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My work has a free to use charger for us, so I would always fill up when at work. I'm in Florida, so almost all flat-land and warm most of the year. Only snows when pigs fly, so very rarely.

I'm considering a used 16/17 Volt, with a roundtrip commute of 56 miles (60% town/40% highway). In your opinion, if I use L mode and heavy regen braking, it it possible to work within the range for EV?

I'm also considering a 2018 Leaf and 2017 Volt. I like the drive of them all, but the Volt was the smoothest and most comfortable of all I tried.

Thoughts?
 

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What does RT mean? Is that round trip? If so, and you can charge at work, then you should be able to commute on 100% EV with a 2017 Volt, no problem there. You don't have to drive in L. Just drive in D, the car will use regen braking every time you tap the brakes. In fact, you could just about make a 56 mile trip in a 2017 on one charge, depending on conditions.

The Leaf really is a commuter car, where the Volt is a utility car that can take the long trips too.
So if you are looking to save some money maybe on the sticker price (how are the prices comparing?), and just want to commute in it, you might make a case for a Leaf.
 

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My work has a free to use charger for us, so I would always fill up when at work. I'm in Florida, so almost all flat-land and warm most of the year. Only snows when pigs fly, so very rarely.

I'm considering a used 16/17 Volt, with a roundtrip commute of 56 miles (60% town/40% highway). In your opinion, if I use L mode and heavy regen braking, it it possible to work within the range for EV?

I'm also considering a 2018 Leaf and 2017 Volt. I like the drive of them all, but the Volt was the smoothest and most comfortable of all I tried.

Thoughts?
I do a 60 mile round trip commute with about the same breakdown, of 60% country road, 40% highway. In the summer I have 12 miles to spare when I get home, in the winter (not an issue for you) I use a teaspoon of gas because the battery runs out a block from home. A 56 mile round trip is absolutely no problem in a 2017 Volt in warm weather. The Volt is a much better car than the Leaf. Nissan doesn't cool their battery so they've had lots of degradation problems especially in hot States like yours. GM was extremely conservative with their battery system. I have 40K miles on my 2017 and I've had zero loss of range, everyone else in this group reports the same. Also the Volt is road trip capable because it also has an engine, this time of year I get 45-50 MPG on the engine when I take 300 mile daytrips, which I do every weekend.
 

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What everyone said. In a Volt you could most likely do that round trip without charging at work at all. Your situation sounds like a perfect fit for that 2017 Volt.
 

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We have a 2016 Volt since buying new in July 2016. Here in northwestern Oregon in spring and summer we get at least 55-60 miles of electric range. I would believe that Florida's weather in the winter is probably like our weather in the summer. So even a 56 mile roundtrip could be made just on electric.

Don't worry too much when you run out of juice the Gen 2 gasoline engine is very fuel efficient and 40-50 mpg should be the results just on gas, regular 87 octane as well. Our voltstats.net result for nearly 23,000 miles on gasoline only is 49.78 mpg (avg. mpg lifetime) 66,000 miles so far total on the odometer.
 

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What everyone said. In a Volt you could most likely do that round trip without charging at work at all. Your situation sounds like a perfect fit for that 2017 Volt.
Since the OP stated that free charging was available at their workplace the OP should plan on charging while at work as often as possible Monday - Friday, charge at home on the weekend and as required. Envision leaving work each day with a fully charged Volt battery, arriving home with 50% of the battery charge remaining. Don't plug in at home, wait until the next day to charge at work. If you sometimes exceed your EV range on the trip back into work then you will use a few ounces of gas; the Volt needs to use a small amount of gas every 6 weeks anyway (to circulate fluids and lubricate engine parts) so it won't make a difference in your overall efficiency. Keep the fuel tank 1/3rd full (approx. 3 gallons of gas) unless you are taking a longer trip.

Driving ~56 miles using only the battery is definitely within the EV driving range of the Gen 2 Volt, especially in summer. If you can limit your highway speed to no more than 62 - 65 MPH your EV range should enable you to make the round trip purely in EV mode. No need to drive in L unless you want to; no need to restrict use of the AC unless you like driving with the windows open. Just drive and enjoy the savings.
 

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Not a problem with this commute. In the summer you should be able to make this round trip on a single charge. Being able to charge at work will guarantee it. I'd recommend a L2 charger for home though, just to ensure you have a full charge each morning (what if the charger at work is in use).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wow. You guys rock :) Thank you so much for the feedback and advice. Seems like a Volt purchase will be a good option for now. Future will be full EV, but for now, I feel much more comfortable going the Volt route.
 

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My work has a free to use charger for us, so I would always fill up when at work. I'm in Florida, so almost all flat-land and warm most of the year. Only snows when pigs fly, so very rarely.

I'm considering a used 16/17 Volt, with a roundtrip commute of 56 miles (60% town/40% highway). In your opinion, if I use L mode and heavy regen braking, it it possible to work within the range for EV?

I'm also considering a 2018 Leaf and 2017 Volt. I like the drive of them all, but the Volt was the smoothest and most comfortable of all I tried.

Thoughts?
The 2018 Volt is a 2nd Gen Volt, and if you don't drive like a speed maniac, just the speed limit, you'll be able to do it in just one charge. But if you drive like a speed maniac, going 85 mph, you would need to charge at work.

