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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I'm going to take a long road trip--2500-3000 miles--later in the year. I'm planning to buy a [brand new] Volt for the trip, but I'd like to put the purchase off for as long as possible.

My question is, "How long should I own the Volt, using it for city driving, before I trust it on a major road trip?"

Thanks for your thoughts!

Jan

[edited to remove picture, which was confusing people]
 

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You may want to clarify whether it is a "new to you" or a truly "new" Volt. From the pic I assume it is a "new to you" used Volt. I would trust it immediately if it is a new Volt or a well cared for used one.
 

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I'm pretty sure you are overthinking things.
Assuming you are buying used (since you show a Gen 1 photo) then the standard rules apply such as check the fluids, and the tires. Other than that you should be good to go.
 

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I'm pretty sure you are overthinking things.
Assuming you are buying used (since you show a Gen 1 photo) then the standard rules apply such as check the fluids, and the tires. Other than that you should be good to go.
Agreed. Used Volt, just follow any pre-trip maintenance/inspection tips.

New car, I'd still wait for about 1K miles prior taking any new vehicle on an extended road trip personally. YMMV.
 

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Since new cars no longer specify break-in oil and a change at 1000 mi. a new Volt is ready for any type driving on Day 1. I "broke in" my Gen 1 in a mountain climb that had the engine working hard. I worried a little but the engine performed perfectly until lease return at 30K mi. The Gen 2 engine pretty much loafs in silence in level, no-headwind freeway driving.
 

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Gen 1 or Gen 2 .. the way the Volt's ICE work, it does not operate like a typical ice car which could need to be broken-in. Even many modern ice cars do not come with a break-in period because of improvements in machining and precision. So, you should be OK to take your Volt on a road trip whenever you feel like it .. just take standard precautions like checking fluid levels, tire pressure, tire tread, wheel balancing/rotation/alignment, spare wheel (if you are not comfortable relying on tire gunk or waiting for road side assistance), etc. Do not forget to engage Mountain Mode (ahead of time) if you plan to drive over large elevations.
 

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I second the suggestion of adding the spare wheel. You will lose some cargo space, but stuff happens in the most inopportune locations and times.

Otherwise, have a great trip!
 

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You probably worry about bears in your tent when you are camping. If you are concerned about mechanical failure of your transportation, then carry a down sleeping bag, sleeping pad, tent, down jacket, cell phone, air pump, and power source with battery jumper cables like I do whenever I leave home. However, worry more about being killed by a drunk, dozing, or distracted driver when you travel and avoid driving at peak times for these hazards. Avoid driving at high speeds, especially in bad weather. I have never seen a broken-down or crashed Volt, but pass plenty of pick-up trucks and SUV's on the shoulders and ditches.
 

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From my 80,000 miles of experience with the Volt 1, if your Volt drives well for the first 200 miles, you are good to go mechanically. The riskiest part of your Volt is definitely the tires. Cary a spare if you are not near civilization for a good part of your trip, especially with the OEM tires.
 

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There have been enough quirky issues with new Volts and older Volts that I would personally want to have it for at least a month, 1000 miles, before leaving town. Some people have reported discovering issues on the drive away from the dealership. It would be much more inconvenient to deal with repairs while out of town. A repair can take a week or more if parts must be ordered, etc. You want to allow time for that possibility without delaying your departure. Also remember to drive it on gas before your trip, rather than just electric.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
You probably worry about bears in your tent when you are camping. If you are concerned about mechanical failure of your transportation, then carry a down sleeping bag, sleeping pad, tent, down jacket, cell phone, air pump, and power source with battery jumper cables like I do whenever I leave home. However, worry more about being killed by a drunk, dozing, or distracted driver when you travel and avoid driving at peak times for these hazards. Avoid driving at high speeds, especially in bad weather. I have never seen a broken-down or crashed Volt, but pass plenty of pick-up trucks and SUV's on the shoulders and ditches.
Maybe I'll just stay home! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There have been enough quirky issues with new Volts and older Volts that I would personally want to have it for at least a month, 1000 miles, before leaving town. Some people have reported discovering issues on the drive away from the dealership. It would be much more inconvenient to deal with repairs while out of town. A repair can take a week or more if parts must be ordered, etc. You want to allow time for that possibility without delaying your departure. Also remember to drive it on gas before your trip, rather than just electric.
This is what concerns me the most (after bears), those initial flaws that require dealer attention. I can handle getting the car a month in advance of the trip. Thanks!
 

