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Just wanted to say thank you to the folks in this forum for your support and feedback over the past few months. I finally pulled the trigger on a 2018 Volt Lt in kinetic blue with the comfort and driver confidence package. Picking it up on Monday. Ended up getting the car for $9200 off MSRP with my 2008 Honda Accord trade in. Then there'st he $2500 from MA and $7500 from federal resulting in an overall $19,200 off MSRP. I thought that was pretty good.

To be honest though, I'm still a little nervous about the decision due to a few things...

- It's a Chevy. I don't have much experience with a GM vehicle. Typically I buy Hondas.
- Depreciation. I'm a little worried that in a few years if I decide to trade or sell, the car will be worth significantly less.
- Maintenance. Although less is supposedly required, I've read some horror stories on here and on other forums that make me a little concerned (like the car stopping in the middle of the highway)

I hope that once I actually own the car and I'm in it daily that I'll absolutely love the purchase! I'm sure I will based on everyone's enthusiasm for the vehicle on this forum. I know for sure I'll love the gas savings since I'll most likely very rarely ever use gas.

Thanks again! I'll let you know how I feel about the car after a week of owning it.
 

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Congratulations! Sounds like you got a lot of car for the money. I got my 2018 volt in April, and thought the same thing after reading some bad stories. But fortunately so far, I have not had any issues (phew!). Looking forward to your feedback in the coming weeks. :)
 

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<p>
... To be honest though, I'm still a little nervous about the decision due to a few things... - It's a Chevy. I don't have much experience with a GM vehicle. Typically I buy Hondas. - Depreciation. I'm a little worried that in a few years if I decide to trade or sell, the car will be worth significantly less. - Maintenance. Although less is supposedly required, I've read some horror stories on here and on other forums that make me a little concerned (like the car stopping in the middle of the highway)
Of the 12 cars we have owned over the years, the only non-GM cars were two Infinitis and we will NEVER buy a Japanese car again. Depreciation and maintenance were horrendous compared to our GM cars. We just sold a 10-year old Cadillac CTS (27,000 miles) and replaced it with a 2018 CTC. These two cars were flawless upon delivery, as was our 2017 Volt. Our only complaint is that Cadillac (GM) doesn't have an EV similar to the Volt (the CT6 EV is a tank). GM quality and reliability have improved significantly since our first Chevrolet. We love the Volt. In the just over two years we've had it we've only used 6 gallons of gas, used on trips exceeding the battery range. BTW if you didn't get adaptive cruise control, you'll be missing an incredible function that makes driving more safe and relaxing.</p>
 

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Congrats!!! You are in for a wonderful experience. Not only for the immediate efficiency, but for the "down the road" advantages. Longer periods between oil changes, longer brake pad life, driving past gas stations and just giggling, GREAT TORQUE and great handling. ACC is a super benefit as you will find out. The first cold drive is gonna make you love the heated steering wheel. Can't wait to hear your next review. Also, have had zero issues with my 2018, 21K miles in 10 months..
 

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Congrats on you new Volt. If this is your first hybrid / electric, I think you're gonna love it. Theres nothing like being propelled by a smooth, quiet electric motor. You'll hopefully try some efficient driving techniques and learn how to maximize range and MPG. Its A LOT of fun to exploit what this car can do. One pedal driving IS the Future !

Don't be nervous. I came from decades of Toyota reliability. I'm proud to be driving a Chevy. Support domestic products and Make American Great Again! I'm quite impressed with the whole Chevy Volt package, as for build quality its better than the Prius I drove for 11 years. I didn't realize what I was missing until I took the plunge.

As for reliability, the Volt has already proven itself to be a good design, and they keep making it better. Mine has been no problem.
I've driven American, Japanese, German, Korean and never had issues with any cars. I take care of them myself anyway. I've put a couple 100,000 miles on all my cars, some more.

Depreciation. Only way to control that is not buy new. All cars depreciate, and especially ones with a battery. Keep it, drive it and enjoy. With all the discounts, tax credits and a great trade-in you did well.

As for Maintenance, there's not much to do on the Volt, and what there is, is really easy. After the free maintenance , all it needs is oil and filter changes. Anyone can do the oil changes, and the air filters are DIY. Why pay good money for someone else to do something sooo simple. If you go back to the Dealer just tell them you want an oil change, Period. If you say 'service', they will service your wallet! You probably won't need brakes for well over 100,000 miles ! Wash, wax, Charge and enjoy !!!

