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Turbine engines have been around a long time, the military has been phasing them out for more efficient diesels. However, the idea of a hybrid electric version is interesting, as I believe that their weak point is idle or low speeds, where the electric could provide primary motivation. Excess power could be used to charge the battery.

Actually, Volvo had a hybrid power turbine engine car in 1992 : https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_ECC

Interesting to see how it pans out.

I love the name of the company.
 

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My first post was in reference to the Nikola One, the zero is also interesting. Looks like it won't be street legal?

Anyway, I love the idea of the 25 kw generator to charge it in the field, best off road vehicle type, electric reduces complexity and isn't sensitive to water. Looks like it is targeted to military and off roaders.
 

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320kWh battery wouldn't take too long to charge with a Supercharger (~3 hours tops). Too bad they don't have a way to charge those batteries without CNG. For them to build out a CNG infrastructure, doesn't make sense. This kind of vehicle should be L3 charging only which saves costs on not having onboard chargers. Also, save money by getting rid of the CNG turbine, generator, and CNG tanks. It would be really cool if it could have the option with maybe 450-550kWh battery and no CNG crap. That could give ~500 miles of driving a day with easy recharging at night. A "refill" would only be ~$60-80.
 

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320kWh battery wouldn't take too long to charge with a Supercharger (~3 hours tops). Too bad they don't have a way to charge those batteries without CNG. For them to build out a CNG infrastructure, doesn't make sense. This kind of vehicle should be L3 charging only which saves costs on not having onboard chargers. Also, save money by getting rid of the CNG turbine, generator, and CNG tanks. It would be really cool if it could have the option with maybe 450-550kWh battery and no CNG crap. That could give ~500 miles of driving a day with easy recharging at night. A "refill" would only be ~$60-80.
For the application they are looking at, a 320 kWh battery would only be about 100 to 150 miles of range, and a 500 kWh battery would still likely be less than 250 miles. Very few truckers would be willing to stop after four hours of driving for a two-hour refueling (even at the fastest Supercharger speeds). This is an application where EREV platforms are vastly superior to any of their pure BEV counterparts.
 

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For the application they are looking at, a 320 kWh battery would only be about 100 to 150 miles of range, and a 500 kWh battery would still likely be less than 250 miles. Very few truckers would be willing to stop after four hours of driving for a two-hour refueling (even at the fastest Supercharger speeds). This is an application where EREV platforms are vastly superior to any of their pure BEV counterparts.
I guess we'll have to wait until 1MWh batteries are easy to place in a rig ;)
 

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Actually we'll have to wait until they actually build one for real...since there appears to be no factory and all they've put up is Computer Generated Images...one wonders if their road tractor will be safety tested before sold...according to a study released by the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Administration. A property-damage-only rollover crash would cost $196,958, an injury rollover crash would cost $462,470, and a fatal rollover crash would cost $1.14 million.
 

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Sounds like it could work, but the devil is in the details. I wonder if they are using the Wrightspeed system?
 

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320kWh battery wouldn't take too long to charge with a Supercharger (~3 hours tops). Too bad they don't have a way to charge those batteries without CNG. For them to build out a CNG infrastructure, doesn't make sense. This kind of vehicle should be L3 charging only which saves costs on not having onboard chargers. Also, save money by getting rid of the CNG turbine, generator, and CNG tanks. It would be really cool if it could have the option with maybe 450-550kWh battery and no CNG crap. That could give ~500 miles of driving a day with easy recharging at night. A "refill" would only be ~$60-80.
Just as with a Tesla, a supercharger isn't really a solution that works for everyone as it is much too slow for quick cross country travel that the truck is clearly designed for. That option could work regionally, like recharge during your drop off, but this already has 320kwh of batteries with at most 100 mile loaded range, you would need like 10 tons of batteries to get 500 mile range. Given the legal weight limit of 40 tons you lose 25% of the trucks carrying capacity, which means costs more to operate, more trucks to move same load, this is bad.

The CNG isn't crap, it makes it a usable design. Other news sources mentioned that the truck can burn diesel as well, if so, that makes it more flexible where you fill up.

For electric freight moving, something like the hyperloop is the way to go.
 

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For the application they are looking at, a 320 kWh battery would only be about 100 to 150 miles of range, and a 500 kWh battery would still likely be less than 250 miles. Very few truckers would be willing to stop after four hours of driving for a two-hour refueling (even at the fastest Supercharger speeds). This is an application where EREV platforms are vastly superior to any of their pure BEV counterparts.
This is a hybrid with a gas turbine.
 

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I have wondered before how much energy (in KW) it would take to run the average long distance hauler on it's average day.
Using the aero rolling resistance tool at ecomodder, it looks like a Cd 0.7 80,000 lb vehicle with 115 sqft frontal area takes about 400 hp continuous to move 75 mph. This equates 300 kw, so fully loaded I imagine that truck would get 75 mile range. I imagine 150 miles is empty low speed range.

For an average 12 hour day, that is 3.6 MWh. This is like 30 hours a day on a supercharger. I sense an issue here...

This thing needs the fuel burning generator.
 

