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Discussion Starter #1
https://www.wsj.com/articles/gm-bids-farewell-to-its-breakthrough-electric-car-1544356800

Based in part on solicited comments from our forum members.

I emailed back and forth with this writer about this article as he was writing it. Decent job but I think he missed a key advantage of the Volt— that until charging stations are everywhere and charging is fast, the Volt can get almost all of the daily driving done in the country without gas and still go cross country if need be with no planning.

Still worth reading.



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I dunno, I thought the writer spelled out pretty well how the Volt can switch to gas to keep you going. True did not say, "You don't need charging stations when traveling long distances" but the writer seemed a lot more educated than many of the people posting comments. Most of them have bought into the notion that we must burn coal to generate electricity, few other options. And other similar ignorance.

I think the subtlety and sophistication of the Volt's power supply and how the car gets cleaner as the power grid gets cleaner is one of those things that eludes many people. Of course the opposite is also true, eliminating coal plant pollution control requirements (recent Trump EPA news) can definitely make the Volt—among other things—dirtier.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I dunno, I thought the writer spelled out pretty well how the Volt can switch to gas to keep you going. True did not say, "You don't need charging stations when traveling long distances" but the writer seemed a lot more educated than many of the people posting comments. Most of them have bought into the notion that we must burn coal to generate electricity, few other options. And other similar ignorance.

I think the subtlety and sophistication of the Volt's power supply and how the car gets cleaner as the power grid gets cleaner is one of those things that eludes many people. Of course the opposite is also true, eliminating coal plant pollution control requirements (recent Trump EPA news) can definitely make the Volt—among other things—dirtier.
All true. He did a decent job, but why is it so hard for people to get the fundamental advantage of this design as an important transition vehicle to an all electric future? I feel as a Volt supporter (if not evangelist) that I’ve failed too. Whenever I get the chance to answer questions the person seems shocked by what it is able to do.


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GM has spent the last decade advertising their big, high profit SUVs and pickups. As a result, the Volt is an unknown to the American public. Of course it didn't sell well.
 

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Of course the opposite is also true, eliminating coal plant pollution control requirements (recent Trump EPA news) can definitely make the Volt—among other things—dirtier.
A bit of mischaracterization there. There are definitely parts of ACE to be highly critical of, but the word "eliminating" is disingenuous. Here's why:

EPA expands Clean Air Act loopholes for coal plants

It's a proposal. I don't find information saying it was implemented at EPA.gov.

Proposal: Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) Rule

AND, the Obama era Clean Power Plan never went into effect.

The rule would replace the 2015 Clean Power Plan, which was stayed by the U.S. Supreme Court and has never gone into effect.
EPA unveils Affordable Clean Energy proposal; coal applauds

And regarding the cleanliness of the EV, there's this: The Dirt on Clean Electric Cars

Not to mention what happens when a Volt is commuted outside of its battery range......

I put the odds of ACE going into effect next to CPP going into effect. It'll sit on the shelf while it's being litigated to death.
 

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I was getting the windows tinted on my new 2019 this week (I had a 2016 Volt before this one). The worker who had just installed the tint was asking me how I like the Volt and was asking me how it worked. I explained the full battery range of around 55 miles and the 9 gallon gas tank that gets you around 40-45 miles per gallon. Another customer who was listening says, "so what do you do on a road trip?" Oh course, I reiterated it has a 9 gallon gas tank and I said, "I just drive it like another other car. And it gets better gas mileage than most any car on the road."

For the life of me I cannot comprehend why people do not understand this car. No thanks to GM for their lack of advertising, but still when I explain it they just don't get it.
 

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Thanks for posting this. I had seen the article earlier today, but don't know how to get around the lack of subscription issue, so couldn't read more than the headline, until now.

I recall reading this quote back when the gen1 was reviewed by the WSJ early on. It's one of the things that hooked me, even though it took until one year ago to buy my first, and now probably only, Volt.
 

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Wall Street Journal columnist Dan Neil wrote in his October 2010 review of the Volt: “A bunch of Midwestern engineers in bad haircuts and cheap wristwatches just out-engineered every other car company on the planet.”
OK, I like reading that one I must admit.

