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Did you convert your OEM EVSE to do L1 / L2 charging?

  • Successfully made/acquired an adapter for 2015 Gen1 and 2016+ Gen2 for L1/L2

    Votes: 45 35.4%
  • Successfully converted my 13-14 Clipper Creek to L1/L2

    Votes: 19 15.0%
  • I was not aware of these easy mods to the OEM EVSE, investigating now

    Votes: 4 3.1%
  • I've got an aftermarket L2 EVSE and keep the OEM in the trunk

    Votes: 43 33.9%
  • L1 is fine for me or I have no access to a 240V outlet

    Votes: 14 11.0%
  • I'm scared it will catch my car on fire

    Votes: 2 1.6%

  • Total voters
    127
21 - 36 of 36 Posts

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If you are using the OEM charge made for 120V and running 240V through it doesn't shorten it's useful life?
No. That would be kind of like thinking that your eyes would wear out quicker if you only ever saw beauty.
 

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We have two Volts. One is on a ClipperCreek LCS-20 and the other is on the OEM EVSE with a 240v adapter. The second OEM unit we have (since each car came with one, of course) is used as a spare if we need to park outside, where the 240v cables won't reach, or if we need to take it with us on a trip (hasn't happened yet).
 

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Did the exact same. Nice to have one OEM EVSE for trips.
 

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I did the 4 wire mod on a 2013-2014 EVSE, works fine. FWIW, my early 2015 came with the 2014 style. I will keep that one stock. I have a 15A breaker to the 14-50 receptacle to protect the 12A rated EVSE.

 

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I successfully converted my 2013 stock/OEM EVSE to L2 by removing the internal 120/240v jumper and building two twist-lock connector adapters, one each for 240v 4 conductor, and one for 120v 3 conductor. I followed the instructions in this video: https://youtu.be/D2-_pfCtPu4

BOM (USD) was about $70:
2 240V 20A 4 pin twist-lock female connectors (~$15 ea)
1 240V 20A 4 pin twist-lock male connector (~$20)
1 240V 30A 4 pin 6 foot dryer cord (~$20)

Things I already had:
240V 30A 4 pin socket for my dryer (I did have to install this, since my dryer and socket were both 3 conductor H1, H2, and Neutral, not H1, H2, Neutral, and Ground)
240v 30A 4 pin plug for my dryer (I had to install this, too)
Grounding/earthing post and ground wire (I had to run these myself, since there was no ground to the socket. Easy, since the dryer outlet is on an exterior wall)
Flux core Solder
Soldering iron
Wire strippers
Torx T20 long security socket ($2 to buy one, so not really a big deal. There's plenty of room in the screw holes to fit the socket style if you don't want to buy a security tip screwdriver or can't source one easily) Mine has a 1 1/4 inch shaft, and I think it's 3/8" drive (whatever the small-ish square drive is you sometimes see on cheap-o screwdriver/bit adapters from computer repair kits (not precision kits).
Drill and drill bit to widen the strain-relief boot that the original tail feeds through.

I cut the 6' dryer cord in half so I didn't have to separately source the proper cable for the new power tail for the EVSE.

Things to keep in mind:
The 2013 Clipper Creek OEM EVSE with the handle needs to sense ground/earth to work. Just tying into Neutral did not work for me when I tried the three pin configuration.
If you think you have everything right, but it throws a fault when the relay tries to kick over and supply power for charging on 120v, but not 240v, your jumper wire is probably bridging the wrong two pins. Open up your female connector on the 120v adapter and double-check that you're bridging an H and Neutral (I think) instead of H1 to H2


At some point, I will probably pick up a second OEM L1 EVSE and keep in in the car for backup and keep it stock, since the thicker cord on my 240v 4 wire 30A input makes it a bit bulky at 3 feet of tail. It's not impossible to wind this so it fits in the portable EVSE slot under the deck, but it is a little bit of a pain, and wrapping must be tight to fit the tolerances of the compartment.
 