I get 76 miles to a charge of my 2017 Volt regularly during spring. This summer I only get 70 miles to a charge because I need creature comfort. I follow speed limits but commuting rush hour traffic keeps me below the speed limits half the time.
 

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Driving ~56 miles using only the battery is definitely within the EV driving range of the Gen 2 Volt, especially in summer. If you can limit your highway speed to no more than 62 - 65 MPH your EV range should enable you to make the round trip purely in EV mode. No need to drive in L unless you want to; no need to restrict use of the AC unless you like driving with the windows open. Just drive and enjoy the savings.
No one (including the OP) has mentioned charging at home. If you charge at home, and at work, then yes, the Volt will make the round trip with range to spare. If the OP was planning on charging only at work, then he's getting close to the range limit of the battery, perhaps too close to be certain of always being able make the round trip only on the battery.
 

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No one (including the OP) has mentioned charging at home. If you charge at home, and at work, then yes, the Volt will make the round trip with range to spare. If the OP was planning on charging only at work, then he's getting close to the range limit of the battery, perhaps too close to be certain of always being able make the round trip only on the battery.
My response did not emphasize charging at home because the OP stated they have free to use charging at work. When you have free charging at work you should make maximum use of this perk, charge at home only as required.
 

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Not a problem with this commute. In the summer you should be able to make this round trip on a single charge. Being able to charge at work will guarantee it. I'd recommend a L2 charger for home though, just to ensure you have a full charge each morning (what if the charger at work is in use).
No one (including the OP) has mentioned charging at home. If you charge at home, and at work, then yes, the Volt will make the round trip with range to spare. If the OP was planning on charging only at work, then he's getting close to the range limit of the battery, perhaps too close to be certain of always being able make the round trip only on the battery.
I recommended an L2 charger specifically so OP would have a full battery each day.
 

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My response did not emphasize charging at home because the OP stated they have free to use charging at work. When you have free charging at work you should make maximum use of this perk, charge at home only as required.
It's more important to always be charged, it only costs $3 a day to charge a Volt in MA, I'd bet it's a whole lot less than that in FL. I'd charge in both places so that I had the maximum flexibility and the least chance of having to use the engine.
 

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It's more important to always be charged, it only costs $3 a day to charge a Volt in MA, I'd bet it's a whole lot less than that in FL. I'd charge in both places so that I had the maximum flexibility and the least chance of having to use the engine.
From a financial savings perspective that does not compute. When you can get something of value, i.e. electricity to charge your plug-in vehicle, at no personal expense you want to maximize that savings. If the OP only charges while at work, given that they may need to charge at home on the weekend they are reducing their cost per mile for electricity by more than 70%. Over time that is a huge savings. The Volt needs to consume a little bit of gas every 6 weeks anyway. If they end up using the ICE on occasion on the return trip into work then this would be part of the fuel that the Volt would use to maintain the health of the ICE. If this was a Bolt instead of a Volt the same logic would apply; charge at work as much as possible, charge at home or at public charging stations that cost you $ only as required.

If the OP consistently exceeded their EV range on the return trip into work by 4 or so miles or ~1kWh they could plug in at home using Level 1 charging at 8 amps for 1 hour. This would help ensure that they would not use any gas for the return trip. That would cost an additional ~$0.12 to $0.15 per day for commuting into work Tuesday through Friday ($0.48 - $0.60 per week.) That is still more economical than performing 50% of your vehicle charging at home at whatever this costs when you don't have to.
 

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I'm also in FL. My commute is from Clermont to south Orlando off the OBT and about an hour 10 round trip. I also charge free at work and my entire week is all electric.
 

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My response did not emphasize charging at home because the OP stated they have free to use charging at work. When you have free charging at work you should make maximum use of this perk, charge at home only as required.
We have chargers at work, but due to the number of electric cars we are limited to 3 hours charging time (Chargepoint has a nice feature that allows you to get into the queue and assigns you a charger). I get to work early so charging isn't a problem for me. I have 50 miles RT, with some highway, mostly city. I charge at home, and sometimes at work. I will say that depending on chargers and number of vehicles that need recharging, the OP may not be able to always charge at work. 56 miles is the outside range for me, I can sometimes do it with my 2018, but often times 50-52 is the max. So some fuel may be required. I don't think twice about using fuel because I do it so rarely. I'm still on the tank of fuel I put into the car last October.
 

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In the OP's own words "My work has a free to use charger for us, so I would always fill up when at work." If the OP cannot fully charge while at work then they would also need to charge at home but this remains TBD.
 

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If the OP fully charges at work and at home, there is no question the commute could be made with almost any car, such as a Gen 2 or Gen 1 Volt or a Leaf, even an older Leaf with some battery degredation. If he is trying to drive the whole 56 miles on a single charge and not use gas, only then does it require a careful choice of vehicle. If that is the case, he still has some choices, but I would just caution him that he should avoid any of the shorter range Leafs. New EV owners often underestimate the amount of range cushion you need in a BEV. You won't get the stated range in all conditions, such as cool weather, rain, high speed driving, or traffic jams. Or you may need to run an extra errand, etc. Also, the charger at work may be out of service sometimes, or occupied by other drivers, or decommissioned by your employer. You might occasionally forget to plug your car in. You want a car that will be good for any of those circumstances.
 
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