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I just got a Volt. I'm curious to know how well the batteries are holding up on older Volts? Have you seen a significant decrease in range at 2 years, 3, 4?
 

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My Volt is nearing 4 years old at this point. I only have bout 42k miles, but I have seen zero change in battery capacity.

There are about 27 cars listed on Voltstats (http://www.voltstats.net/) with over 100k miles on them, including one with over 300k miles. Not one person has ever complained about a loss of battery capacity.
 

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Our 2011 is performing exactly as it did when it first arrived, but it has only gone about 35,000 miles so far.
 

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For the 2011 MY Volt we may have lost a couple of miles of range or it may just be the drive cycles or estimated display. A couple of weeks ago I went to the airport and ended up with 42 miles of range. I think that's pretty much smack on what I got in the first year of having the Volt but I may be a more efficient driver now. So overall hard to tell.

In any event battery degradation doesn't appear to be an issue at all.
 

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My wife's 2012 has over 75,000 miles on it. No noticeable degradation in charging or range (Perhaps 0.1 kWH). We bought it in October of 2011.
 

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Look, my car is only six months old, but respectfully I believe the question misses the mark slightly: the battery is a little over 18 kWh, but only 14 of that is usable on a daily basis. The packs are thermally controlled to ensure longevity, but even if they do degrade over time, such that say the total capacity of the battery was only 17 or even 16 or 15 kWh, you still get your 14 kWh for your 53 miles... Do I have that right, fam?

All that said, now that the weather's warmed up, after my 20+ mile commute in to work today, my remaining range was: 53 miles.

Enjoy that new Volt!!!
 

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My 2013 just over 3 years with 79k miles is the same as new. I was getting over 50 miles in the nice weather the first 2 years but my commute changed and it is 1/2 highway and now get 44-46 daily on battery and 13-15 on .30 to .36 gal in the warm months. Coldest month I can still get 39 battery and have to use 1/2 gal on my commute
 

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32 months and 24K miles and ZERO loss of range/capacity. But I wouldn't expect any because of how GM designed and engineered the Volt. Unlike a BEV that may need to allow a user to use 90 to 95% of the battery to get that range, the Volt keeps about 6 kw in reserve. That buffer will protect the Volt for a LONG LONG time. I'd be willing to bet a decade from now Gen 1 Volt owners will still be getting 38 miles per charge and Gen II will be getting 53 miles.

GM over engineered the Volt. They did it right.
 

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Both of ours still have roughly the same estimated range they had when we bought them. Lots of other factors contribute to range; driving style, outside temperature, cabin temperature, tires and inflation, etc., so I can't say the range has changed in any discernible way due to battery degradation. We always keep ours plugged in when home. My wife's is set to immediate charge, so it gets lots of small (<10 mile) charging.

Considering ours are now over 5 years old, with 41K (36K EV) miles on one, and 32K (27K EV) miles on the other, I'm pleased.
 

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I have a 2011 with 120k miles on it. Now that it's warmed up here in Michigan, the range is back up to the mid 30's... in other words, no loss of battery life...
 

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I just got a Volt. I'm curious to know how well the batteries are holding up on older Volts? Have you seen a significant decrease in range at 2 years, 3, 4?
There is so much buffer built into the programming, leaving some 6kw untapped even if there is capacity fall off from the owners point of view we'd likely never see it because you cannot fully charge nor discharge the Volts traction battery. Capacity loss is much more an issue in BEV's that utilize the battery capacity much more aggressively.
 

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My 2015 has 24k and no issues, have driven almost all electric and have only used 3.7 gallons of fuel so far. I get around 44 miles per charge with mixed driving on freeways and side roads. As a tech, have not seen any battery issues other then the TM system.
 

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Look, my car is only six months old, but respectfully I believe the question misses the mark slightly: the battery is a little over 18 kWh, but only 14 of that is usable on a daily basis. The packs are thermally controlled to ensure longevity, but even if they do degrade over time, such that say the total capacity of the battery was only 17 or even 16 or 15 kWh, you still get your 14 kWh for your 53 miles... Do I have that right, fam?

All that said, now that the weather's warmed up, after my 20+ mile commute in to work today, my remaining range was: 53 miles.

Enjoy that new Volt!!!
Yes that's basically correct. The driver doesn't necessarily notice any performance change when the degradation is low enough to get buried in the unused capacity. I think it was a good engineering decision.
 

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My answer is a little bit complicated but the summary is that I have noticed no degradation of the battery.

Back in December I bought a used 2013 with low mileage. It was a corporate lease and had been run 80%+ on the REX so the battery hadn't had much of a workout.

Since then I've put just a whisker under 17,000 miles (90% electric) on it mostly commuting back and forth to work which is about 40 miles each way (80 miles total). This means that I fully charge and discharge my available pack (39-40 mile capacity) twice a day so it's getting a significant workout.

The battery range has remained very consistent (allowing for weather/temperatures) and the only real change I've noticed is that if I "floor it" the power meter now peaks out at 108kw where it used to peak at 111kw
 

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97,000 EV miles on my Volt and just yesterday I had 50 miles on a full charge. No range degradation so far in 4.5 years.

 

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Thanks, that's comforting news, it's also surprising given the experience of cell phones.
This is probably the biggest misconception that most people have about electric cars. Everyone gripes about rechargeable batteries in consumer equipment and so it's quite natural to project those same misgivings onto the batteries in electric vehicles. But the EV industry has designed their batteries, charging and power control systems to really baby the batteries so that they'll hold up far, far longer than your typical camera or laptop battery, and do so without loosing very much capacity. They have to do that because they need to offer long battery warranties to allay those negative vibes that the public has.

So EVs never fully charge nor fully discharge their batteries - when the car tells you the battery is "full" it's really only at something like 80 or 90% of its true capacity. Similarly when the car says the battery is "empty" it really has 10 to 20% of its actual charge left. This goes a long way towards increasing longevity because fully charging and fully discharging a battery is hard on it.

In addition to that, many vehicles like the Volt actively heat or cool the battery pack to keep it operating in it's optimum temperature range. That's especially important when charging, which can generate a significant amount of heat. Keeping the battery cool while charging avoids one of the other major stresses that batteries have to endure.

I've often wished my SmartPhone had a "keep battery within a smaller charge window" option so I wouldn't have to buy new batteries every few years.
 
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