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I have a few people in the area changing 15$ per session for level 3 DC fast charging.The time is about 30 min . I have read charging ur car is 1$ or so per charge
What will happen if greed gets ahead of the environment goal
 

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I have a few people in the area changing 15$ per session for level 3 charging. I have read charging ur car is 1$ or so per charge
What will happen if greed gets ahead of the environment goal
If saving the environment is someone's goal, then does price really matter?
 

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I've paid $2 per hour. The Chargepoint in my area ups the rate to $8 per hour after 4 hours to encourage you to move you car rather than park there all day long. Those commercial charging stations aren't cheap, and they cannot just give you electricity at cost, they have to make some money or at a minimum break even.

I'm starting to pay these high fees just to give OPEC the middle finger. My next ice vehicle will be E85 (if available), and I'll fill it with E85 just to cut down my Dino juice consumption.
 

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I have a few people in the area changing 15$ per session for level 3 charging.The time is about 30 min . I have read charging ur car is 1$ or so per charge
What will happen if greed gets ahead of the environment goal
90% or more of EV charging is done at home or work these days, and that will likely continue to be true. If you don't need the expensive DCFC very often, the excessive price really doesn't affect your overall cost that much.

I think the most likely long term effect of overpriced networks like that is to push more customers to Tesla, where they know they'll get a much larger, more reliable network of faster chargers and only pay ~20% more than electricity costs at home for the fast charging, once Tesla and the others are offering fairly similar cars at comparable prices.

That will likely drive prices down on either the other cars or the DCFC - either as a general policy change or through manufacturer sponsored programs like Nissan's 'No charge to charge.'
 

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With our 2016 Volt and a conservative 45 mpg just on gas. If a full charge of electricity cost me $4.00 or more and gas is $2.50 / gal. The cost to drive 55 miles (full charge of electricity) would be less on gasoline: $4.00 for electricity and $3.05 for gas. The cut off point for gas vs electricity would be about $3.00 for a charge if gas is $2.50 / gal.
 

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If I had a Volt or a Bolt EV I would never pay for an external charge. Either way. I will charge at home 99.99% of the time because any EV has enough range for me to cover a full day's run and an overnight charge at home. And for the .01% I may be charging at the place I visit for free.
 

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The irony is that like ONE charging company makes a slight profit...Any DCFC station is expensive, many claim the 25KW DCFC is already obsolete, 50KW seems to be the norm but soon 350KW will be coming out...
 

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If gas is the only cost, and cost is the only benefit.

Personally​, I just think the car drives better on electric and I really don't like trips to get my oil changed.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using Tapatalk
 

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I have a few people in the area changing 15$ per session for level 3 DC fast charging.The time is about 30 min . I have read charging ur car is 1$ or so per charge
What will happen if greed gets ahead of the environment goal
You posted this in the Volt forum. The Volt doesn't use Level 3 DCFC. My Volt costs me about $1.30 to fully charge 40 miles whether level 1 120V (about 10 hours) or level 2 240V (about 4 hours).

On the other hand, the Bolt can take advantage of DCFC. A Bolt is capable of adding up to 90 miles in 30 minutes using level 3 DCFC. So 40 miles in about 13 minutes versus 4 hours with a Volt (depending on state of charge, temperature, DCFC rating).

Of course, you could use a level 2 240V public charger instead if it is cheaper, it can add about 20 miles an hour to a Bolt.

Regardless, I have used public charging for my Volt only a few times in the last 6 years. I expect it to be less with a Bolt given it's less likely for me to need a topping off because of the much larger battery size/driving range. Instead, I'd be charging at home along with the Volt.
 

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I look at DC charging as being reserved for special situations when you really need to charge. So the price isn't that significant. Much rather have it available at a high price than not available. This may change as more people living in condos and apartments get electric cars, but for now the price isn't that relevant.

Not that different than buying gas for the Volt. The only time I need to buy gas is when I'm going on a longer trip, and in these cases the price of gas just is part of the cost of the trip. Doesn't seem like a big deal. So much so I don't even pay attention to the price of the gas.
 

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I have a few people in the area changing 15$ per session for level 3 DC fast charging.The time is about 30 min . I have read charging ur car is 1$ or so per charge
What will happen if greed gets ahead of the environment goal
I see from you profile your from Mississauga. Most of the DC fast charge stations in that area have 60min sessions.

