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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone!
If all goes well, I should be getting my 2013 by the end of the week. I am wondering if I "must" plug in the 110v charger in GFCI plug. I have a regular 3 prong to which I plug in a central vac and never have issues. Do you all think that will suffice? Or do I install a GFCI? I will never use both at the same time :)
 

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A couple of things, the 120V outlet needs to really be dedicated, unless you absolutely will never turn on the vac at the same time. Check the outlet to see if they used the push in holes, the long term draw at 12 amps can cause problems if wired that way, they really need to be connected to the screw terminals. And lastly you may want to replace the outlet itself with a high grade componet.

The ESEV has a GFCI built in AFAIK.

Edit: Personally I like the safety and convenience of a dedicated 240 charge station.

Oh and welcome to the club!
 

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Agree with Solar_dave

The 120V EVSE supplied with the car has built in ground fault protection. So a GFCI receptical is not a must.

The receptical used for charging your car should be on a dedicated circuit (a must for 12A charging) or you could trip circuit breakers. If the receptical used for your central vac is dedicated (no other recepticals/devices plugged in on the same circuit breaker) and you don't use the central vac while charging your car that could work.

To emphisize make sure the receptial is a good quality receptical with good connections.
 

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The Central Vac outlet should be a dedicated circuit, and is usually a 20 amp one. (I know, I have installed Central Vacs for over fifty years.)

So, it should be the best possible outlet in your garage to use for charging.

However, if it is a single outlet, rather than a duplex one, constant plugging and unplugging will loosen and weaken the contacts in the receptacle, so then it would be wise to change it to a duplex one, just make sure you get a 20 amp one, which will have the screw terminals on the back for better connections. and make sure it is mounted so the layout of the prongs matches the ones on the end of your charger, so it can hang down without having to kink the cord.

And actually, you should not use a GFI receptacle for your charger, as it has GFI circuitry in it already.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
The Central Vac outlet should be a dedicated circuit, and is usually a 20 amp one. (I know, I have installed Central Vacs for over fifty years.)

So, it should be the best possible outlet in your garage to use for charging.

However, if it is a single outlet, rather than a duplex one, constant plugging and unplugging will loosen and weaken the contacts in the receptacle, so then it would be wise to change it to a duplex one, just make sure you get a 20 amp one, which will have the screw terminals on the back for better connections. and make sure it is mounted so the layout of the prongs matches the ones on the end of your charger, so it can hang down without having to kink the cord.

And actually, you should not use a GFI receptacle for your charger, as it has GFI circuitry in it already.
My circuit is a 15 amp and is shared with some outside lights, no appliances. It's an old outlet too which I can replace, but it sounds like I need an electrician to set me up with a 20 amp circuit. Do you concur? I apologize, but I knowledge on this is VERY limited.
 

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My circuit is a 15 amp and is shared with some outside lights. It's an old outlet too which I can replace, but it sounds like I need an electrician to set me up with a 20 amp circuit. Do you concur? I apologize, but I knowledge on this is VERY limited.
If your circuit is wired with 14 gage wire instead of 12 gage... I would have an electrician run you a new 20 amp circuit. It may work but with a shared lighting circuit on a 15 amp breaker... You are pushing your luck. (Unless you want to charge at the 8 amp rate.)
 

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The portable charger SHOULD protect you with it's internal GFCI. But I have seen posts here where the charger (even with the GFCI) caused a plug in the wall to melt. I would DEFINITELY consult with an electrician.

I'm assuming you can use some of the first year savings from your gasoline budget.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Turns out that I have a whole room wired to that same circuit. I completely forgot ab about that until now. So I will have to call an electrician to do this the right way.

Thank you all for your help!!
 

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But I have seen posts here where the charger (even with the GFCI) caused a plug in the wall to melt. I would DEFINITELY consult with an electrician.
The GFCI (Ground Fault Condition Interrupter) protects you from being zapped by electricity. It does nothing about an overloaded, faulty or inadequate circuit behind it. That's what a breaker is intended for. So an overmatched outlet or it's wiring would be the cause of a scorched or melted outlet or wiring, not the EVSE. A GFCI (where ever it might be) would not protect against a current to was too much for a cheap, worn, or inadequately wired outlet.

But I agree, either know what you are doing or call in an electrician.
 

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If you don't mind charging at the 8 amp setting, then it will probably be just fine. But if you want the 12 amp then you need a dedicated outlet. I saw some other people mentioning the back of the plug and making sure the wires are attached with the screw terminals. Well, the trouble is you never know which other plugs are daisy chained between that outlet and the main panel. So those may be wired using the push-in terminals. My main heating system failed a few years ago and while waiting on repairs we used a lot of small space-heaters in the house. Every day a different room would die and I'd have to pull all of the switches and sockets out and re-wire them because they used 14 gauge wire and pushed them into the back of the plugs and switches. The trouble was when the heater quit working, often it wasn't the receptacle that I had the heater plugged into that failed, often it was one further up the chain. What I'd usually find is the wire melted right out of the plug due to the poor connection.

Last year we added several rooms to the house and I wired them all myself. I used 12 gauge wire and used the screw terminals on everything. I also took the opportunity to upgrade the plugs in the garage. We charge the Leaf on 240V but usually the Volt is charged on 120V using a dedicated 15amp outlet I installed.
 

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You can always flip the breaker and see what doesn't run.

There are some simple devices that plug in a socket and you look for a indications at the breaker box with a second device.


I share my plug with 6 overhead head doors in a Condo so I only use 8 amps. I thought about using the Volts time to charge setting to block out the times people come and go to work.
 

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Turns out that I have a whole room wired to that same circuit. I completely forgot ab about that until now. So I will have to call an electrician to do this the right way....
Before you call, and pay for, an electrician, you should check your power company out for any EV charging deals. In Michigan two of the biggest both have programs that can get you $2500 towards a 220v charger, and installation.

If you do not have a program, and are hiring your own electrician, consider going 220v, or at least prepping for it while the other work is being done. I have had more than a few later evenings where I was not recharged in the morning on 110v 12amp.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Picked the car up yesterday! To be safe, charged on on the 8. Electrician is coming to run a dedicated outlet for me. Great idea on checking with the electric company on rebate programs.

Thank you all for your time and help!!
 
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