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I wouldn't worry about it. I did 300 mile day trips every weekend with my new Volt. Cars don't need to be broken in anymore. In the old days cars came with breakin oil which you needed to change after the first 1000 miles and it was recommended that you keep the speed down before that first oil change. After that first oil change the metal filings and rough edges would be out of the engine and you could use the car normally. Those days are gone, you can run the Volt on it's factory oil for 2 years before the first change (I intend to have mine changed after one year). BTW there was a very funny scene in a Pink Panther movie where Inspector Clouseau commandeers a car for a high speed chase. The owner had just picked the car up from the dealer and was trying to keep it under 40MPH but Clouseau stomped on his gas pedal foot so that they could pursue the villains.
 

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Do a few trips locally/in civilization to ensure your engine is working properly.

Mine had infant mortality issues and died the second time I used it.
Has been flawless since. But if that had been the start of a cross-country trip? Vacation ruined.

But an actual "break-in" procedure is not really in line with the usage style of the volt.
The engine is always used to its peak and the computer knows how to treat it well.
 

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I'm pretty sure you are overthinking things.
Assuming you are buying used (since you show a Gen 1 photo) then the standard rules apply such as check the fluids, and the tires. Other than that you should be good to go.
OP said "brand new"
 

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There have been enough quirky issues with new Volts and older Volts that I would personally want to have it for at least a month, 1000 miles, before leaving town. Some people have reported discovering issues on the drive away from the dealership. It would be much more inconvenient to deal with repairs while out of town. A repair can take a week or more if parts must be ordered, etc. You want to allow time for that possibility without delaying your departure. Also remember to drive it on gas before your trip, rather than just electric.
This is a good response. We know you are buying a brand new Volt, and I think with each passing month that the Gen 2 has been out GM continues to address any known issues meaning you probably won't have any (unless you buy a car that's been on the lot for several months, then it's not quite as new).

I'll add that driving it for at least 1,000 miles, at least a month give or take, will also familiarize you with your new Volt before taking that road trip. No need to have the added minor stress of getting to know your new vehicle in addition to driving distances on your road trip.
 

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I agree, get a spare tire, scissor jack and tire lug wrench before you go on your first long distance trip. You will have X months free OnStar Service with all the trimmings so roadside assistance will be there should you need it.

With the Volt there is no break in period. I would suggest driving a new Volt or any new car, for a few weeks, locally before a long distance trip. That way you can check under the car for fluid leaks make sure all of the systems are working properly.

My Volt's only issue, to date, surfaced at 5000 miles and required leaving my Volt at the dealer for 4 days. You might want to map out your route and identify possible Chevrolet dealers along the way in case you encounter a problem. Check in advance to see if they service the Volt, not all Chevrolet dealers choose to carry and service the Volt.
 

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Let's look at it from a financial point of view. If you are determined to buy one anyway, and assuming you get the same deals now that you would get later, there isn't much reason to hold off other than holding onto your payment or downpayment a little longer to get maybe a happy meal's worth of compounding interest. Sure the longer you hold off, the more money you might save in the bank to make a bigger down payment, but in the grand scheme of things, I don't see much difference in the long run whether you buy now or a few months later. But if it were me, I'd hold off buying any car until you can pay for it with cash.... that's just me. Many others on this forum are happy to give their hard earned cash to finance companies.

From a depreciation and wear and tear standpoint, I'd just rent a car for this long trip and either leave the new volt at home or buy it after the trip. Plus if you smile and are really nice to the pretty lady on the other side of the rental counter, you might get something really cool to drive. I once scored a Volvo C30 as a replacement for a Camry that smelled like someone smoked in it. That was the most fun I've ever had in a rental car.
 
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