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Good videos, but they seem to indicate that the AFS Trinity is a parallel hybrid, like the Prius. We all know that those have a mpg ceiling, and don't work to eliminate the need for petroleum.

I am glad that they are actually showcasing capacitor technology. Hopefully GM is reviewing their configuration and cherry picking techs that can help GM improve the Volt - a cap buffer between the batteries and motor should help extend battery life.
 

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Good videos, but they seem to indicate that the AFS Trinity is a parallel hybrid, like the Prius. We all know that those have a mpg ceiling, and don't work to eliminate the need for petroleum.

I am glad that they are actually showcasing capacitor technology. Hopefully GM is reviewing their configuration and cherry picking techs that can help GM improve the Volt - a cap buffer between the batteries and motor should help extend battery life.
AFS car is a duel mode hybrid.

Eletric only 40 miles
Electric and Gas 150 miles to the gallon.

http://www.afstrinity.com/faq.htm


They can put their system in todays cars fro 8700 bucks. I would take my focus there today if they would sell it like an upgrade:)
 

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You will have to read the fine print of how the 150 mpg was calculated! It was in combo with an electric mode. If you take out the electric mode from the equation, the mpg goes down to almost like that of an ordinary ICE, or just slightly better.
 

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You will have to read the fine print of how the 150 mpg was calculated! It was in combo with an electric mode. If you take out the electric mode from the equation, the mpg goes down to almost like that of an ordinary ICE, or just slightly better.
Who cares? That 40 miles all EV range is key. I'd buy it and consider converting if AFS offered the upgrade. These conversion shops are popping up and there may be a market for them. Some may be the real deal; some may be scams. But $8700 for converting an EV SUV? That is tempting. In fact, assuming the specs are similar, it may be a better buy than the Volt if it lasts (battery life).
 

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Who cares? That 40 miles all EV range is key. I'd buy it and consider converting if AFS offered the upgrade. These conversion shops are popping up and there may be a market for them. Some may be the real deal; some may be scams. But $8700 for converting an EV SUV? That is tempting. In fact, assuming the specs are similar, it may be a better buy than the Volt if it lasts (battery life).
You don't care? Remember, the 40 mile range is only for 50% of the consumers. For $8,700 more and you only get like 26 mpg after you subtract the mileage for electricity! The Volt gets 50 mpg after the initial battery power drain.
 

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You don't care? Remember, the 40 mile range is only for 50% of the consumers. For $8,700 more and you only get like 26 mpg after you subtract the mileage for electricity! The Volt gets 50 mpg after the initial battery power drain.

I disagree with your numbers. The 50% of consumers isn't the figure that GM has been throwing around; it's more like 90% of daily communters drive less than 40 miles. And for me, I truly do not care. I want an option that doesn't burn gas. 40 miles is enough to do it.
 

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I disagree with your numbers. The 50% of consumers isn't the figure that GM has been throwing around; it's more like 90% of daily communters drive less than 40 miles. And for me, I truly do not care. I want an option that doesn't burn gas. 40 miles is enough to do it.
I misread the graph and my first quote is off slightly but it is not my numbers, you are disagreeing with the established facts:

Here's an actual published data from our very own Department of Transportation, unless you live in another country:



The 120 mile daily driving range fits 98% of the US drivers:
 

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That data is more than 27 years old. With the price of oil spiking to record level at least weekly, it might affected the driving habits of today. I'll try to find a more updated chart.
 

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Here's a 2004 Survey, note of the word one-way.

3.3 Million Americans are "Stretch Commuters" Traveling at Least 50 Miles One-Way to Work


Wednesday, May 12, 2004 - About 3.3 million Americans travel 50 miles or more one way to get to work - and they commute these distances 329 million times a year, according to National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) findings released today by the Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS).

Of the 61.6 billion commutes to and/or from work each year, just under one out of every 200 trips is a "stretch commute."

Who is a "stretch commuter?"

"Stretch commuters" are mostly male. Women - 52 percent of the population - only make 16 percent of "stretch commuting" trips.

Nearly three out of five "stretch commuting" trips are made by someone from a household with an annual income of at least $50,000. Slightly more than two out of five U.S. households earn that much. Five out of six "stretch commutes" are made by workers in manufacturing, construction, professional, managerial or technical jobs. By comparison, those in the sales and administrative workforce make considerably fewer "stretch commute" trips.

"Stretch commutes" are disproportionately rural - two out of every five "stretch commutes" start in rural areas. Eight out of 10 (81 percent) "stretch commutes" are 50 to 99 miles in length one way. For these commuters, "stretch commuting" is nearly an everyday occurrence - about two-thirds of the 50- to 99-mile one-way commutes are made at least four days each week.

While one out of five (19 percent) "stretch commutes" is at least 100 miles, more than one in 20 (six percent) can be called "super-stretch commutes," trips to work of 200 miles or more, one-way.

Click here for the complete article:
http://www.bts.gov/press_releases/2004/bts010_04/html/bts010_04.html
 

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GM's data determined:

That 78% of Commuters Drive Less Than 40 miles per day.

http://gm-volt.com/2007/12/06/how-did-gm-determine-that-78-of-commuters-drive-less-than-40-miles-per-day/


So I don't agree that searching "stretch commuting" helps here. My point is that this is a viable offering and a very reasonable price, assuming it performs as promised. And stop saying the Volt goes 50 miles per charge. It is supposed to go 40 at end of life but they seem to be hoping it goes greater than 40 off the lot. But all evidence points to it going 40 all electric range.
 

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GM's data determined:

That 78% of Commuters Drive Less Than 40 miles per day.

http://gm-volt.com/2007/12/06/how-did-gm-determine-that-78-of-commuters-drive-less-than-40-miles-per-day/


So I don't agree that searching "stretch commuting" helps here. My point is that this is a viable offering and a very reasonable price, assuming it performs as promised. And stop saying the Volt goes 50 miles per charge. It is supposed to go 40 at end of life but they seem to be hoping it goes greater than 40 off the lot. But all evidence points to it going 40 all electric range.
In here you said it was 90%:
I disagree with your numbers. The 50% of consumers isn't the figure that GM has been throwing around; it's more like 90% of daily communters drive less than 40 miles. And for me, I truly do not care. I want an option that doesn't burn gas. 40 miles is enough to do it.
AND have you read the full article of stretch commuting. There is a reference there on the various impacts of driving ranges. Was just trying to find more recent surveys and post it here. I'll post latest data when I come across them. I usually would doubt any data coming from a seller. Independent but credible most recent data is better than our opinions.
 

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In here you said it was 90%:


AND have you read the full article of stretch commuting. There is a reference there on the various impacts of driving ranges. Was just trying to find more recent surveys and post it here. I'll post latest data when I come across them. I usually would doubt any data coming from a seller. Independent but credible most recent data is better than our opinions.
I suspect it only matters where consumers draw the line. I want something that looks like the volt, or even the MiEV and goes 100 miles range at up to 80 mph. We're just sort of stuck waiting for first to market to see how well it sells.
 
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