Overall, the article is not good press for GM. This goes to my point again about timing. In a few years, this might have been irrelevant, but right now, it damages GM's already fragile reputation in this sector before it is been firmly established.
 

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Based on that article, GM is going back to their pre-bankruptcy thinking where they will only sell medium and large gas and diesel guzzling ICE vehicles in the US while moving all their EV production to China in order to sell EVs there. China requires vehicles sold in China be made in China.

The article also has an anti-GOP slant. The current EV tax credit was signed into Law during President Bush's final year in office. It didn't go into effect until President Obama's first year in office though.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Based on that article, GM is going back to their pre-bankruptcy thinking where they will only sell medium and large gas and diesel guzzling ICE vehicles in the US while moving all their EV production to China in order to sell EVs there. China requires vehicles sold in China be made in China.

The article also has an anti-GOP slant. The current EV tax credit was signed into Law during President Bush's final year in office. It didn't go into effect until President Obama's first year in office though.
I agree with your first point, but don’t see the second that way. I didn’t think the article had a political slant, just trying to make sense why a car so many love and that GM staked a lot on is now gone.


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Based on that article, GM is going back to their pre-bankruptcy thinking where they will only sell medium and large gas and diesel guzzling ICE vehicles in the US while moving all their EV production to China in order to sell EVs there. China requires vehicles sold in China be made in China.

The article also has an anti-GOP slant. The current EV tax credit was signed into Law during President Bush's final year in office. It didn't go into effect until President Obama's first year in office though.
Teslas are made in U.S. and sold in China. There is a hefty 25% import tax which is why Tesla is making plans to produce cars in Shanghai.
 

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Thanks for posting that link.
Welcome.

The article also has an anti-GOP slant.
More and more WSJ is that way. During the last administration it was the opposite. Maybe they're just bitchy, but in either case we cancelled our subscription last year.

Teslas are made in U.S. and sold in China. There is a hefty 25% import tax which is why Tesla is making plans to produce cars in Shanghai.
I wonder if he's gotten a waiver from having to work with SAIC and is being allowed to own all of the operation, or only half like GM does. I recall he was lobbying the White House on twitter to get the SAIC out of his way not long ago.
 

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...I wonder if he's gotten a waiver from having to work with SAIC and is being allowed to own all of the operation, or only half like GM does. I recall he was lobbying the White House on twitter to get the SAIC out of his way not long ago.
It may well end up being a joint relationship with state-owned SAIC Motors as is the case for GM and VW. Time will tell.
 

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It may well end up being a joint relationship with state-owned SAIC Motors as is the case for GM and VW. Time will tell.
I haven't heard anything definite yet, but it's clearly an important point of concern.

Perhaps it was discussed in Argentina, or Lighthizer intends to make it a part of the ongoing negotiations.

I've heard no support for changes in this regard from GM - in fact quite the opposite. I was disappointed.
 

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From all the chatter here, I guess that this article is not behind the WSJ paywall. If it is, here's a link not requiring a subscription. And they quoted me accurately!
 

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Another article on the cancellation :
“What we're finding is that consumers are…carrying around this engine and driving on full electricity,” said Shad Balch, Chevrolet spokesperson, in a recent interview at the L.A. Auto Show.

Drivers are also getting over range anxiety, he said. When GM launched the first-generation Volt, there was virtually no public charging infrastructure. Now there are upward of 23,000 public charging stations in the U.S. and Canada.

“The need to carry around a backup generator under the hood is just going away,” Balch said. “We’re seeing that as...our customers are leaving the Volt to get into the Bolt EV.”
What a spin doctor. :rolleyes:
 

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What public EV charging infrastructure? Outside the big coastal cities (Chicago counts with the Great Lakes) as soon as you leave the interstate you're lucky to find a charger. For those that never drive outside the 240 or so mile range of the Bolt - great, but for those of us who drive further then our recharging system is liquid 87 octane gasoline.

The Volt is a transitional vehicle, but until the recharging infrastructure is as widespread as gas stations and BEVs can be recharged in the same 10 to 15 minutes of an ICE powered vehicle they will remain a niche market. Until then, we need vehicles like the Volt.
 
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