GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,439 Posts
To make it worse, they are talking about just 250 locations. This sounds extravagant to me, even as an EV driver and advocate.

However, they are talking about DCFC in some cases, which are more expensive. Electrical service has to be upgraded, etc. And for all we know, some of these locations might be complete plazas where they buy the land, add a paved surface, lighting and access driveways, etc. So the scope might be more like building an entire gas station (to use that as an analogy) rather then just one gas pump. If that is the case, and if these are sited along major freeways, then this could really be a legitimate investment in the kind of infrastructure we will need to be moving toward as a society.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,192 Posts
A large portion of these are for 50KW DCFC stations. These will require power feeds that are three phase 200A service (not cheap).

Depending on infrastructure these units can cost between $60K to $100K per installation. Also the $20 million also allocates funding for servicing and maintenance over the life of the charging infrastructure. So the number makes sense and it actually seems very well thought out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Let's wait and see what we are actually getting. As Neromanceres says, this could actually be a reasonable number.

I can't see how I will personally benefit from this, but if it does promote what it professes to, then it could turn out to be a very good thing. Besides, $20 million would hardly cover painting the lines on Ontario highways; it is not much in the grand scheme.

And never take too much from 680 News.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,192 Posts
I've seen the proposals to the Ontario government for the Region of Waterloo and Oxford County. Plus I've also heard that the enRoute stations have applied for DCFC's under this program as well.

These are supposed to be a mix of DCFC's and L2 AC charging infrastructure. Oxford County and the Region of Waterloo are each applying for about 4 DCFC stations and about 12 L2 AC stations under the program.

Oxford county proposal starts at page 95:
http://www.oxfordcounty.ca/portals/15/Documents/News Room/5386_0_Feb_10_2016_Agenda_version01.pdf#page=95

http://www.woodstocksentinelreview.com/2016/02/10/oxford-county-council-approved-an-application-for-16-new-electric-vehicle-charging-stations-under-a-20-million-program-from-the-province
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
In my opinion the most efficient way to accelerate EV acceptance at this point in time is to get as many daily commuters as possible of the ICE cars. The best way to do this would be to install as many as possible charging points (110V outlets or inexpensive L2 stations) in public parking garages in business areas of the major cities. It does not require full government involvement since in many cases businesses could participate when reasonable initiative is provided.
Spending $20 million dollars on setting up 500 charging points to me sounds like a huge waste of money.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,192 Posts
In my opinion the most efficient way to accelerate EV acceptance at this point in time is to get as many daily commuters as possible of the ICE cars. The best way to do this would be to install as many as possible charging points (110V outlets or inexpensive L2 stations) in public parking garages in business areas of the major cities. It does not require full government involvement since in many cases businesses could participate when reasonable initiative is provided.
Spending $20 million dollars on setting up 500 charging points to me sounds like a huge waste of money.
I disagree. This $20 Million will go towards setting up 213 DCFC stations in Ontario. This will make it possible to have a vehicle like the Bolt EV or second generation Leaf as your only car for many people in Ontario.

Without these DCFC stations I would never consider a pure BEV as an only vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
63 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I disagree. This $20 Million will go towards setting up 213 DCFC stations in Ontario. This will make it possible to have a vehicle like the Bolt EV or second generation Leaf as your only car for many people in Ontario.

Without these DCFC stations I would never consider a pure BEV as an only vehicle.
Well, I do not think I would consider BEV as the only personal vehicle in a forceable future. I'm sticking to my Volt for a long time ahead and may only change to the newer Volt if I have to. Volt provides me amazing flexibility of doing my daily commute in EV mode while allowing me to drive wherever and whenever I want without thinking of whether I will make it there or will have charging station on the way with enough time to sit a wait for it to charge up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,464 Posts
Well, I do not think I would consider BEV as the only personal vehicle in a forceable future.
You guys are in Canada, so it's a bit different. But for me, the Bolt will definitely be my only vehicle. Well, I'll have other vehicles, but they won't be available to me (being 500 miles away and whatnot).

Anyway, this proposal seems fine to me. Heck, it cost my company $20,000 per L2 charger that they installed, so these L3 chargers seem like a bargain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,439 Posts
In my opinion the most efficient way to accelerate EV acceptance at this point in time is to get as many daily commuters as possible of the ICE cars. The best way to do this would be to install as many as possible charging points (110V outlets or inexpensive L2 stations) in public parking garages in business areas of the major cities....
I agree with your point about focusing on the commuter as the low hanging fruit. Different opinion on the best way to get them: I think the easiest use case for EV adoption is a commuter who can make the round trip using only overnight charging at home. And they have more than one vehicle in the household, so long trips are not an issue. This takes the expensive public chargers out of the equation for now. With the upcoming new 200 mile EV models, this could describe a huge market segment.

To get these people driving electric, all they need is to buy an EV and install a Level 2 station at home. Home charging installations can often be done for much less money than we are seeing for public charging stations.

Supporting private EV and L2 purchases through tax breaks and grants seems to me to be the best use of public money at this stage.

Once all of these “easy” people are in EVs, then there will be such a huge fleet of EVs on the road, the build out of the public charging infrastructure will be essentially inevitable due to the obvious market for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
Just for perspective, Ontario is spending $81 million to add 6 lanes (there are 6 or 8 existing lanes) to 4 km. of the 401 in Mississauga. So this charging initiative is costing about the same as 1 of those kilometres.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,472 Posts
There is one a few blocks from my home but as of a week ago isn't turned on yet. No rate structure posted...
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
2,356 Posts
Rates are set by the station owner and they vary. The one near me is 30 cents per minute. Check Plugshare.com for details on each station.

Note that there are many that still need to be installed and aren't shown.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,464 Posts
You guys are in Canada, so it's a bit different. But for me, the Bolt will definitely be my only vehicle. Well, I'll have other vehicles, but they won't be available to me (being 500 miles away and whatnot).
Ha! Who is this rube that thinks a Bolt could be his only vehicle?
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top