GM Volt Forum banner
1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Something under the hood is making a sound that resembles "pa pa pa pa" when plugging it in or unplugging it. I've noticed it now happens while I'm driving and I get that sound from under the hood. I tried to see whether it would go away if I ran it exclusively on the generator but it still made that sound. Any ideas as to what the culprit might be?

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
My favorite advice, check all your coolant levels on a level surface. It would be gurgling or popping due to air bubbles. Have a look and report back.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
My favorite advice, check all your coolant levels on a level surface. It would be gurgling or popping due to air bubbles. Have a look and report back.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
I looked at the reservoirs. The two side-by-side at the firewall in front of the steering column (one is large and the other is rather small and tucked in deep). The smaller of the two appears to be low. I looked at the cap that I was able to remove and it said only use DOT3. I stuck my finger in the reservoir and was able to feel a liquid at the bottom. So what is that reservoir for and could that be the cause of my pa pa pa sound?

Scott
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I looked at the reservoirs. The two side-by-side at the firewall in front of the steering column (one is large and the other is rather small and tucked in deep). The smaller of the two appears to be low. I looked at the cap that I was able to remove and it said only use DOT3. I stuck my finger in the reservoir and was able to feel a liquid at the bottom. So what is that reservoir for and could that be the cause of my pa pa pa sound?

Scott
aha! It is the brake fluid reservoir.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, Thank You to WhatAShocker! The noise I was hearing that the Chevy dealer could not diagnose must have been the brake pump kicking on and off. All good now. Much appreciated! I certainly owe you several beers for your advice!

Scott
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
So, Thank You to WhatAShocker! The noise I was hearing that the Chevy dealer could not diagnose must have been the brake pump kicking on and off. All good now. Much appreciated! I certainly owe you several beers for your advice!

Scott
Just glad it all worked out in the end! Like all cars a little top here or a little love and attention there shows our cars we are interested. Hahaha. Hope she continues to give you many more years of dependable service.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
So, Thank You to WhatAShocker! The noise I was hearing that the Chevy dealer could not diagnose must have been the brake pump kicking on and off. All good now. Much appreciated! I certainly owe you several beers for your advice!

Scott
Now though it's important to find out why the brake fluid was so low...there must be a leak somewhere. until you find that leak, keep checking the fluid level...it could save an accident.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,036 Posts
aha! It is the brake fluid reservoir.
Owners Manual, check all fluid levels monthly. Takes about 30 seconds. Can catch issues before they become bigger problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
225 Posts
Owners Manual, check all fluid levels monthly. Takes about 30 seconds. Can catch issues before they become bigger problems.
Folks sometimes forget that fluids... Virtually any fluids will evaporate. It's a fact. Important to always check fluids. I have a 1985 VW Vanagon Westfalia that has absolutely no leaks in the braking system and clutch (Vanagon uses brake fluid to hydraulically actuate the clutch) and it will drop a bit almost every spring. It's just a good practice to at least check. I wonder with all the BECM failures it's die to evaporation of fluids causing overheating even slightly over time. Proper maintenance is just good practice as an owner. My first generation Prius taught me very well to always check fluids. After an $8000 inverter replacement due to slightly low fluid levels (which is how Toyota got out of covering it under warranty, but I got them to agree to cover it after, LOL), you bet I was checking those damned fluids. And on an 1985 VW Vanagon, it can mean all the difference between getting there easily or having a completely wrecked and warped engine.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top