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Discussion Starter #1
Discovered today that my MY 2012 with 5200 miles has a bubble in the sidewall of the front right tire, a GoodYear Assurance 94V 215/55R17. Neither my dealer nor my local tire retailer have that tire in stock. Neither will order one until they have seen the tire.

Will appreciate advice re the following questions:

1) What has been the GM/GoodYear policy re sidewall bubbles? Do they assert that they are the result of road hazard or do they accept responsibility for a product defect?

2) If a replacement tire cannot be obtained in a timely fashion, might the dealer provide a loaner vehicle?

3) Is there another brand/model tire that can be mixed with the OE tires (one with three) without causing a driveability or stability problem?

4) Sears carries the "Goodyear Assurance ComforTred Touring Tire - 215/55R17 94V BSW" for $161 plus the usual adders for shipping and installation of the new tire and disposal of the old one. Is that the right tire and is it a reasonable price?

5) TireRack carries the OE tire for $139 + $18 shipping and an estimated delivery date of Monday, 8/27. That is probably the best price I will find but I don't like driving on a tire with a bubble and will do what I can to have it replaced sooner. Comments welcome on driving with a bubble and on how to obtain the soonest replacement.

Thanks in advance for sharing your thoughts regarding these questions.

KNS
 

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I haven't heard of this issue in relation to the Volt, but I have heard of it happening in other vehicles with different OEM tires. In each case, the dealer/company replaced the tire (they considered it defective).

You should be able to drive on it, as long as it is holding its tire pressure. Just be careful and take it easy.

Also, if the dealer won't pay for the replacement, TireRack is probably your best option. But I would take it to the dealer ASAP.
 

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Another great reason to get the Tire Plus Guarantee. Fix or replace, anytime rotate and balance to 65000 miles for $99. 4 tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I haven't heard of this issue in relation to the Volt, but I have heard of it happening in other vehicles with different OEM tires. In each case, the dealer/company replaced the tire (they considered it defective).

You should be able to drive on it, as long as it is holding its tire pressure. Just be careful and take it easy.

Also, if the dealer won't pay for the replacement, TireRack is probably your best option. But I would take it to the dealer ASAP.
Thanks. Good to know there is a good chance the dealer might consider it defective.

KNS
 

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Discovered today that my MY 2012 with 5200 miles has a bubble in the sidewall of the front right tire, a GoodYear Assurance 94V 215/55R17. Neither my dealer nor my local tire retailer have that tire in stock. Neither will order one until they have seen the tire.

Will appreciate advice re the following questions:

1) What has been the GM/GoodYear policy re sidewall bubbles? Do they assert that they are the result of road hazard or do they accept responsibility for a product defect?

2) If a replacement tire cannot be obtained in a timely fashion, might the dealer provide a loaner vehicle?

3) Is there another brand/model tire that can be mixed with the OE tires (one with three) without causing a driveability or stability problem?

4) Sears carries the "Goodyear Assurance ComforTred Touring Tire - 215/55R17 94V BSW" for $161 plus the usual adders for shipping and installation of the new tire and disposal of the old one. Is that the right tire and is it a reasonable price?

5) TireRack carries the OE tire for $139 + $18 shipping and an estimated delivery date of Monday, 8/27. That is probably the best price I will find but I don't like driving on a tire with a bubble and will do what I can to have it replaced sooner. Comments welcome on driving with a bubble and on how to obtain the soonest replacement.

Thanks in advance for sharing your thoughts regarding these questions.

KNS


A bubble in the side wall indicates layer separation and it is dangerous to drive on the tire.
The sidewall get heavily stressed when driving and the bubble can burst and you'll have a blowup.
A bubble is cause either by hitting the curb, and then you'll see visible marks, or, a defect in the tire, that would be covered by tire warranty..
 

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This sounds like it could have been delivery damage. I think your dealer should handle this for you. You might also want to contact your Volt advisor about it.
 

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I got a tire on a previous car (not a Volt) with a bubble on the side. That bubble took some time (2-3 weeks after noticing bubble) before the bubble started leaking air and the tire went flat.

The tire is non repairable and the goo will not fix a busted bubble (don't use the goo supplied with the air compressor with a busted bubble it will be uselessly waisted).

If there are no scratches on the side of the tire, then it's definitively a manufacturing defect covered by the GoodYear warranty.
(GM does not warranty the tires). Bring it back at the dealership so they can order you a new one on tire warranty coverage.

François
B2653
2.3kW solar grid tie
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks all for sharing, especially the safety warning.

Thanks all for sharing, especially the safety warning.

The tires, and the rest of the car, were in pristine condition on delivery and the bubble wasn't there as recently as a week ago. I took a closer look at it this morning. Scuffs on the tire and scratches on the wheel cover suggest that I did hit something. Based on that I will attempt to get it replaced as quickly as possible rather than risk delay while doing battle over possible warranty coverage.

Thanks again!!

KNS
 

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This is definitely a safety hazard! The dealer should replace it under warranty. As Arie mentioned, this is separation between the layers of the tire. Some years ago I had gone on a camping trip with family and friends. We had both a boat and camper. As we were preparing to leave we noticed a bubble in the tire of the boat trailer. It wasn't a lengthy trip home, so we decided to drive on it. About 20 minutes into the trip, on the highway, I was in the vehicle behind the boat when we started noticing pieces of rubber hitting our windshield. We called the other driver and immediately replaced the tire.
In your situation, it could be only a matter of time before the separation spreads and leads to a blowout!
 
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