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This will never happen. Long-haul trucking is dependent on cheap fossil fuels - the price/benefit ratio of pure EV or EREV heavy trucks is too high. Railroads can haul almost 10x the cargo per unit energy. In the long-term, the railroads will electrify - they already run series-hybrid locomotives - and almost all long-haul freight will be via electrified rail. Short haul freight will probably used hybrid trucks with a lot of regen brake to improve mpg.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_efficiency_in_transportation
 

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This will never happen. Long-haul trucking is dependent on cheap fossil fuels - the price/benefit ratio of pure EV or EREV heavy trucks is too high. Railroads can haul almost 10x the cargo per unit energy. In the long-term, the railroads will electrify - they already run series-hybrid locomotives - and almost all long-haul freight will be via electrified rail. Short haul freight will probably used hybrid trucks with a lot of regen brake to improve mpg.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_efficiency_in_transportation
If it was all about economics there would be no long haul trucking industry and never would have been... Teamsters Union political power is why freight moves on Trucks via highway rather than rail at vastly lower cost and energy expenditure.

If Nikola Motors is anything other than vaporware then it is the future of trucking. I came up with the idea years ago and have always been made fun of even on sites like this dedicated to highly efficient green applications. A BEV semi would be viable for short haul trucking but for long haul you need a hybrid system.

The web site above it you bother to actually read it specifies that the trucks can be ordered with the gas turbine set up to run on CNG, Diesel fuel, or gasoline. If they wanted to, a gas turbine is fairly easy to configure as a flexible fuel unit capable of running on more than one fuel source. The more stringent emissions become on heavy tucks the faster something like this will become available... if the Teamsters Union falters in its political maneuverings much more stringent fuel economy and emissions standards will be placed on heavy duty trucks.

Keith
 

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I have wondered before how much energy (in KW) it would take to run the average long distance hauler on it's average day.
Steady state driving at freeway speeds requires 80-100 kW. Keep that up for 10 hours, and you're looking at 800 to 1,000 kWh.

This is a hybrid with a gas turbine.
Semantics. The Volt isn't the only model/definition for an EREV, and nothing says that an EREV must be able to plug into the wall. This one basically carries a generator with it. Now, if I called it a PHEV, that would be different. :)
 

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Steady state driving at freeway speeds requires 80-100 kW. Keep that up for 10 hours, and you're looking at 800 to 1,000 kWh.



Semantics. The Volt isn't the only model/definition for an EREV, and nothing says that an EREV must be able to plug into the wall. This one basically carries a generator with it. Now, if I called it a PHEV, that would be different. :)
This is a series hybrid, plain and simple. The difference between this and locomotives is the Nikola has a huge battery for energy storage and uses CNG. And yes, it would be really cool to simply allow the possibility to plug it in. Locos have huge power sinks for braking whereas the Nikola can do regen to the battery.
 

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The difference between this and locomotives is the Nikola has a huge battery for energy storage and uses CNG.
For reference, and related to the OP:

Nikola said:
The turbine is also fuel agnostic, allowing customers to order it in multiple versions: diesel, gasoline or clean burning natural gas.
 

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This is a series hybrid, plain and simple. The difference between this and locomotives is the Nikola has a huge battery for energy storage and uses CNG. And yes, it would be really cool to simply allow the possibility to plug it in. Locos have huge power sinks for braking whereas the Nikola can do regen to the battery.
I'm not sure how we got on the topic of locomotives. Regardless, if you want to look at the defining feature of a hybrid, it is that it can be powered directly by either the ICE or the electric motor. If you can show me where they say the CNG turbine can directly power the wheels, I will concede that it is a hybrid. Otherwise, I will stand my statement that it is an EREV, and they are using the on board CNG turbine as a power plant (rather than using the grid).

PS. For the record, diesel electric locomotives don't power the trucks directly from the diesel generator. Instead, the diesel generator sends power directly to large traction motors.
 

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I'm not sure how we got on the topic of locomotives. Regardless, if you want to look at the defining feature of a hybrid, it is that it can be powered directly by either the ICE or the electric motor. If you can show me where they say the CNG turbine can directly power the wheels, I will concede that it is a hybrid. Otherwise, I will stand my statement that it is an EREV.....
Series vs Parallel vs Series/Parallel Drivetrains

Volt as an EREV is a hybrid.

Gen 2 if I'm not mistaken is more often a Series/Parallel than Gen 1 is, which is to say that the gasoline engine is sometimes engaged through the transmission/drivetrain to the axles on either version.

Otherwise when running the gas engine to drive the generator, it is by definition a series hybrid. The Nikola is this too.
 

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Series vs Parallel vs Series/Parallel Drivetrains

Volt as an EREV is a hybrid.

Gen 2 if I'm not mistaken is more often a Series/Parallel than Gen 1 is, which is to say that the gasoline engine is sometimes engaged through the transmission/drivetrain to the axles on either version.

Otherwise when running the gas engine to drive the generator, it is by definition a series hybrid. The Nikola is this too.
I don't see anything about the CNG turbine being mechanically connected to the drive line. Maybe I'm missing something?
 
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