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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Figured I'd share this. Put it together today because I'm quite sick of people claiming that PHEVs/EVs are only for tree huggers and will never repay the price premium versus competitive vehicles. I feel the values I've put in the attached sheet are rather realistic, but the great thing is the blocked-off cells can be modified to reflect your experiences/anticipated figures and to compare the costs based on your usage. I think this would be a useful purchasing tool for anyone considering a PHEV.

I'm sure there are some variables that I could have calculated differently. I'm not a math major, but I have a decent idea of how this would work. Let me know if you have any ideas on how to improve the chart. My plan was to use values that most people would be familiar with from their car's efficiency displays.

I picked a Civic EX 2.0T as the comp because it's a popular model, is competitively sized, and the price delta versus package features seemed closest to what was available in a base LT or Prime.

The chart does not even account for the drastically reduced maintenance costs associated with PHEV ownership.

Welcome all input to modify/improve this. Please let me know what you think. Had to upload as Zip due to forum restrictions.

View attachment PHEV Financial Impact Spreadsheet.zip
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Excellent spreadsheet, thanks very much! I will make use of it. One thing you might add is sales tax. This is a negative of paying the higher up front cost of the Volt.
I thought about it, but the great difference in sales taxes by state/county made it hard to configure, and I thought could have made the chart unwieldy (even more than it already is). Even if in a state with a higher vehicle purchase tax (say 6%), the difference in tax for a $31,000 vs. $21,000 vehicle is only $600. While not insignificant, I thought that could be lumped into the purchase price figure as an "out the door" figure to be used in negotiations.

Even so, we're talking about a 2-year payback period.

If someone wants to take a stab at estimated resale at 3, 5, and 9 years, we could go really next level on this.

Edit: Upon thinking about it more, yeah, I should've included tax and made it variable for the user to input the rate, but just ran out of gas in creating the sheet (no pun initially intended, but pun intended after I read it).
 

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I appreciate the work that went into the spreadsheet.

All I know is that after $2500 in GM discounts, $3500 in dealer discounts, $1500 rebate from the state of California, and $7500 tax credit from the fed, I got a Volt for about $20k. I could get a cheaper all-gas car, but it would be cheaper in every respect, and driving electrically is worth something to me in itself--no need for it to pay for itself.

Jan
 

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My Volt's total price was $14,600 after tax rebates and insurance payout from my (hail) totaled Cruze. If I had purchased a new Cruze my total price would have been about $6,000 more than the Volt.
 

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Jonesy,

I am trying to use this spreadsheet to compare cars. I wanted to add a column for a Honda Clarity. The confusing part for me are lines 5-11. What is the difference between mpge observed vs. mpg govt rated? Wouldn't it be easier to use miles/kwh? I guess there are no public figures for miles/kwh?
 

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Jonesy,

I am trying to use this spreadsheet to compare cars. I wanted to add a column for a Honda Clarity. The confusing part for me are lines 5-11. What is the difference between mpge observed vs. mpg govt rated? Wouldn't it be easier to use miles/kwh? I guess there are no public figures for miles/kwh?
Hey Jake, somehow my other account got locked up. Gonna contact admin about that soon.

MPGe observed is what you see on the infotainment unit/dash as your reported MPGe. I included it because electric efficiency can vary so much based on weather and driving habits, and because the EPA's figures seem a lot lower than what most of us are seeing. My guess is that the EPA's tests don't adequately account for the impact of regenerative braking.

mi/kWh would have been useful, but I thought it was a more difficult stat to assess on most cars compared to the MPGe that pops up on the display and that people can compare from Gov't ratings.

Observed MPGe is really more for getting an exact figure for your own car rather than a comparison stat.

My guess is that your cost to operate is going to be near identical on both vehicles. They're nearly identical in fuel and electric efficiency and range, which means your usage ratios are going to be extremely close. They're also very close in actual OTD purchase price in most areas and have the same tax credit. I also used the ratio of the observed MPGe over the Gov. rated MPGe as a multiplier to use with the stated range, so you'll see that number increase if you increase the MPGe.

I was actually going to put the Clarity in when I first made the sheet, but decided that it was so close to the Volt that it was not worth the trouble, and the more efficient, less expensive (on sticker at least), lower range, lower credit Prius Prime would be a much more interesting comp.

In the grand scheme of things, if you're trying to do an apples to apples comparison, it's probably smarter to just leave the government rated figures in for both cars, as you won't have seen the average MPGe over a long period of time in either vehicle, and the increases in efficiency will be marginal and likely similar for both cars. Increasing the observed MPGe also ties into extending the range of the vehicle.

My suggestion to make it easy is to highlight and copy and paste the Prime column, rename it Clarity, and modify only the blocked and bolded cells. Changing any other cell will delete a formula and mess with the way the whole column works together.
 
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