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After three years and at 35% oil life remaining I got tired of Carfax nagging me about the oil life and had the oil changed when I had my tire store rotate my tires. The oil was changed at the last scheduled dealer service as part of my 12-month warranty.

When I picked the car up he showed me the drain plug. My first though was "what's keeping the oil in if that thing is in his hand??" but the owner explained. He said they had a very hard time getting the plug out and it had stripped the threads coming out. He said they had to use a special rubber plug since they had tries an after-market replacement plug that did not work. He said that they could not repair this as the "replace the oil pan" solution required the engine to be lifted.

Has anyone else had issues with their oil plug? I love the car (and I never thought I would like another Chevy having owned a'83 Chevette). I did decide I hate Chevy dealers though.

Thanks in advance,
Hugh
 

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After three years and at 35% oil life remaining I got tired of Carfax nagging me about the oil life and had the oil changed when I had my tire store rotate my tires. The oil was changed at the last scheduled dealer service as part of my 12-month warranty.

When I picked the car up he showed me the drain plug. My first though was "what's keeping the oil in if that thing is in his hand??" but the owner explained. He said they had a very hard time getting the plug out and it had stripped the threads coming out. He said they had to use a special rubber plug since they had tries an after-market replacement plug that did not work. He said that they could not repair this as the "replace the oil pan" solution required the engine to be lifted.

Has anyone else had issues with their oil plug? I love the car (and I never thought I would like another Chevy having owned a'83 Chevette). I did decide I hate Chevy dealers though.

Thanks in advance,
Hugh
If the threads on the oil pan are stripped, the guy did it when he reinstalled the drain plug, not when he removed it, which makes it his responsibility to fix.
 

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They stripped the pan, they change the pan.
 

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I had an issue with rounding the hex head of the drain plug in removal. The plug I removed looked to be cast metal and the replacement purchased from my local auto parts store appeared to be a better quality forging. The specified installation torque seemed to be too high in my book, so I tightened to a comfortable level (1 grunt) and had no issues. At the next oil change I had no issues removing the plug.

If the threads were indeed stripped, then it may have been the previous tech over torquing the plug on installation. Just my thoughts.
 

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The plug takes 10 lb ft of torque.
 

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The plug takes 10 lb ft of torque.
That may be the spec, but I would be surprised if a tech gets out a torque wrench to install the plug. Nor do I expect that the tech would tighten the plug with a hand wrench. Flat rate jobs usually don't get done with care but rather get done the fastest way possible with power tools.
 

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When I bought the car in 2017, I was the first private party registered owner. The car had been titled in MI as a "Manufacturer's Vehicle" - the build data showed it as a special events car. Destinations stored in the nav were all various GM sites (and one fancy restaurant.) Looking at the mint condition, history of the car, and the service records I assume it was maintained by either some factory techs or maybe a Detroit area dealership.

When I did my first oil change on the car I found that the filter was so tight that the filter wrench would only dent the filter and slip. I had encountered tight filters before, but this one was bad enough that I figured I would have to destroy the filter to remove it, But after wrapping the filter in sandpaper strips and using a plumbing strap wrench I was finally able to break it free. And I can assure you that the pan drain plug had been tightened to more than 10 ft-lb! Ya gotta love those factory trained mechanics.
 

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Drain plugs are typically made of softer metal than the pan for this very purpose. They're intended to strip before the pan, so you don't have to replace the pan. I learned this on my '77 F-250. A $6 replacement plug from Autozone was all that was needed. As far as I know, they're still made that way. Head to the dealership, get a new plug, replace the rubber plug that hopefully didn't fall out and destroy your motor, and find a new place to get your oil changed. Yikes. One more reason you should learn to do your own work. It's an incredibly easy job.
 

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Tighten by finger, then use a short handle wrench, either open or box end, and grip the wrench up close to the action end. Tighten as hard as you can. Done. Many torque wrenches are not well calibrated to do a 10 lb/ft accurately. I wouldn't trust a torque wrench. The plug doesn't hold anything down, it just closes the hole. For awhile after changing your oil, take a look under the car to make sure the plug is staying put. Should use a new o-ring.
 

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The oil drain plug uses an O-ring. It doesn't take much torque to seal an O-ring--10 ft/lbs should be more than enough. Most mechanics are used to crush washers that require more torque to seal.
 
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