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Let's see what VOLT owners are setting their tire pressures at?

  • Below 35 psi

    Votes: 1 0.7%
  • 35 - 37 psi

    Votes: 16 11.6%
  • 38 - 40 psi

    Votes: 89 64.5%
  • 41 - 43 psi

    Votes: 24 17.4%
  • 44 - 46 psi

    Votes: 7 5.1%
  • 47 - 50 psi

    Votes: 1 0.7%
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I'm usually around 40-41 depending on the ambient temperature.
 

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voltstats.net captures the psi stats from OnStar - maybe he can write a report to show those numbers across the 1000+ Volts represented...
 

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Knowing how hard the tire engineers work at finding the best combined performance for the OE tires, I very rarely go very far off the recommended pressures. For the Volt I set them at 38 psi and wait for them to drift down to 36 psi, then reset back to 38 psi. I've tried higher but don't like the ride and increased road noise.

VIN # B0985
 

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I run 45 psi front and rear. Handling is great, and it fun to not slow down for turns to further extend electric operation. I am getting 50 miles per charge even with some eco A/C use. Ride is good, and I don't notice any more tire noise compared to at 35 psi. Wear looks even accross the tread after about 10,000 mi at 45 psi.

GSP
 

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You're doing this by poll??? A lot of wrong answers doesn't make something right. Trust the tire engineers and the label displayed prominently when you open the driver's door.

By the way, this goes back all the way to the Corvair and Ralph Nader. People were putting air in the Corvair according to what they thought felt or looked right, with disastrous results. Ditto with the Ford Explorer and Firestone tires. The tire pressure labels have been around since at least the early 70's for good reason.
 

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For those of us without a Volt to open the driver's door, what is the recommendeded tire pressure range? It's not listed in the online owner's manual
 

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For those of us without a Volt to open the driver's door, what is the recommendeded tire pressure range? It's not listed in the online owner's manual
35 PSI for 2011 models, and 38 PSI for 2012. It's not in the owner's manual for good reason - the sticker is the gold source of information - on some vehicles (more with trucks than the Volt or cars), it depends on the wheel size and other options ordered.
 

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The Corvair problems were because people were clueless as to what the tire pressure should be. The Explorer fiasco was because too many people didn't care enough to pay attention to it (hence the mandating of the tire pressure monitors).

The Volt engineers have selected a good, effective low rolling resistance tire, so your tires and resulting ride don't have to be "like a rock" by overinflating them.
 

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35 PSI for 2011 models, and 38 PSI for 2012. It's not in the owner's manual for good reason - the sticker is the gold source of information - on some vehicles (more with trucks than the Volt or cars), it depends on the wheel size and other options ordered.
Interesting and of course obvious once you think about it -- which I hadn't! LOL

I more or less go with the recommended psi but on my MY 2011 I'm going more by the recommendation for the MY 2012 models on the theory that the different recommendations reflect moving up the learning curve since everything seems to have stayed the same. Can you think of any reasons why the recommendations vary between the years?

Overall I'm struck by the fact that Volt drivers know what their tire pressure is.
 

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I've attempting to put mine at 45, but I dont think they are. On two separate manual guages, they register at 45 PSI. But on ALL four of the tire pressure sensors, they register at 40. I dont know what to believe.
 

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I've attempting to put mine at 45, but I dont think they are. On two separate manual guages, they register at 45 PSI. But on ALL four of the tire pressure sensors, they register at 40. I dont know what to believe.
 

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I've attempting to put mine at 45, but I dont think they are. On two separate manual guages, they register at 45 PSI. But on ALL four of the tire pressure sensors, they register at 40. I dont know what to believe.
I would guess that the vehicle tire pressure sensors are more accurate than most consumer gauges. The manufacturers have more incentive to provide accurate information than the consumer gauge sellers. The only way to tell for sure is to have your "manual" gauges calibrated by an instrumentation calibration service.

VIN # B0985
 

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The "Cold" tire pressure varies with how cold at freezing temps my pressure is down to about 35 PSI, at 80 degrees it is much closer to 40 PSI.

Are there any real differences between the tires on the 2011s vs the 2012s?

I thoughtthe temp change in the recomendations in the manuales were due to oner suggestions, I think any thing between 35 and fourty is safe and will allow for good tire life, I don't mind the lower pressures at the colder temps as it may improve traction (a little more tire in contact with the road) yes the milliage/range is better at the higher presures, but at what point is safety and tire life effected.

Obviously, excedding the tire MFRs recomendations is pushing the limits.

Excedding the Carmanufactures limets by 10% will shift the compromises that were made in selecting that presure. Ride, traction, road noise, tire life and rolling resistance are all things that will change with pressure, some in one direction and some in the other.
 

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You're doing this by poll??? A lot of wrong answers doesn't make something right. Trust the tire engineers and the label displayed prominently when you open the driver's door.

By the way, this goes back all the way to the Corvair and Ralph Nader. People were putting air in the Corvair according to what they thought felt or looked right, with disastrous results. Ditto with the Ford Explorer and Firestone tires. The tire pressure labels have been around since at least the early 70's for good reason.
The Explorer issue was exactly the opposite problem -- people listening to Ford, rather than using common sense. Ford put lower pressure ratings on them to help with road noise and comfort.

Tire pressure isn't rocket science -- its the exact same for virtually every car out there -- 1psi per 100lbs of vehicle weight. The only time you need to vary that is when you're running unusual tires (r-compounds, etc) or have other things about the car that pull them out of spec. (I have to run upper 30's on my Cobra, even though the car is only 2200lbs because I'll shred the tires with all the torque otherwise!)

