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Hi there,
just wanted to get a sense from other Volt users what they're doing to optimize the EV range from their 2016 Volt.
I personally find myself shifting to L when driving in the city, and normal D with paddle usage when on the highway.
I'm not sure whether constantly shifting between L and D will have future consequences or not, but it would be nice to get some manufacturer input on this.
Also, we have a lot of hills here in CA, so I find myself switching to 'hold' quite often when going uphill. It seems to make sense to use gas for the heavy lifting without watching your miles drain quickly.
I also use cruise control often which seems to use pull energy more evenly vs. the constant accelerating/decelerating use of the pedal.
I often wonder if its even worth doing all these things...maybe it all balances out in the end, but these are some of the things I am trying.
Any else have any input?
 

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After driving a Prius for 13 yrs and a LEAF for over 5, I have decided that my quest for long EV range will mainly consist of not driving so fast. I normally drive in D and try to drive on surface streets rather than the freeway - so slower speeds but longer times to get to destination. Personally don't want to deal with shifting from D to L to D or hold mode. Besides if I gain EV miles by careful driving, my wife will mess up the statistics when she drives. I try to just enjoy the drive.
 

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Hi there,
just wanted to get a sense from other Volt users what they're doing to optimize the EV range from their 2016 Volt.
I personally find myself shifting to L when driving in the city, and normal D with paddle usage when on the highway.
I'm not sure whether constantly shifting between L and D will have future consequences or not, but it would be nice to get some manufacturer input on this.
Also, we have a lot of hills here in CA, so I find myself switching to 'hold' quite often when going uphill. It seems to make sense to use gas for the heavy lifting without watching your miles drain quickly.
I also use cruise control often which seems to use pull energy more evenly vs. the constant accelerating/decelerating use of the pedal.
I often wonder if its even worth doing all these things...maybe it all balances out in the end, but these are some of the things I am trying.
Any else have any input?
L, paddle, Hold mode.. do not do much of anything for optimizing energy consumption. The thing that really affects your energy consumption is the way you drive.

Driving smoothly with progressive acceleration and deceleration, and minimizing your speed is what will have the largest effect.

L or the paddles only change the comfort of your driving experience depending on your preference, but they won’t in themselves make any difference in driving efficiency.

Hold is mostly useful if you want to control when you are polluting. For example if you are going to drive beyond the battery range, you may want to use Hold mode on the highway, so that you have battery left for your driving in the City and avoid polluting there.

But an electric motor is always more efficient than a gas engine, so as long as you have some battery, your most efficient mode is to use it, not to use gas.
 

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I don't shift or drive in L unless slowing for a stop ahead. No jackrabbit starts or hot dogging goes a long way for mileage. When driving over 50 mph or highway driving, I use hold or mountain mode depending on the distance I'm traveling. Anything under 50 mph I use electricity only. The green ball indicator or the green ring is helpful if you pay attention and attempt to remain in the green. Good luck but most of all enjoy your new Volt, I love my second one more than Gen1...
 

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I often cruise along at 55 MPH on the freeway, especially when weather conditions or potential wildlife crossing dictate a slower speed for safety or my trip is so short that a few seconds of extra travel time are irrelevant and relaxing. I coast into exit ramps, stop signs, and red lights, often dropping into "L" for added drag, a little power regeneration, and less wear on the brakes.
 

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There are countless threads on D vs L, normal vs sport, etc.

In the end of the day - there is nothing physically different with the vehicle in any of those modes.
If you drive the same way, you will get the same result. The difference is how the pedals respond to you.

You need to keep the car moving as often as possible (avoid stopping or slowing if you don't need to) and keep a slow, steady pace for maximum range.
You can do this in D, you can do it in L, you can do it in Normal, you can do it in Sport, you can do it with or without using the regen paddles.

It all comes down to you controlling the vehicle in a consistent manner - pick the combination of tools to help you get there, but they're not magically going to make you more efficient.

Constantly changing modes will likely make you less efficient, as you are relying on the mode to do the work and not you. If you only ever use one set of drive conditions, you learn to master your control of it and can be most efficient all of the time in that one mode.
Every time you change, you need to adapt to that new mode, which is just going to throw you off.
 

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You are over-thinking the problem. I use Hold only on the freeway/open road and always with a light foot on the gas. I use L and paddle all the time, especially when, in the city, the signal changes at the last possible decision point and you decide to stop hard.
A gentle foot on gas in the city should yield 45-50 mpg. The new engine is pretty thrifty. What a great and fun car.
 

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Hi there,
just wanted to get a sense from other Volt users what they're doing to optimize the EV range from their 2016 Volt.
I personally find myself shifting to L when driving in the city, and normal D with paddle usage when on the highway.
I'm not sure whether constantly shifting between L and D will have future consequences or not, but it would be nice to get some manufacturer input on this.
Also, we have a lot of hills here in CA, so I find myself switching to 'hold' quite often when going uphill. It seems to make sense to use gas for the heavy lifting without watching your miles drain quickly.
I also use cruise control often which seems to use pull energy more evenly vs. the constant accelerating/decelerating use of the pedal.
I often wonder if its even worth doing all these things...maybe it all balances out in the end, but these are some of the things I am trying.
Any else have any input?
As noted by another on reply to your question... I am also a former Prius and Leaf Owner. Have had my 2017 Volt since March. Great fricking car, but I don't try to overthink it, it's way smarter than me.

Things I do though: I will drive streets instead of highway here (but here in Omaha, we don't have traffic - so driving streets is the norm anyway.