Do you have a Level 2 charger ? If not, and you want one, don't get ripped off with a crazy installation. Level 2 EVSE's can be had for a couple hundred bucks now, and ** The install can be as little as $20.00 if its mounted near your electrical breaker panel. Or install a 240V outlet and use your included cord set with an adapter at 240V. The faster you can charge, the more electric use you get. Typically, ** Don't pay to charge away from home.** From an economic standpoint, it makes no sense. The high charging / minute rates and slow charge time of the Volt make gas a better choice.
 

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Congratulations on your 2018 LT! Our kinetic blue 2018 was purchased in November and has yet to see the dealer's service department. It's been flawless so far.

I had American cars when young, then switched to foreign cars from around 1990 -2011, mostly Japanese, like Honda and Mazda. Now I am back to American cars, in the form of two Chevys with no regrets. They really have improved a great deal.

Of course you don't have ACC on the LT but I wouldn't sweat it, even with the comments some have made. Before buying our Volt, we rented a Chrysler 300 for a week with ACC, used it, and have no regrets about buying a Premier without it. At least under the circumstances we drive, being in complete control all the time is fine with us.

As for safety, ACC is not perfect, and yet can lead to complacency in some drivers. For now, nothing beats a fully attentive and skilled driver for safety. Someday with autonomous vehicles, that will change, but I don't think we are there yet. Look at the Tesla crashes on Autopilot for example.

The drivers confidence package you have is great at providing additional information, while allowing you to stay in full control of the vehicle.

As equipped, your LT is IMHO, the best value in a new Volt. At least in climates where the Comfort Package is nice to have too.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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Don't pay to charge away from home.** From an economic standpoint, it makes no sense. The high charging / minute rates and slow charge time of the Volt make gas a better choice.
Depends on what his kw/h rate is where he lives. In Los Angeles, the kw/h charged by DWP is about the same as the rate my work charges on their Chargepoint. Instead of spending $ on installing a 240v outlet (I live on a hillside and my electrical box is over 50ft. away from my detached garage), i opted to charge at work. Costs me on average $2.75 per charge. This actually comes out to be about the same (actually a little less during the summer) as charging at home after you factor in the tax and everything the utility company imposes.
 

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Regarding depreciation, remember your LT cost you in the teens, so you are starting from a low base. Sometimes people like to start from sticker, a number they never paid and then assess depreciation based on that. You'll be fine is the bottom line here.
 

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Regarding depreciation, remember your LT cost you in the teens, so you are starting from a low base. Sometimes people like to start from sticker, a number they never paid and then assess depreciation based on that. You'll be fine is the bottom line here.
Fully agree with this. Most of the time the "off the lot - new" price that KBB and other vehicle value estimates take into account the federal rebate and based on your zip code when getting that data for trade in or private party value, also includes any state/local credits. Suddenly according to KBB and NADA that $35K car is $25K or less for it's baseline. You didn't "lose" $10K since you didn't ever pay it in the first place as that money went back to you although not perhaps directly to the loan but rather in tax credits. In your case since you also had additional credits and rebates toward the loan price, you actually ended up likely south of the $20K mark in what you will actually pay when taking into account all the money you get back from other sources, namely your tax liability for 2018. Definitely a good deal since it's unlikely you could find many used 2018's on a lot for what your actual cost is going to be.
 

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My 2017 LT has spoiled me to the extent that I cringe when I have to drive a typical clunk-box. I find even the best automatic transmissions annoying to drive now. And that's coming from a prior muscle car gearhead who used to put modified exhausts on my cars to make them louder. Now loud exhaust is just noise to me: gives me a nearly instant headache. I still like noise and speed at the dragstrip as I feel that's where it belongs: not in a car where you are trying to listen to music or have conversations with family or friends. It's for these reasons that I couldn't care less about depreciation: I'm keeping this one! :)

Mike
 

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Chevy's today are not the same Chevy's of decades ago. Infact the first new U.S. car I ever purchased, and I'm 67 years old, is a 2014 new Chevy Volt in Oct. 2013. Traded that in for our current Volt, a 2016 Premier we purchased new in July 2016. Currently approaching 46,000 miles on it and we are right now on vacation with it in northeastern Oregon at Wallowa Lake.

My wife and I plan on taking a ride down to the Snake River Canyon area, a ride in a wilderness area with miles of dirt roads, and no services for many, many, miles.

I would recommend if you plan on traveling in areas with no services, get a compact spare tire and jack kit, for just that little piece of mind that is well worth the $170.00 for the complete compact spare tire kit with jack etc.
 

