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I can assume that all the public charging stations that are to go up in the next few years will have signs saying this spot is for electric vehicles only. Even if the sign isn't there it would be a pretty dick move for someone to park their conventional gas burning car in front of a charging station. I'd be pretty pissed if I pulled up in my Volt and couldn't charge because a regular car is parked in the EV spot.

But let's turn this around . . .

What if a Leaf or other pure EV car drive pulls up to a public charging station and a Volt is plugged in. I can imagine that the Leaf driver could be desperate for power when the Volt could do without. I guess I won't worry about it too much unless I pull up to an EV charging parking spot at the same time as a Leaf at which time I'll let the Leaf plug in and I'll go park anywhere else.
 

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And what if it takes, say, 4 hours for a full charge, and someone leaves their car there all day...?? Also bad form!
 

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That's why cars get keyed. :)


Even if the sign isn't there it would be a pretty dick move for someone to park their conventional gas burning car in front of a charging station. I'd be pretty pissed if I pulled up in my Volt and couldn't charge because a regular car is parked in the EV spot.

But let's turn this around . . .

What if a Leaf or other pure EV car drive pulls up to a public charging station and a Volt is plugged in. I can imagine that the Leaf driver could be desperate for power when the Volt could do without. I guess I won't worry about it too much unless I pull up to an EV charging parking spot at the same time as a Leaf at which time I'll let the Leaf plug in and I'll go park anywhere else.
 

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Future EV's may not only have sensors, but digitally recorded surveillance systems. Or will it be OnStar taking satellite photos?
 

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Practically-speaking, I think this will depend on the local enforcement. I could see some progressive-leaning locales being very aggressive about enforcing this (Santa Monica, Berkeley, San Francisco, Boston, etc.) but a lot of places that don't have as aggressive parking enforcement, or charging stations that are located on private property, it's kind of first-come, first serve. All the more reason to choose a Volt over a pure BEV right now, until the charging infrastructure gets built out enough where there are plenty of chargers for everyone who wants/needs one.
 

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Practically-speaking, I think this will depend on the local enforcement. I could see some progressive-leaning locales being very aggressive about enforcing this (Santa Monica, Berkeley, San Francisco, Boston, etc.) but a lot of places that don't have as aggressive parking enforcement, or charging stations that are located on private property, it's kind of first-come, first serve. All the more reason to choose a Volt over a pure BEV right now, until the charging infrastructure gets built out enough where there are plenty of chargers for everyone who wants/needs one.
I think that's the problem with BEV's. There will never be enough chargers since unlike a gas station where you pull up, fill up and leave (few pumps needed). A charge station almost assumes you're going to do something else while it charges. At a place like Best Buy that's fine because you'll only be in there maybe 30 minutes. But what about a restaurant or a hotel where you could be there for hours. How many charge stations would you need as BEV, PHEV, EREV's get more popular. Maybe valets will get a lot more popular as well :)
 

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I think that's the problem with BEV's. There will never be enough chargers since unlike a gas station where you pull up, fill up and leave (few pumps needed). A charge station almost assumes you're going to do something else while it charges. At a place like Best Buy that's fine because you'll only be in there maybe 30 minutes. But what about a restaurant or a hotel where you could be there for hours. How many charge stations would you need as BEV, PHEV, EREV's get more popular. Maybe valets will get a lot more popular as well :)
There are such things called quick chargers (dc-dc) that can charge a bev in as little as 20 minutes. Once you get a couple of those then the pervebial scramble for the level 1 and 2 chargers won't be high. Also the assumption that every bev will need the full time to charge up is a bit far fetched. These people will have charge at home, I highly doubt that someone is going to drive 50 miles to a bestbuy (except for the rural people and bevs wouldn't fit their life style)

as for ettiqute of taking a long time charging, it's simply first come first serve. If it's free then being considerate of the person afte you would be a nice thing. But in the event of a driver paying to charge, then that person has no socail or moral obligation to move/disrupt his or her charging time for someone else. The person waiting can simply turn off their bev and wait the same as someone that is driving an ice with very little gas left has to wait at a full gas station
 

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There are such things called quick chargers (dc-dc) that can charge a bev in as little as 20 minutes. Once you get a couple of those then the pervebial scramble for the level 1 and 2 chargers won't be high. Also the assumption that every bev will need the full time to charge up is a bit far fetched. These people will have charge at home, I highly doubt that someone is going to drive 50 miles to a bestbuy (except for the rural people and bevs wouldn't fit their life style)

as for ettiqute of taking a long time charging, it's simply first come first serve. If it's free then being considerate of the person afte you would be a nice thing. But in the event of a driver paying to charge, then that person has no socail or moral obligation to move/disrupt his or her charging time for someone else. The person waiting can simply turn off their bev and wait the same as someone that is driving an ice with very little gas left has to wait at a full gas station
I agree there are level 3 chargers that currently don't exist in the US (at least as a standard). My point being the Leaf shows nearby charge stations. You arrive at a nearby station and there are 2 people waiting for a 30 minute charge (assuming it's a level 3). Remember there is a belief with electric vehicles (BEV) that charge stations at some point will be widespread enough that the notion I need to be tied to some radius from my house will be gone.
 

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I agree there are level 3 chargers that currently don't exist in the US (at least as a standard). My point being the Leaf shows nearby charge stations. You arrive at a nearby station and there are 2 people waiting for a 30 minute charge (assuming it's a level 3). Remember there is a belief with electric vehicles (BEV) that charge stations at some point will be widespread enough that the notion I need to be tied to some radius from my house will be gone.
well over time the price for level 1 and 2 chargers is going to fall rapidly. So those can be installed in parking lots in great numbers. Most of the infrastucture is there in parking garages. I think quick chargers will take most of the brunt of anyone needing a full charge away from home while level 1&2 will be for topping off.
 