But just drive normal and enjoy the car, its a great ride.

and I'm getting pretty consistent 71 miles on a full charge, and that just by sensible driving - nothing extreme.
 

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As a former mid-westerner, when I really care about AER I just pretend I am driving on snow. Keep it in D and gradually speed up, coast (keeping the KW used around 0), or gradually slow down as traffic permits. It is a lot easier to make gradual changes or coast in D than L. Also stay off the freeways. Set your Nav/waze/whatever to ignore freeways when finding the best path to your destination. That said, my round trips are usually short enough that I really don't care about AER. L and the paddle are really handy for maximizing one-pedal driving when bopping around on surface streets and in heavy traffic.
 

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Regen has a lot to do with my success. Everyday I'm driving 105km with 3-7km left on the guess-o-meter on a single charge. My record so far is 112.1km. I have experimented with only keeping the car in "D" which didn't get me home on a single charge, and have now adopted using all three regens from "D" to "L" to "paddle" which results in hardly using foundation brakes coming to every stop. Think about it, coasting in "D" at 75KM only shows about 7KW going back into the battery. When I know that I can't stop in "D" I downshift into "L" which now puts about 25KW back into the battery and when I can't come to a stop in "L" I use the paddle which can show up to 40+KW back into the battery. So why waste all my potential regen power keeping it in "D" making only 7KW. And yes, I keep my car at 95km on the highway to conserve the battery.
 

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Hi there,
...
Also, we have a lot of hills here in CA, so I find myself switching to 'hold' quite often when going uphill. It seems to make sense to use gas for the heavy lifting without watching your miles drain quickly.
...
This doesn't work. I tried it on a 62 mile loop in SD Co on interstate 15 where there is a lot of elevation change. Using the battery up and then finishing the trip on gas- .3 gallons used. The second attempt using the hold mode for the uphill sections and some higher speed interstate running- .3 gallons used in half the distance (22 mpg instead of 44 mpg). The battery lasted about 1 mile beyond my destination. Basically you can use the gas engine for the hard sections, but the net range is about the same if you test on the same stretch of road. All you do is trade for one source of energy for the other. Either way the higher speeds and hills take a certain amount of energy.
 

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... So why waste all my potential regen power keeping it in "D" making only 7KW. And yes, I keep my car at 95km on the highway to conserve the battery.
The higher current going back into the battery would theoretically have more electrical losses as heat lost compared to a few kw regen during coasting events. Of course it is far better to paddle regen quickly rather than be 'that guy in the slow lane' hypermiling and get the finger.
 

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After driving a Prius for 13 yrs and a LEAF for over 5, I have decided that my quest for long EV range will mainly consist of not driving so fast. I normally drive in D and try to drive on surface streets rather than the freeway - so slower speeds but longer times to get to destination. Personally don't want to deal with shifting from D to L to D or hold mode. Besides if I gain EV miles by careful driving, my wife will mess up the statistics when she drives. I try to just enjoy the drive.
AMEN to this approach. As a another former Prius driver, and current Leaf/Volt driver, this is my approach. Enjoy the drive, take in the city scenery, avoid the highways and experience life rather than racing to get to it. Cheers.
 

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Regen always reduces range, far better to do a pure coast as much as possible, low speeds combined with coasting to a stop result in the longest ranges. I'm not certain but I have a feeling my 68.x mile round trip EV ranges (on a 2013 G1) beat out most here.

This doesn't work. I tried it on a 62 mile loop in SD Co on interstate 15 where there is a lot of elevation change. Using the battery up and then finishing the trip on gas- .3 gallons used. The second attempt using the hold mode for the uphill sections and some higher speed interstate running- .3 gallons used in half the distance (22 mpg instead of 44 mpg).

Either way the higher speeds and hills take a certain amount of energy.
Actually things aren't as simple as that, once your motor is hot using it only on uphill sections combined with DWL has a definite fuel economy effect over long trips.

Just turning the motor on and off without modifying behavior has no appreciable affect.
 

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Just turning the motor on and off without modifying behavior has no appreciable affect.
Yes, this is correct. Just using the ICE for difficult sections of road doesn't gain anything. Using it over a longer distance to give it a chance to warm up properly and saving the EV mode for 50 mph or less roads might net you more range on less energy consumed. Going 60 mph instead of 70 mph will save you no matter what the mode of propulsion. In my case I try to use up the battery as much as possible because I'm getting lots of power from solar so this helps make the break-even financial cost occur sooner for me.

In my example I didn't change anything except where I used hold mode--- same 65 to 70 mph on the interstate and same exact route. I have since taken the car on a longer trip almost entirely on gas (hold mode). It acts like any other gas car where slower driving and hypermiling techniques give you better mileage. The one nice thing was the car had plenty of poke to pass uphill at elevation with the electric torque kicking in when you needed it. Over all, the car was still a bit behind my old TDI in highway economy, but I didn't buy the Volt for the highway, but for my 35-40 mi daily grind in town.
 

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For me, not driving so damn fast is the biggest saver. I only switch to L if I'm in serious stop-and-go traffic, or when going down a steep curvy hill that is 20mph and has a stop sign at the bottom (daily commute). Otherwise, doing what I can to keep my momentum going is the big saver, as well as not blasting AC. I can see my EV miles drain faster when the AC comes on.
 

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L, paddle, Hold mode.. do not do much of anything for optimizing energy consumption.
That is not true, I've tested this now 3 times since I just purchased the vehicle and it has worked each time. I get 7-10km MORE in L mode than I do with D mode per charge and it is the exact same route I take each day to work and back and I tested in the same driving pattern so no sport mode & no fast acceleration to be fair in all my tests.
 
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