GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can someone explain the "rules" for using the "L" position on a 2013 Volt? It appears that it cannot be used for regen over 40 mph. When can "L" be selected without harming the transmission? Is it more efficient to use "L" than "D" in normal city driving if you can tolerate the stronger regen when letting off the accelerator? Thanks - Nels
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
568 Posts
It's not really a rule or anything... these days, if the car will let you do it, it's perfectly okay to do.

I can only comment for gen2 - but it's really just personal preference on how much you want to use the brake/regen paddle. Efficiency wise -- it's always better to coast than to accelerate/brake/repeat.

For me -- I played with driving in "L" all the time, and also with the regen paddle, and it was different, but after the new wears off, I just stick it in "D" and drive like a normal every day car, and that's the way I get the smootest/easiest/most efficent experience.

It's all personal preference on how you want the car to behave when you are off the gas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
433 Posts
I drive in L all the time. I like one pedal driving. It won't hurt your car in the slightest and if anything you'll actually preserve your brake pads for a longer period by driving in L more often.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,130 Posts
Can someone explain the "rules" for using the "L" position on a 2013 Volt? It appears that it cannot be used for regen over 40 mph. When can "L" be selected without harming the transmission? Is it more efficient to use "L" than "D" in normal city driving if you can tolerate the stronger regen when letting off the accelerator? Thanks - Nels
No rules really, that won't prevent some from stating the contrary. It's another selection you have as a driver to customize your driving experience to your taste.

No conventional transmission in the Volt, it's unlike other vehicles on the road. I drive in L and Sport 24/7/365 personally. I prefer the feel and having the car slow itself more as I lift off the accelerator pedal rather than using the brakes as frequently. It's akin to driving a car with a tall gear or a using a manual transmission downshifting to slow down.

I find L to be more efficient in city/stop and go driving.

Good Luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
I drive in L 100% of the time even on the highway at 85mph. I attempted to drive in D yesterday and it just felt weird to me, I didn't like it.

Also, it will regen in L when you are above 40
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,106 Posts
+1 for using L. I especially like it when coming down a longer grade while on the freeway. Keep my cruise set and shift into L and I get to maintain speed and recoup a fair bit of energy, in some cases as much as half a battery.

Not quite sure where you got the 40 mph figure, but L can be used at any speed as it only changes the regeneration tables to be more aggressive than D.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,156 Posts
No rules really. Unsure why you don't think L can't be used for regen at speeds above 40 MPH. It's actually more effective as you slow from higher speeds because, well, there is more energy. So going from 60 MPH to 40 MPH will add more energy than slowing from 40 MPH to 20 MPH. You should see this as you take the off ramp from the freeway.

I normally drive in L but switch to N on the freeway but it doesn't matter a great deal. That's just because coasting is more efficient than regen. It likely also doesn't matter as a practical matter.

You can switch to L or out of it at any time without damaging anything. There isn't anything mechanical. It's just an algorithm. Not the same as changing gears, which is something completely different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Can someone explain the "rules" for using the "L" position on a 2013 Volt? It appears that it cannot be used for regen over 40 mph.
No Rules. It will regen at speeds over 40 mph. Not sure where you got that from.

When can "L" be selected without harming the transmission?
Virtually any time unless you are going in reverse and slam it into L.

Is it more efficient to use "L" than "D" in normal city driving if you can tolerate the stronger regen when letting off the accelerator? Thanks - Nels
Probably depends on you driving style but a general answer would be that they are both the same. I have used both and find that I coast more which gives me a little more mileage. But you have to be aware of when and how to coast to get the most out of it. Day to day driving I would say D is more efficient. But others swear by L. So you will have to see what works for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,452 Posts
I only use L in stop and go driving as the manual says. you get the more efficient regeneration over a wider range of travel speeds using the brake pedal and "D", but some people prefer the psychological satisfaction of using "L", all the time. no harm in doing so that I know of, but it is unnecessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,439 Posts
Fine to use over 40 mph, or at any speed for any amount of time. I personally use it almost exclusively for going down steep hills as a way to control speed. I don't think it makes routine driving easier or more efficient.

I like that driving in D keeps me used to the way a normal car drives, and also causes the brake lights to work when slowing down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the replies! I know I come from the viewpoint of traditional automatic transmission but it "seems" as if the car is reluctant to slow down in L above 40 mph. I most assurely did not want to hurt anything by shifting into L at too high a speed. Thanks for the corrections, I will experiment more freely now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,130 Posts
Thanks for all the replies! I know I come from the viewpoint of traditional automatic transmission but it "seems" as if the car is reluctant to slow down in L above 40 mph. I most assurely did not want to hurt anything by shifting into L at too high a speed. Thanks for the corrections, I will experiment more freely now.

At 30 mph or 80 mph, when I'm in L and take my foot off the accelerator, the car slows down much quicker than it does in D.
You won't hurt anyone LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,556 Posts
I contend that if you are looking for the best range, you should avoid L altogether and avoid regen. I got better EV range in Normal D over L. For those who think you are saving your brakes, you really aren't. driving in D and using the brakes liberally still uses regen. By the time the regen stops and the blended brakes kick in, exclusive L drivers would be on the brake anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Like my fellow greenback troll, I'm not convinced there's any real advantage in using 'L'. I stopped using it while the car still had its new-car smell, except for stop-and-go.

The only thing GM advises, and I strongly agree, is to not use 'L' in slippery conditions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,416 Posts
Like my fellow greenback troll, I'm not convinced there's any real advantage in using 'L'. I stopped using it while the car still had its new-car smell, except for stop-and-go.

The only thing GM advises, and I strongly agree, is to not use 'L' in slippery conditions.
Stop-and-go, and down steep hills. I also slap it in L when coming in too fast to a red light or a tight turn, but that's just for fun. I don't really gain anything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,556 Posts
Like my fellow greenback troll, I'm not convinced there's any real advantage in using 'L'. I stopped using it while the car still had its new-car smell, except for stop-and-go.

The only thing GM advises, and I strongly agree, is to not use 'L' in slippery conditions.
And here, I disagree with GM, under certain conditions. During snowageddon 2, with Tires worn at about 28k miles I picked a day where the roads were snow-packed and then a layer of ice on top of that to do some experiments. The volt's traction control worked like a champ, but accelerating was really slow going because of the icy conditions. Any tap of the brakes would cause the antilock brakes to kick in, but slamming the shifter into low did a great job of slowing the car faster than the brakes with ABS working hard to prevent sliding. But all other conditions, I'm happy in D. When you realize that L is just a software mapping and not really a gear, you can truly appreciate this well designed car. Even Teslas don't do this blended regen and friction brakes - when you let go of the accelerator, you get regen, but when you tap the brakes, it's all friction brakes. With the volt, you tap the brake pedal and you get regen until the very last few feet, then friction brakes kick in.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,556 Posts
Stop-and-go, and down steep hills. I also slap it in L when coming in too fast to a red light or a tight turn, but that's just for fun. I don't really gain anything.
It's been a long time since we've had 3 greenback trolls (actually 2.75) on the same forum thread. We need some new blood. Anyone out there want to get nominated to be greenback troll 4.0?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,130 Posts
Like my fellow greenback troll, I'm not convinced there's any real advantage in using 'L'. I stopped using it while the car still had its new-car smell, except for stop-and-go.

The only thing GM advises, and I strongly agree, is to not use 'L' in slippery conditions.
The manual states "You can use L (Low) on very steep hills, in deep snow, or in mud.", those seem like slippery conditions
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
Top