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14 years ago....

The existing protocol for many of the chargers around Northern California during the GM EV1 days was to simply leave a card on the dash with your mobile phone number. Several times I got called when my car was charging at a high traffic location and another needed the charger; I would happily return to the car to make space for them. Of course in those days, there were not many cars so you tended to get excited to make contact with another EV driver. It will be interesting to see how this evolves with the Volt and the other EVs.
 

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The existing protocol for many of the chargers around Northern California during the GM EV1 days was to simply leave a card on the dash with your mobile phone number. Several times I got called when my car was charging at a high traffic location and another needed the charger; I would happily return to the car to make space for them. Of course in those days, there were not many cars so you tended to get excited to make contact with another EV driver. It will be interesting to see how this evolves with the Volt and the other EVs.
Here are the websites that were used in those early days.

http://www.evchargernews.com/evchargingprotocolov.htm

http://www.evchargernews.com/chargeprotocolcard.pdf

Unless there is a way for the Volt charge handle alarm to be turned off, the charge protocol card won't work. Calling the owner is the only solution!
 

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I think that's the problem with BEV's. There will never be enough chargers since unlike a gas station where you pull up, fill up and leave (few pumps needed). A charge station almost assumes you're going to do something else while it charges. At a place like Best Buy that's fine because you'll only be in there maybe 30 minutes. But what about a restaurant or a hotel where you could be there for hours. How many charge stations would you need as BEV, PHEV, EREV's get more popular. Maybe valets will get a lot more popular as well :)
I believe the problem is with ICE's. Since BEV's are a new way of driving, a new set of perceptions on the road will be encountered by anyone opting for electric driving. For example, electric car drivers will start each day with their full electric range. If 70% of daily driving continues to be under 40 miles a vast number of gas station stops will be eliminated. Conclusion: BEV's, PHEV's, EREV's are not the problem. The perception that the same ICE habits and needs will be followed by electric car drivers is the problem. I agree that electric cars will be charged more often than ICE's are fueled (especially if many of the cars have Voltec drive trains). Even though Li Ion batteries will be charged more often than gas tanks will be filled, the charging will occur at home each night. With much it occurring during the time periods with the lowest electricity loads.

Put, simply having a full "electric tank" each morning will require fewer fill-ups-on-the-road for daily driving than current ICE's.
 

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Here are the websites that were used in those early days.

http://www.evchargernews.com/evchargingprotocolov.htm

http://www.evchargernews.com/chargeprotocolcard.pdf

Unless there is a way for the Volt charge handle alarm to be turned off, the charge protocol card won't work. Calling the owner is the only solution!
I suggest a new card with verbiage along the lines of:

Please do not disconnect the charge cord from this vehicle as it will trigger both an audible and silent theft alarm.
Should you need immediate use of this charging station, please call me at [CELL PHONE NUMBER] and I will be happy to move my vehicle. Thank you for your consideration.


The reason I would offer to relinquish the charging spot is because an EV without extended range is more likely to require the charging station urgently. I wouldn't expect other Volt owners to take advantage unless they were very low on both battery and gas.
 

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I will alter mine to read somewhere along the lines of "call me, the charger is locked in, but I can unlock it via onstar." because, our chargers will lock into the car with the doors right? So unless you want to go down there you can leave your number and unlock the car remotely. :) Totally cool. I hope people keep courteous and respectful/helpful throughout this. Every time something goes mainstream people tend to get jaded, don't care, and rudeness tends to creep in with the masses.
 

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I will alter mine to read somewhere along the lines of "call me, the charger is locked in, but I can unlock it via onstar." because, our chargers will lock into the car with the doors right?
The charge cord doesn't physically lock into the car. It can be removed at any time.

However, if the car doors are locked, removing the charge cord will trigger a horn and lights alarm. You can also program OnStar to send you an email or text whenever charging is interrupted, complete, or both.

So you could unlock the doors which would allow someone to remove the charge cord without sounding the alarm, but it would also allow someone to steal items from the car. I would much rather meet the person and unplug the cord myself.

I suspect that most public charging stations would also requre that you move the car to allow another to charge. The charge cord is unlikely to reach more than one parking space.
 

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Heck I see cars parked in Handicap spots with no Handicap tags and cars parked in non-parking spaces all the time. Really think that people will suddenly be more courteous with the introduction of EV parking and charging. Another charging infrastructure issue revealed!
 

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I suggest a new card with verbiage along the lines of:

Please do not disconnect the charge cord from this vehicle as it will trigger both an audible and silent theft alarm.
Should you need immediate use of this charging station, please call me at [CELL PHONE NUMBER] and I will be happy to move my vehicle. Thank you for your consideration.


.

Some people will take that as a challenge or opportunity to mess with it.
 

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I suspect that most public charging stations would also requre that you move the car to allow another to charge. The charge cord is unlikely to reach more than one parking space.
Hmm... I don't know about your area, but all the local charging stations here in the Portland, Oregon area are installed "between" two parking spots so that a J1772 plug and 120 volt outlet (sometimes two 120 volt outlets if we're lucky) can be shared by both spots. It's a bummer that if I walk up to a Volt that is fully charged that I won't be able to unplug their cable and plug it into my Leaf without setting off the alarm... I foresee a lot of Volt alarms getting triggered! :)
 
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