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Discussion Starter #1
3 Days ago the Oregon Supreme Court ruled in favor for the $2,500 electric vehicle rebate which includes new Volts, and with the $7,500 Fed tax credit and the new rebate Oregon residents who qualify for the Fed tax credit will get a total of $10,000 off a new Volt which could bring the price of a new Volt in Oregon well below $20,000 if you get a good deal from a dealer.

Here is the link:

https://www.oregon.gov/deq/FilterDocs/zev-faq.pdf
 

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The Standard rebate and the Charge Ahead rebate are both $2,500, and if you are eligible for the Charge Ahead rebate, you may be eligible for both rebates. Of course, eligibility for the Charge Ahead rebate (BEVs only, no Volts) because of low or moderate income also implies you won’t get much from the Federal Tax Credit.

I also note from the oregon.gov/deq website that the Charge Ahead rebate would provide rebates for the purchase or lease of new or used zero-emission vehicles if the purchaser is from a low or moderate income household, resides in an area of the state with poor air quality due to transportation emissions, and scraps an internal combustion engine car that is at least 20 years old (conditions still being finalized by the DEQ).
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I don't see many low income households buying an electric car. Most electric cars, plug in electric hybrids, and hybrids as well
are seldom purchased by low income households. I would imagine the average household salary for these electric/plug in/hybrid vehicle owners would be somewhere in the neighborhood of $100,000 +.
 

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I kinda see that as a good thing. The help goes to those that really need a push to do "the right thing" (buying an EV) and if that's not the primary market, it means you're actually creating new owners rather than just giving money to reward people for doing what they were already going to do. Plus, it may help to keep the cost of the program lower, which means it's more likely to stick around. A rebate program that only ends up costing a few hundred grand is much more likely to be renewed on a feel-good basis than one that costs a few hundred million.
 

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I am happy that Oregon is continuing to encourage the growth of the industry by offer these rebates. I participated in ECOtotality’s EV Project by purchasing a new 2012 Volt in April of that year, and was rewarded by qualifying for having a Blink L2 charger installed in my garage at no cost (it’s still working!).

Unfortunately, neither the Oregon DEQ nor the Forth Mobility websites seem to reference any materials that discuss the legislature’s anticipation of how successful the Charge Ahead Rebate program would be in working to encourage low and moderate income drivers to exchange 20-year-old clunker cars with new plug-in cars and BEVs, considering the high purchase price of new electric vehicles.

I noted this from an article about our Oregon efforts in a July 7, 2107, Green Car Reports:


...Beyond that suite of rebates, an additional "Charge Ahead" fund is dedicated to providing up to an additional $2,500 to incentivize low- and moderate-income drivers who replace (and scrap) a car that is at least 20 years old with an electric vehicle—new or used.

The "Charge Ahead" funds can be combined with the standard purchase rebate to provide up to $5,000 off the cost of that new or used electric car, meaning used Nissan Leafs might now have an effective cost of less than $5,000 to qualifying drivers....


The Standard rebate is valid only for new vehicles, but the $2,500 Charge Ahead rebate may be enough to encourage a low or moderate income driver to junk a very old vehicle and replace it with a moderately priced used BEV.
 
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