The cost to fully charge the car depends on the car. A Volt can't use DC fast charge and in Ontario using off-peak rates costs $1.75 to fully charge. On peak would cost a little over $3. (my costs include all transmission, taxes and fees).

A car like the Nissan Leaf can use the DC fast chargers. They take about 30mins to hit 80% charge and the cost of electricity to do so is about $2.75 off peak to $5 on peak (24KWh version).

A Bolt EV with a much larger battery takes about 75mins to hit 80% charge. Cost of electricity for a 60min charge (starting at about 5% State of charge) would be about $5 off peak and about $8 on peak.

$15 per hour isn't terrible as most people charge at home and DC is only needed for the occasional longer trip. But it would be best if that rate was pro-rated per minute.
 

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A car like the Nissan Leaf can use the DC fast chargers. They take about 30mins to hit 80% charge and the cost of electricity to do so is about $2.75 off peak to $5 on peak (24KWh version).
Why would peak/off peak rates apply to a DC fast charger when Level III charging is only for commercial charging installations? I thought TOU rate plans only apply to residential installations?
 

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No one who drives a Volt should even care what it costs to charge at a commercial station. Unless gas hits about 5 bucks/gallon it's unlikely it would ever be cheaper than using the ICE until you can get home and charge for pennies.
 

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Why would peak/off peak rates apply to a DC fast charger when Level III charging is only for commercial charging installations? I thought TOU rate plans only apply to residential installations?
IT probably varies by utility/location, but I don't see any reason why they wouldn't use time of use rates to encourage businesses to use power when it's more available.

A lot of newer big buildings are designed with ice based HVAC, which I think exists solely because it can use cheap overnight power to freeze water for the next day's cooling.
 

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Businesses and government installations already have automated lighting and HVAC systems that operate on schedule, shutdown when not needed. Exceptions include hospitals, data centers, distribution centers etc. that operate 24x7. For other businesses, you can't encourage off-peak power usage after the time that the workforce normally goes home.
 

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Why would peak/off peak rates apply to a DC fast charger when Level III charging is only for commercial charging installations? I thought TOU rate plans only apply to residential installations?
It doesn't vary that wan't my point. The op was asking why does a DC fast charger charge $15 when the electricity to charge said vehicle is significantly cheaper (if charged at utility rates).
 

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It doesn't vary that wan't my point. The op was asking why does a DC fast charger charge $15 when the electricity to charge said vehicle is significantly cheaper (if charged at utility rates).
Thanks. Some commercial charging installations charge $0.49 - $0.59 per kwh for DCFC so $15 for 30 minutes is not overly high priced.
 

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I have a few people in the area changing 15$ per session for level 3 DC fast charging.The time is about 30 min . I have read charging ur car is 1$ or so per charge
What will happen if greed gets ahead of the environment goal
Eventually, the market will be large enough and competition will drive pricing. Right now, it is a niche .. and prices are all over the place. THis is one of the reasons why EREVs like Volt make the best sense for the short to mid-term
 

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I have a few people in the area changing 15$ per session for level 3 DC fast charging.The time is about 30 min . I have read charging ur car is 1$ or so per charge
What will happen if greed gets ahead of the environment goal
Cost of hardware.
Cost of installation.
Cost of site.
Cost of maintenance.
Demand charge.
Energy charge.

Now consider that if a session is 30 minutes they can serve a maximum of 48 cars per day and in reality it will be a lot less because: (a) there aren't that many BEVs right now (b) BEVs are usually charged at home (c) if it's occupied, a potential customer will go elsewhere (d) people won't normally charge in the middle of the night.

It's really hard to price.

However, it's also important to note that fast chargers are usually a lot cheaper if you are a regular user paying a monthly subscription, because those subs help pay the overheads and non-Energy costs like demand charges.

Don't expect charger pricing to be like gasoline pricing. Chargers simply don't have the volume to support PAYG well.
 

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If you live someplace EVgo operates, just get the "on the go" plan for away-from-home charging. Then charging is a buck and hour for Lvl2, or $0.10 per minute for CCS. So that 30 minute session will be $3. (If you have one of the other plans, the SESSION cost is $5 + $0.20 per minute, and a half-hour charge is $11. Which is ... expensive, but not TERRIBLE if you're low enough that the 30 minutes is gonna put 75-100 miles on. It's even almost reasonable for a Gen 1 Volt, when a nearly full charge is $4 vs $3 for a gallon of gas.
 
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