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Chevy's today are not the same Chevy's of decades ago. Infact the first new U.S. car I ever purchased, and
I would recommend if you plan on traveling in areas with no services, get a compact spare tire and jack kit, for just that little piece of mind that is well worth the $170.00 for the complete compact spare tire kit with jack etc.
Where does the spare go? Just in the boot?
I was the space for the jack (empty). I also did not see a spare kit listed anywhere (yet).

Have fun!

Mark
 

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I had a two-door Camry (a Solara). Toyota's are known for quality. I traded it in on a 2013 Volt. One thing I noticed immediately was that I could feel the seam in the back plastic of the steering wheel, something that didn't happen with the Toyota. It's a little thing. A couple years ago I traded the 2013 in on a black 2016 Volt. I was shocked how much the 2013 depreciated. Anyway I'm very happy with my 2016 Volt. It seems very well built and the cabin is very comfortable and sensible. It's at least as good as a Toyota. There's one little problem: the inside plastic panel in the hatch doesn't fit tightly and creaks a little.
 

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There's one little problem: the inside plastic panel in the hatch doesn't fit tightly and creaks a little.
Have you tried turning the rubber bump stops that the hatch closes against? That often resolves noise issues from back there. The hatch needs to close firmly against those stops. They can be turned by hand.

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Where does the spare go? Just in the boot?
I was the space for the jack (empty). I also did not see a spare kit listed anywhere (yet).

Have fun!

Mark
I place the compact spare tire behind the drivers seat in a heavy duty black garbage bag.. Also the middle of the tire is where the tools are included and the jack is in the trunk area under the carpet. The tire behind the drivers seat is secure and I can move the seat as well. If the need is for passengers its quite easy to pickup the tire and place it in the back or just store it in the garage if driving locally.
 

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Add me to the list of positive comments! My 2017 Volt Premier has 16,000 miles on it and, other than one oil change has had no maintenance needs whatsoever. I, too, love the torque and nearly stealth noise generation while accelerating joyfully. BTW, putting the mode selector in Sport will yield copious levels of acceleration with appropriate squeal from the tires. The adaptive cruise control greatly reduces stress and fatigue on highway trips; and I no longer get angry when nitwits cut in front of me as I attempt to keep a safe following distance. The cruise control takes care of it all and I don't give a hoot any more. It will even take the car to a complete "look Ma, no feet" stop without my help (although I am always poised and ready in case of need). I love this car.
 

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Not blaming you for having more faith for Hondas. I've had only japanese car till I bought my 2018 volt 3 months ago. So far so good. Fingers crossed it will last for a long time. I had to do one TSB though, but it was a software adjustment for a module, and it was done in like 2 hrs and the issue didn't come up again after that. Gas savings are enormous with this car.
 

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You made a wise choice buying a Gen 2 Volt. What car can do what a Volt can today even a $100,000 Tesla can not compete.

Were up here in extreme Northeastern Oregon at Wallowa Lake, 4,400 above sea level on vacation, we left our home at sea level, with our 2016 Chevy Volt Premier with now over 46,000 miles. My wife and I enjoy the outdoors and during our vacation we have spent hours fishing, and enjoying the sights of the mountains, and Hells Canyon area by the Snake River on the border of Idaho. Climbing and dropping thousand of feet with the Volt on rural mountain roads was quite an expierence as well.

As I type this we are at our mountain cabin above the Wallowa Lake. We left with a full tank of gas, and a full charge of electricty and never charged or plugged in again.

Looking at the Volt dash it reads: 851.1 miles total, electric 54 miles on 14.5 KWH, and 797 miles on gas, 15.78 gal's used for 50.3 MPG.

Its hard to believe a 4,000 lb + loaded passenger can perform like this with such efficiency as well.

This is one trip for sure a Tesla could never have made.
 

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I place the compact spare tire behind the drivers seat in a heavy duty black garbage bag.. Also the middle of the tire is where the tools are included and the jack is in the trunk area under the carpet. The tire behind the drivers seat is secure and I can move the seat as well. If the need is for passengers its quite easy to pickup the tire and place it in the back or just store it in the garage if driving locally.
Did you just place the spare wheel just on the passenger seat or on the floor in front of the passenger seat? The latter sounds a bit safer, but really it needs to be bolted down. There are DIYs on how to do that in the trunk to safely hold the spare wheel with nuts and bolts.
 

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I place the spare tire directly behind the drivers seat with the bottom of the tire lying on the floor in an angled up right position. The only way the tire can be removed is to push the drivers seat forward other wise the tire can't move even during a crash.
 
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