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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I am 99% certain I'm right (so if I'm wrong let me know), but I figured I may as well post because this may help someone else. As follows:

OK so I got the electrician to install my single phase 240 volt 30 amp NEMA L6-30R twist-lock outlet in my garage today. It looks great. Unfortunately, at the time he came, I didn't have my Clipper Creek LCS-25 unit at the house for him to put the corresponding L6-30P (plug) onto the wiring of the LCS-25.

It looks SUPER easy to put the plug onto the wire... but I'd like confirmation that what I'm doing is correct... I won't hold you liable it if I fry the unit... just looking for friendly knowledge. So if anybody with a bit of electrical knowledge wants to chime in, I'd appreciate it.

See pic, which on the Left side shows the base of the dissembled L6-30P slid onto the Clipper Creek LCS-25 conduit, (with a sealing rubber gasket by the way), and on the Right side of the pic you can see the white connecting portion of the L6-30P with the prongs/screws labeled X & Y showing.

So, looking at the three wires (Black, Red, & Green) coming from the LCS-25. I think Green should go into the G screw (for Ground) on the L6-30p. (not shown in pic; it's the bigger prong in the background of the pic, though a screw is partly obscuring it in the pic.)

Then there are the other two identical prongs X & Y on the L6-30P, which you can see in the pic. Looking at the wiring diagram, it appears that L1 & L2 are the black and red (or red and black) & are probably what will go to the X & Y screws/prongs on the L6-30p. And looking at the wiring diagram, it appears that the two prongs receive identical 120V 'hot' input, so probably either way I put them is ok (L1 to X or Y, L2 to X or Y)

Link http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_does_red_wire_black_wire_and_green_wire_denote#page2

20130920_232327.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You got it right. The red & black from the LCS-25 go to the X & Y (no polarity) and green (ground) goes to G.
Thank you! Looking forward to some 240V charging!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not a huge deal but the LCS-25 requires a 25A breaker.
Can someone confirm: It would ONLY have been an issue IF i had installed LESS THAN a 25 amp breaker (e.g. a 20 amp breaker). Installing a higher-amperage 30 amp breaker is harmless. It's LIKE running a small 500 watt appliance off a 20 amp outlet: the appliance will simply continue to draw its limited current; the max is not relevant.

For me, the advantage is that I'm putting a 30 amp circuit into the garage, which will support a faster charger than even the LCS-25.
 

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Oh no, lets not start this debate again. Logical Thinker you are correct, your 30 amp circuit breaker is fine for the reasons you state ... assuming your electrician followed code (which I am sure he did) and used 10 gage wire in the wall.
 

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1. Volt only draws 16 amps.
2. Breakers protect the house not the device.
3. Believe your electrician not the Internet.
 

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For me, the advantage is that I'm putting a 30 amp circuit into the garage, which will support a faster charger than even the LCS-25.
Everyone is more or less right here. Technically and in a perfect world a device on a dedicated circuit would have a breaker that matched the device. So telveer was right. However, he also said it wasn't a big deal and he was right on that as well. The difference between a 25A and 30A breaker isn't anything to worry about.

You're also right about how you've set up your system to support high charging. FWIW changing breakers is simple. As Loboc is saying, it's the wire that matters. So long as you have run the correct gauge wire, moving from one charging level to another would, at most, simply involve changing breakers at the panel. That's a five minute job. Changing the wire is an entirely different and more expensive task.
 

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While on the subject of lcs-25 chargers, I notice that Clipper Creek is selling the EVSE with plugs already attached for an extra 50 bucks. I also see that they have it with 4 pronged plug or a 3 pronged plug. What might they doing with the 4th prong since the EVSE only requires 3? It is important to me as I have already pulled nmb-3 with a separate ground through the basement and am trying to decide what receptacle to put on the end and what to with the fourth wire, cap it or connect it? Any thoughts?
 

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Uh, no. 3-phase discussion is totally irrelevant.

The 4th connector is for a common, which none of the 240V J1772 EVSE's require. If you have an existing 4 conductor outlet, you would want a plug that fit it, but you would not use the 4th pin.
 

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Uh, no. 3-phase discussion is totally irrelevant.

The 4th connector is for a common, which none of the 240V J1772 EVSE's require. If you have an existing 4 conductor outlet, you would want a plug that fit it, but you would not use the 4th pin.
Thanks, that is what I figured. That I could go ahead and wire the socket with the common which would allow me to use it for a welder, but the EVSE would come with the common not attached.
 

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The 30 in L6-30 means it is a 30 amp circuit. You are safe. Enjoy!

Can someone confirm: It would ONLY have been an issue IF i had installed LESS THAN a 25 amp breaker (e.g. a 20 amp breaker). Installing a higher-amperage 30 amp breaker is harmless. It's LIKE running a small 500 watt appliance off a 20 amp outlet: the appliance will simply continue to draw its limited current; the max is not relevant.

For me, the advantage is that I'm putting a 30 amp circuit into the garage, which will support a faster charger than even the LCS-25.
 
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