GM Volt Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm looking for some help regarding code in Ontario.

Although I have a Chevy Volt that I charge on a regular 120V outlet right now, I'm looking to install a 240V outlet in the garage and use the charger that came with the car for faster charging.

I plan on running 6 AWG cable from the electric panel in the basement to the garage and use NEMA 14-50 connector. I would like to confirm:

1) Can I use 60AMP breaker or must I use a 50AMP?
2) Is there specific recommendation for feeding the #6 wire through to the garage through the plywood? I.e. any specific insulators that I have to use?
3) Is there specific code about distance between outlets, or height of outlet? I plan to install it about 5 ft from the ground in an external box.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,855 Posts
Hi, I'm looking for some help regarding code in Ontario.

Although I have a Chevy Volt that I charge on a regular 120V outlet right now, I'm looking to install a 240V outlet in the garage and use the charger that came with the car for faster charging.

I plan on running 6 AWG cable from the electric panel in the basement to the garage and use NEMA 14-50 connector. I would like to confirm:

1) Can I use 60AMP breaker or must I use a 50AMP?
2) Is there specific recommendation for feeding the #6 wire through to the garage through the plywood? I.e. any specific insulators that I have to use?
3) Is there specific code about distance between outlets, or height of outlet? I plan to install it about 5 ft from the ground in an external box.
Not an electrician here but:

1) No. (Why would you install a 60 amp breaker with a receptacle (14-50) that is only rated for 50 amps? Do you plan on charging more than 1 vehicle at a time? Maybe what you need is a 100 amp subpanel and 2 40 amp circuits?)

2) What is the total distance for the circuit you plan to install, that will help determine the wire gauge. Maybe #8 gauge would be sufficient but consult an electrician. Are you running the wire through an attic, basement or inside any interior walls? One option that may meet your needs is armored cable (metal wrapped, flexible.)

3) If an outlet or switch is installed inside a garage it may be required to be a minimum of 48 inches above the floor. This is to ensure that gasoline vapors would not be ignited by a spark at the outlet or switch. A local electrician would know if this applies. If outside, the external box would need to be all weather rated, not sure about the height.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
If you are just looking at doing the hack to convert your factory charger that came with the Volt to work on 220 Volts, you would not need anything more than 12 gauge cable and a 2 pole 20 amp breaker. Could probably use #14/2 with a 2 pole 15 Amp breaker. I have yet to do my charger and figure I'll just use a standard 15/20 duplex receptacle and spray it red OR use a Hospital Grade receptacle .

If you are doing this for a future higher power charger then you would use a lower gauge wire like #10, #8 or if a long run, #6 to negate voltage drop in the cable at high amperage.

It really depends on where you are running the cable. If exposed and on the surface, BX (Armoured Sheath) Cable would be the easiest. If you are wanting to use #8 such as range cable or #6 there are three possible ways of doing it. The idea is to protect the cable.
1. Use Armoured Cable (BX).
2. Use EMT but that will be tricky if you don't have a pipe bender,
3. or use plastic PVC pipe and run the cable inside it. I am not sure on exterior plugs but I would guess it would be required to be on a "GFCI" circuit so at that high amperage, it will be expensive.

If in doubt, hire an electrician.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,431 Posts
Instead of 12/2 , use 12/3 or 10/3 because the EVSE needs a ground. And instead of EMT or PVC, use plastic electrical conduit which has prefabricated elbows,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,033 Posts
Not sure how Ontario differs from BC but I installed a 60 amp breaker in my main 200 amp panel and ran #8 wire (I think it was, whatever the codebook said) to a subpanel in the garage. I use regular Nomex through the floor to the main beam in the garage below. I installed a 30 amp 240V outlet (for wall oven, paint baking), 20 amp 240V for air compressor (now shared for L2 charging), a 20 amp 120V for welder and misc., and four 15 amp 120V lines going back into house. The garage circuits are below the panel a couple feet above the floor so have to be shielded whereas the 4 lines running back into the panel go above the panel and along the main beam so are Nomex. Off hand I think the dividing line for shielded/Nomex is 48" which is where the panel is.You need a permit and a code book. Any thing not covered by code book you can ask the electrical inspectors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
212 Posts
Instead of 12/2 , use 12/3 or 10/3 because the EVSE needs a ground. And instead of EMT or PVC, use plastic electrical conduit which has prefabricated elbows,
Don't know about PR but in Canada 12/2 or 10/2 has a ground and 2 conductors. As for PVC that is what you refer to as plastic electrical conduit. It really depends on what outcome is desired. Hope all is good in your part of PR ;)

I got thinking about my earlier reply and it needs to be 12/2 or better 10/2. The hacked charger draws 12.8 Amps from what I have read and 14/2 is only legal for 12 Amps (80%) on a 15 Amp breaker in Canada, so 12/2 on a 20 amp breaker would be within code. That (20 A) would be a typical circuit in the USA AFIK. Been retired from doing electrical for 20 years so I don't remember the code so well any more!
Added: 60 Amp would be #6
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,782 Posts
When going through a hole in a wall, conduit is needed. Either plastic or metal. In this case where there is a distance and some question about protecting the run, I would do a sub-panel in the garage using #6 in conduit. Then run appropriate sub-panel breaker, cable and outlet for the application.

Instead of 12/2 , use 12/3 or 10/3 because the EVSE needs a ground. And instead of EMT or PVC, use plastic electrical conduit which has prefabricated elbows,
12/2 has a ground. 12/3 has two hots, neutral and ground.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top