But for any normal vehicle, 1psi/100lbs is the rule of thumb. (Ford's recommendation on the Explorer was 1psi/160lbs -- far too low to maintain the structure of the tire.)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I have and will selectively add more pressure (still within the tire mfg pressures) on some specific days when I am just short of my EV range and the road is smooth. I have a couple of those "runs" where another 3-4 miles keeps me from running the ICE.
 

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38 all around, down from 40. Up from the about 34 it came with.
 

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Tire Pressure

I have only had my Volt for 10 days. Yesterday the Low Tire Pressure Warning came on (to my surprise). After some fumbling I got the DIC readout to tell me the pressures -- they were [email protected], [email protected] [email protected] This all seemed normal until I noticed the placard on the driver's door that said the cold pressure was supposed to be 38 psi. This seems high but my Volt adviser confirmed it was correct. So I guess the normal cold tire pressure in the Volt needs to be considerably higher than a typical car? Does anyone out there know the psi value for any tire to get the low pressure warning? Also is there a pressure differential that will set it off?
Meanwhile all this happened b4 I knew of this forum. Having now read many other posts on tire pressure I understand better that a higher psi is needed. But I'd still like to find out, if anyone knows, what is the low pressure trip point that causes the driver to be alerted.
 

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I have only had my Volt for 10 days. Yesterday the Low Tire Pressure Warning came on (to my surprise). After some fumbling I got the DIC readout to tell me the pressures -- they were [email protected], [email protected] [email protected] This all seemed normal until I noticed the placard on the driver's door that said the cold pressure was supposed to be 38 psi. This seems high but my Volt adviser confirmed it was correct. So I guess the normal cold tire pressure in the Volt needs to be considerably higher than a typical car? Does anyone out there know the psi value for any tire to get the low pressure warning? Also is there a pressure differential that will set it off?
Meanwhile all this happened b4 I knew of this forum. Having now read many other posts on tire pressure I understand better that a higher psi is needed. But I'd still like to find out, if anyone knows, what is the low pressure trip point that causes the driver to be alerted.
Not sure of the exact number but we know this:
Tire Pressure Monitoring System Operation

The tyre pressure monitor system warns the driver when a significant loss or gain of tyre pressure occurs in any of the 4 tyres. It allows the driver to display the individual tyre pressures and their locations on the driver information centre.

The system uses the body control module (BCM), driver information centre, instrument cluster, remote control door lock receiver, tyre pressure indicator module and a radio frequency transmitting pressure sensor in each tyre assembly. Each sensor has an internal power supply.

When the vehicle is stationary, the sensors internal accelerometer is inactive which puts the sensors into a Stationary state. In this state the sensors sample tire pressure once every 30 seconds and do not transmit at all if the tire pressure does not change. As vehicle speed increases, centrifugal force closes the sensors internal roll switch, which puts the sensor into Wake and then Drive mode. The remote control door lock receiver receives and then sends the tyre pressure and temperature data to the body control module (BCM). The tyre pressure indicator module sends sensor ID and location data to the BCM. The BCM translates the data contained in the tire pressure sensor radio frequency transmissions into sensor presence, sensor mode, and tire pressure. Once vehicle speed is greater than 40 km/h (25 MPH), the remote control door lock receiver waits for the sensors to go into Drive mode.

Each sensor has its own unique identification (ID) code which it transmits as part of each RF message and must be learned into the BCM memory. Once all 4 ID's have been learned and vehicle speed is greater than 40 km/h (25 mph), the BCM continuously compares ID's and pressure data in the received transmissions to the learned ID's and pressures to determine if all 4 sensors are present and if one or more tyres are low. If the BCM detects a low tyre pressure condition, a variation in pressure between 2 tyres on the same axle, or a malfunction in the system, it will send a serial data message to the instrument cluster requesting the appropriate tyre pressure monitor indicator illumination and also to display the appropriate data message on the driver information centre, if equipped.

The sensors continuously compare their last pressure sample to their current pressure sample and will transmit in Learn Mode-Pressure Triggered if a 8.3 kPa (1.2 PSI) change in tyre pressure has been detected in either a Stationary or Drive state. When the tyre pressure system detects a significant loss, or gain of tyre pressure, the tyre pressure monitor indicator icon is continuously illuminated on the instrument cluster and if equipped, a check tyre pressure type message is displayed on the driver information centre.

Both the indicator icon and driver information centre message can be cleared by adjusting the tyre pressures to the recommended kPa/PSI and driving the vehicle above 40 km/h (25 MPH) for at least 9 minutes.

If power is disconnected from the BCM or if the vehicle battery is disconnected each tire pressure sensor ID is retained but all of the tire pressure information is lost. Under these circumstances the BCM cannot assume that the tire pressures were maintained over an unknown period of time. Cars equipped with the driver information centre will display dashes and the scan tool will indicate a default tyre pressure value of 1020 kPa (148 PSI) for each tyre. To reactivate the sensors, the vehicle must be driven above 40 km/h (25 MPH) for at least 9 minutes. When the sensors are activated, the driver information centre displays the current tyre pressures.

The BCM has the ability to detect malfunctions within the tire pressure monitor system. In the event a DTC is set, the tyre pressure monitor indicator icon on the instrument cluster will flash for 1 min. and then remain illuminated after the power switch is turned ON and the instrument cluster bulb check has been completed. Any malfunction detected will cause the driver information center to display a service tire monitor system type message.
 
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