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I picked up a 2018 Volt LT last night, and when I logged into Onstar this morning for the first time, it told me I had low pressure on my rear 2 tires. On my drive to work, the front two were 236 kPa, rear were 226 - I hope I can figure out how to change these to PSI, but the app says they should be 248. So all were low, two raised a warning. Temp was around 5 deg C (40F) this AM, but I'd have thought that when driving the pressures should be fine. When I went out and showed a coworker the car after it was cold, and started it, recorded pressures were 228 and 220.

My guess is the dealer screwed this up, but they blame temps for pressure being low, kind of like Patriots fans with footballs :p . So, wondering, what pressure do people inflate to? Do people in cold climates regularly see this alarm, even when driving?
 

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Yes, the dealer screwed up, and that is their standard excuse.

If you want PSI, you have to switch out of Metric units in your preferences, but then your displays will show something called 'miles'. It's easy to switch back and forth, but I can't tell you how for a Gen2. Similarly, I can't tell you what the pressure should be for your tires, I believe it is a bit less than the 38 PSI for Gen1, but there are thousands here who do know.
 

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Only way to change to psi is to change all the measurements to imperial, which means your speed will show mph and odometer will be in miles. I never really got used to the feel of a Kpa measurement but guess we have to go with it as 99%of the world is metric.

Yes 248 (36 psi) should be the cold tire temperature per GM although most Volt owners run a little higher. I run mine at about 38 psi. Note that at this time of year will wildly fluctuating temperatures the tire pressure will vary and you will have to adjust it for winter conditions. Max cold temperature on these tires is 41psi.

Many dealers and shops just automatically set tire pressure to about 32 psi, as this is what most cars run at. They never consider the load rating of the tires in question vs pressure, but rather the door sticker values. In the Volts case if they looked at the sticker it would tell them 36 psi.
 

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Yes, that is customary. Tire pressures are rarely set with any kind of accuracy in a factory or at a dealership, so you really have to look after that yourself. And yes, you have to add more in cold weather. Simply air them up and you will be fine. I recommend airing at least 10% over the recommended 248, which would be 273 or about 40 psi. Tire pressures should be set when the tires are cold. Definitely don't drive around with the indicator on. The low pressure is bad for the tires, and somewhat unsafe. And if you don't have anything more convenient to use, there is an air compressor under the trunk floor.
 

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You can change the units from metric to US by using the arrow keys on the steering wheel – right side. With the car on, push the left arrow to bring up the menu options on the left side for driver’s display. Use the down arrow to scroll down to the settings (gear) symbol and select with the center button. The first option is the display units. You can now use the arrow keys and center button to select the appropriate units.

Recommended tire pressures should be displayed by the label on the driver’s side doorjamb – 36 psi (250 kPa) for all tires.
 

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Both my daughter's truck and my ELR were showing low pressure this morning. It got down to nearly 50F last night!
 

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To give the dealer some credit, we did have quite a temp swing last few days.
My tires went from 262 (normal) a few days ago to 230ish this morning. I need to top them up or just switch to winters early.
 

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40 psi provides a firm ride and some sidewall protection...:)
 

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I picked up a 2018 Volt LT last night, and when I logged into Onstar this morning for the first time, it told me I had low pressure on my rear 2 tires. On my drive to work, the front two were 236 kPa, rear were 226 - I hope I can figure out how to change these to PSI, but the app says they should be 248. So all were low, two raised a warning. Temp was around 5 deg C (40F) this AM, but I'd have thought that when driving the pressures should be fine. When I went out and showed a coworker the car after it was cold, and started it, recorded pressures were 228 and 220.

My guess is the dealer screwed this up, but they blame temps for pressure being low, kind of like Patriots fans with footballs :p . So, wondering, what pressure do people inflate to? Do people in cold climates regularly see this alarm, even when driving?
My new 2018 Volt LT was delivered to me three weeks ago with tire pressure of 268-280 kPa. It does vary a bit depending on outside temps, and that is higher than recommended by a bit, but from what I read on this site many people run it that way. I haven't had any issues so far.
 

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Tire pressure is certainly a valid topic for discussion, but I dislike seeing posts from new owners with next to no miles on the car. Please: 1)read the manual 2) drive it for awhile 3) talk to your dealer. Then post .JMHO.
 

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ok just to grip.. but really who the H.e. double hockey stick measures there tire pressure in KPA!! This frustrates me on my 2012 Avalanche, I figured by now they maybe could let me select what screen I want in imperial vs metric instead of changing all of them in one shot..
 

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Maybe I missed the point of a forum.. Quick answers to simple questions. Sorry I didn't memorize the 350 page manual the 140 page infotainment manual or feel the need to run to my dealer every time a light flashes. Now what about the dash.. it's no where to be found in either manual.. maybe in text it describes things somewhere but finding the exact paragraph in novel is not easy to do. This is the purpose of forum.. if you don't want to answer.. move on.
 

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The thread is old, it has almost been a year since the last post.
 

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The thread is old, it has almost been a year since the last post.
That's OK. Just because the post is old, doesn't mean it's not relevant. The system was designed by Americans. They know we use metric here in Canada but I'll bet they likely don't know that we still measure tire pressure by psi (although electronic pressure gauges give you a choice) or that we still use the English system in building products (to not confuse the poor Americans with lumber exported down there). It would be too much of a hassle to individually program each parameter to our liking and most if not all other countries measure in kp. I found that the pressure gauges are more accurate than the one in the tires (at least in my case). Tire pressures go down with cold and up with heat. Normal air normally dissipates out of tires so they have to be periodically checked. The exception (at least to some degree) is if you fill your tire with nitrogen (larger molecules) of which normal air is 80% (so not exactly a rare commodity) except you'll only find compressed nitrogen at your tire store (some even advertise this fact).
 

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I have found that the factory original tires seem to leak air a bit faster that any I have had before.
This is all of them not just one.

we Just had one week of 105 to 110 deg F and after going back to the 90 to 92
they were 3 PSI beflow the 2 week before 90 F readings ( I keep mine at 39-40 and add air if 38 or lower )

Interesting funny -- if you look at the tires there is a note that says WARNING but the words under that say Made in Canada
if you keep looking around the tire you will see the lable for max tire pressure which I guess was the warning :)

Still have the same tires now for almost 7 years
 

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Keep the tires in my Volt at 38 psi. I don't have any issues with rough ride.

I swapped the original tires with the Nokian WRG3s that I used to have in the Passat TDI that got returned to VW as buyback, because of the infamous diesel emission scandal -great coincidence that the 2012 Volt has the same OEM tire size as the 2012 Passat!-.
 
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