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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning. I recently acquired a "mechanic special" 2012 Volt Premier, and i'm working on diagnosing the issues to get it to charge. The hybrid battery is extremely low and throwing a code that can't be cleared, possibly keeping it from charging. Yesterday, I removed the charging port receptacle to inspect for any cracks, which I didn't find. I did find, however, one pin in the plug for the port that obviously got extremely hot at one point. Here are the pics:

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I don't have reason to believe this happened after I bought the car. I searched online, but my Google-Fu wasn't strong on this topic. I found lots regarding melting of the electrical outlets the chargers are on due to high heat from worn contacts. Has anyone ever come across an issue like this before? Thanks for the help.

B96v6
 

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Haven't seen that posted before. There have been one or two posts about a nearby lightning strike taking out the EVSE, fuses in the car. Search LIGHTNING STRIKE
 

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I did find, however, one pin in the plug for the port that obviously got extremely hot at one point.
Has anyone ever come across an issue like this before?
Yes, multiple times on other cars. (headlight harnesses, glow plug relay harness, blower fan connection, rear defogger, yadda, yadda). That is simply a situation of a less than optimal contact between the pin and socket to carry the electrical current. The compromised contact (loose or corroded) means there is resistance to the current flow. Resistance to an electrical current creates heat. It is that heat that melted the plastic into which the pin and socket are inserted.
Quick remedy: Cut the wires for just the compromised pin and socket as close to the plug ends as you can. Strip off enough insulation to allow soldering the two ends of the wires together, but don't connect the ends just yet. First inspect the copper wire conductor for evidence of heat damage and if necessary, keep cutting back and stripping until good wire is found. NOW you can solder or butt splice those wire ends together. Use a length of similar gauge wire as an extension if you had to cut way back to find good copper.
Consider adding a sufficiently sized male and female connector if you want to maintain easy disconnection capability. You'll end up with two connectors, one for the four undamaged conductors, and the male/female single you add as a replacement to the burned up 5th.

not lightning.
 

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Had something similar in one of my headlight connectors on my 1988 Tercel station wagon. Kept burning out lightbulbs. Cut out a connector from another Toyota at auto wreckers (slightly different). Spliced in connector. All good, That was decades ago. When a connection gets corroded its a downward spiral, more resistance = higher heat = more resistance = higher heat.
 

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I had the exact same thing. I needed to replace the port anyway and simply direct connected that wire outside of the orange plug. I used the heat shrink connectors with the built in solder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the responses, everyone. I've ordered a new port and will get that soon. In the meantime, the connector looks to be a bespoke Weatherpack, so i'll pull it apart and see about replacing the socket pin.
 

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.... I'll pull it apart and see about replacing the socket pin.
"..and then inserting the new pin and socket, as well as transferring the other four pins and sockets, to the new port."
That's what you meant to include before you hit the reply now button, Rght? Don't take the foolish shortcut of sticking a new pin and socket into the melted location on the old plug because it's 'easier' than pulling the other eight wire ends out..
 
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