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Just wanted to chime in here to say that I successfully converted the 2014 Lear ESVE with the simple adapter 120 to 240. No issues, no excessive heat. In use for a couple weeks now, daily charging. Thanks for all the info. Amazingly simple and cheap once the "secret" of the Lear unit was revealed.

Again, many thanks.
 

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Did the exact same. Nice to have one OEM EVSE for trips.
That's what I did too. I keep one stock EVSE in the car, along with the 240 adapter that I got from Chris, then I keep the other stock EVSE that came with the car plugged in my garage at home. I charge at 12 Amps on my 110 outlet and then use the 240V adapter in Yakima at my Mom's house. We make the trip from home here in Belfair, WA to Yakima, WA to visit Mom about once a month or more. I had a 240 dedicated circuit with a 50 Amp breaker for future use. Nice to be able to get a full charge in less than 5 hours while visiting Mom. Overnight on 110 works fine for us here back home.
 

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I've voided the warranty on the EVSE that came with my new-to-me '14 by converting it to a three wire 120/240 configuration.
Charge efficiency has improved from just under 30% loss (13 kWh from the grid to put 10 kWh into the battery) at 120V, to just a touch over 17% loss (11.7 kWh from the grid for 10 kWh into the battery) on 240.
As in the post #2 I retained the 5-15 plug to permit operation on 120 volt, and made a 6-20 plug to 5-15 receptacle adapter to connect to my home 240 outlet. I did add a padlock boot to the adapter to minimize opportunity of plugging a 120 max. device into the 240 circuit.
 

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I have read most of the posts and threads on using the (2018 Volt Clipper Creek) stock EVSE and pigtail.

I am starting from scratch, running a 240V circuit from the box, about a 15' run, and making a pigtail.

I have quite a bit of experience with 120V circuit work, but have only done two 240V circuits, that I can remember, in my life.

There are a lot of choices for sockets and plugs, etc. Is there a shopping list of parts for may case? Which conductor and plugs/receptacles would you use if starting from scratch? Or can you point me to a succinct good shopping list and recommendations? I HATE multiple trips to the HW store!
 

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I have read most of the posts and threads on using the (2018 Volt Clipper Creek) stock EVSE and pigtail.

I am starting from scratch, running a 240V circuit from the box, about a 15' run, and making a pigtail.

I have quite a bit of experience with 120V circuit work, but have only done two 240V circuits, that I can remember, in my life.

There are a lot of choices for sockets and plugs, etc. Is there a shopping list of parts for may case? Which conductor and plugs/receptacles would you use if starting from scratch? Or can you point me to a succinct good shopping list and recommendations? I HATE multiple trips to the HW store!
If you are capable of working inside the electrical panel then for 230/240V circuit you know you will need a double pole breaker. The breaker rating (maximum amperage) will be determined by the equipment you plan to connect to the circuit. If you are wiring strictly for a Volt then a 20 amp double pole breaker is the minimum needed for charging a Volt at Level 2 (16 amp maximum for 3.6kW charging. A 40/50 amp breaker is needed for 32 amps for 7.2kW charging (this is only available on 2019 Volt.)

If your electrical service has the capacity then consider a 30, 40 or 50 amp breaker. If you are hard wiring the EVSE then you won't need to buy a receptacle but you may need to install a service disconnect near the EVSE (consult your local electrical code.) If you have no concerns about the home's electrical service being close to being maxed out then consider a 50 amp breaker with a NEMA 14-50R receptacle. This will future proof the 230/240V circuit for future level 2 charging applications.

Note that the 2019 Volt is now available with a 7.2kW on-board charger (this is now standard on the 2019 Volt Premier, optional on the 2019 Volt LT) so if you need to charge at up to 32 amps for the 7.2kW charger then you would need to install a 40 or 50 amp dedicated circuit to support this load. If you will be terminating the 230/240V circuit at a receptacle the receptacle needs to match the rating of the circuit breaker. The pigtail you build for the OE EVSE will need to have a 230V/240V plug to match the receptacle.

