each month, all Volts are always approaching time for some inspections.

Many drivers look at the manual’s maintenance schedule and see only the check marks for tire rotations. This leads them to think that Volt maintenance consists only of rotating the tires every 7.5K miles. What they often overlook is the "once a month" checks listed at the start of the maintenance section, and the text in the directive at the left of the checkmark chart that says: "Rotate tires and perform Required Services."

Some may laugh, but indeed, every 7,500 miles, "required" services include an "accelerator pedal check for damage, high effort, or binding," and "check tire sealant expiration date, if equipped."

“By the book” includes monthly fluid level checks (engine, electronics, and battery pack coolant levels; oil levels, windshield washer fluid levels), and a lengthier list of inspections to accompany those tire rotations each 7,500 miles (brakes, steering, suspension, body hinges and latches, cooling, fueling, and exhaust systems... and not to forget the accelerator pedal check and the age of the tire sealant).

The dealer is, of course, hoping you will authorize their service department to perform a "maintenance inspection" that should cover these required services. The maintenance section of your owner’s manual will point you to pages in the manual that provide further explanation for each item requiring inspection.
 

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The first time I brought the car in, the service rep said this was merely a way of "gaming" me into the "system" to generate revenue.

Granted I never expected a dealer to verbalize what I've always thought (for 40 years) but now I am wondering: "Do they have a qualified Volt mechanic?" Maybe not.
I don't understand why his response would trigger your question. The email wasn't sent by any mechanic. I'd be making sure that service writer was permanently assigned to me.
 

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I get those quite frequently. I just ignore them. Everyone should be able to check fluid levels themselves.

http://gm-volt.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/image1.jpg

As for the tire compressor kit and sealant: You can check those if you want. But I wouldn't recommend using them even if you get a flat. Those things are notoriously terrible.
 

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I'd regularly get notices from my friendly Nissan dealer that it was time to bring my Leaf in for its oil change. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I get those quite frequently. I just ignore them. Everyone should be able to check fluid levels themselves.

http://gm-volt.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/image1.jpg

As for the tire compressor kit and sealant: You can check those if you want. But I wouldn't recommend using them even if you get a flat. Those things are notoriously terrible.
Thanks for the pic! I had no idea the notice was referring to the fixaflat can. Guess no -spare-tire is becoming a "new norm." If you have robust, strong ears try asking a tire guy what he thinks when he gets a "fixaflatted" tire. (smile)
 

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I'd regularly get notices from my friendly Nissan dealer that it was time to bring my Leaf in for its oil change. LOL
Early on in its life, I took my 2011 LEAF in to the dealer. The service rep said besides the multipoint inspection, I should have the oil changed. Giving him the benefit of the doubt, I politely said no thanks, and BTW the LeAF does not need an oil change like an ICE car. The service staff at the dealers need o have more education.
 

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Hard to break old habits. Dealers have been doing oil changes for 100 years. Cars that dob't have a gas engine are very much outside their normal service day, thoughts.
 
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