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Just moved into a new house and had the builder wire a NEMA 14-50 50 amp circuit for a new EVSE. For me after owning a CC LCS-25 for 4+ years was another Clipper Creek.

So I bought a CC HCS-50P, the builder installed every thing for $200 (the main panel in 15 feet away.



Wanted a plug for when I get my Tesla and their OEM EVSE only pulls 40 amps so I'm super safe. For now it's OVER KILL with our 2017 Volt.
 

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Following the electrical code specification of a maximum of 80% continuous loading for an electrical circuit, 40 amps is the maximum continuous load on a 50 amp circuit.
 

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Just moved into a new house and had the builder wire a NEMA 14-50 50 amp circuit for a new EVSE. For me after owning a CC LCS-25 for 4+ years was another Clipper Creek.

Wanted a plug for when I get my Tesla and their OEM EVSE only pulls 40 amps so I'm super safe. For now it's OVER KILL with our 2017 Volt.
I understand opting to have the new 50 amp circuit installed - That WILL come in handy when you get your Tesla. What I don't understand is the purchase of the 50 amp Clipper Creek EVSE - Why not just install the LCS-25 you already own??

Don
 

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Indeed. You could have continued using your existing CC LCS-25 with your Volt at your new home. When you do get a Tesla then you could install the Tesla Wall Connector (now available with a NEMA 14-50 plug) and charge at up to 40 amps. The Tesla Wall Connector with NEMA 14-50 plug (retail price $500) costs significantly less than a CC HCS-50P (retail price $659.00). With the HCS-50P you would need to use the Tesla charging adapter (adding another interconnect between the Tesla's charging port and the charging cord) to charge a Tesla vehicle.
 
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