If you go to the ClipperCreek web site you will see that they offer their Level 2 EVSEs with common 30, 50 amp rated plugs (L6-30P, 14-30P, 6-50P 14-50P. If you look up the Tesla Mobile Connector (Tesla's portable EVSE) a wide variety of optional pigtail plugs are available for most any charging application (the Mobile Connector comes with 5-15P (for 120V) and 14-50P (for 230/240V) pigtail connectors. If you decide on a 20 amp circuit then a suitable 20 amp receptacle would be 6-20R. While the OE EVSE is limited to 12 amps and you could install a dedicated 15 amp 230/240V circuit it makes more sense to make this at least a 20 amp circuit. (The only reason to install a 15 amp 230/240 circuit is if you are converting an existing dedicated 15 amp 120V circuit.)

You want to avoid any possibility of someone mistaking the 230/240V receptacle you will be installing for a 120V receptacle and plugging in 120V equipment into this outlet.
 

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Thanks,

Got the job done last night. I went with 8ga conductor (30 total foot run), 6-20R wall socket, 6-20P and 5-20R for the adapter, and a 20 Amp two pole breaker (all connectors and socket are industrial grade) By the time I got conduit and all the bits, it cost $162 and 6 hours of my labor. Is working fine....center screen shows "charge Station" and I can now charge completely in the cheapest time frame (hourly rate customer).

Now my son wants me to convert his 2013 EVSE and run a 50 Amp circuit for his anticipated future Bolt purchase (or some other unknown yet unreleased model). That'll be a spendy endeavor.
 

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Thanks,

Got the job done last night. I went with 8ga conductor (30 total foot run), 6-20R wall socket, 6-20P and 5-20R for the adapter, and a 20 Amp two pole breaker (all connectors and socket are industrial grade) By the time I got conduit and all the bits, it cost $162 and 6 hours of my labor. Is working fine....center screen shows "charge Station" and I can now charge completely in the cheapest time frame (hourly rate customer).

Now my son wants me to convert his 2013 EVSE and run a 50 Amp circuit for his anticipated future Bolt purchase (or some other unknown yet unreleased model). That'll be a spendy endeavor.
if you ever decide you want to change/upgrade the breaker and the 6-20R wall socket the 8 gauge wire you installed will probably be able to support 50 amp service.
 

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That was the idea. Bending 3/4" conduit, fishing and pulling wire was the hardest part. Wanted to leave excess capacity, just in case.
 

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Oops, wait I ran 10ga, not 8. Not sure what I was thinking when I posted. That's good for only 30 amps, if I read the charts correctly. For my son's longer run, I think I'll have to pull 6ga.
 

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Late to the game, may have overlooked a post with the answer already posted, but here goes... Maybe one of you geniuses can guide me (and perhaps others).

Our 2015 Volt has been a joy, and we can recharge the battery overnight on 110v, no problem. My Beloved is able to do all her daily commutes without problem with the normal 32-36 mile range this affords her. We keep the OEM EVSE in the trunk, as I bought an extra that's permanently installed in her part of the garage so we don't have to pack/unpack the thing every time we charge the car... We just leave it plugged in to the Volt whenever it's not being used.

With the COVID19 madness, I was cleaning out our garages, and discovered this plug behind an old set of shelves I threw away. It's hot, 240v, and I had totally forgotten about it. Back in the day I had used it for a welder that I no longer own.



So an idle search of this forum led me down several rabbit holes, which led me to these two YouTube videos:


(The EVSE that came with our Volt has the identical sticker and numbers on the side)




And then to this Amazon offering:

TopoLite Plug Adapters 2-Pack 120V to 240V for Hydroponic Indoor Plants Growing Grow Light Fixture Kit Accessories (2Pcs(120 to 240V))

...which are a pair for less than $13 shipped.

So you know where I'm going with this: Will plugging this adapter into the 240v outlet and our OEM 2015 Volt Charger into it result in Level 2 charging with no other drama?

Again, don't need to do it, but sure would be nice to have... And it might be valuable information for others to have... Level 2 for $13? Can anyone chime in on this? TIA
 
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