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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My Chevy Dealer forgot to reset TPMS on my 2013 Volt after the last tire rotation. I was in two minds whether to take it back or live with it. One fine day, I decided to fix it myself.

First, I purchased a TPMS reset tool from Amazon for $40. It arrived the very next day!
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XVR85N7/

To reset TPMS, I started my Volt, selected Tire Pressure screen using the selector knob (to the left side of the steering), and then Pressed the knob for about 5 seconds. This bought up a message asking if I wanted to Do a TPMS relearn process. I selected Yes, and was immediately jolted in my seat because the car honked twice in it's full glory (unlike those tiny chirps it makes when plugged in). This was its way of confirming it had entered TPMS relearn process. It was quite loud, and because my garage door was open, probably annoyed a few of the neighbors. And, this was just the beginning!

I proceeded to the driver side front tire, held the TPMS reset tool near the valve stem and pressed the reset button (the tool only has one button). A few seconds later, the horn honked to confirm ... and because I was outside the car, bent low, right next to the tire, the horn sounded even more louder, startling me again!

I repeated the process next with the front passenger side tire, back passenger side tire and finally, back driver side tire , each time bracing myself for the loud confirmation honk.

And when all four tires were done, it confirmed one final time with two loud honks. All in all, 8 honks! By this time, my wife had come into the garage, concerned with all the honks. But I was doing just fine ... smug in the knowledge that I had reset my TPMS sensors all by myself!

Was $40 for the TPMS tool worth it? I think so. I can now rotate my tires at home or COSTCO (rotation is free but they charge $3 per tire if I ask them to reset TPMS .. depending on who is at the counter). I can reset TPMS myself now. The tool should pay for itself in a year or two!
 

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On my 2012, it automatically sorts itself out after a few minutes of driving.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
On my 2012, it automatically sorts itself out after a few minutes of driving.
I wonder how it does that! I can't think of any simple way it can figure the correct position of each TPMS sensor. I have a 2013, and it does not sort itself out, however long I drive.

However, 2011 Volts (and some 2012s, perhaps) have another trick -- you can start the relearn process and release air from each tire in the order I described. Once air is released for a few seconds and the car detects a loss of about 5 PSI (which can take up to a minute), it learns the position of that tire .... same as using the relearning tool, but free. Of course, you will need to refill air after the relearn process.
 

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Each sensor has a unique code that has to be associated with the wheel position it's in. It will work and display pressure, but it won't be in the correct location on the DIC (after rotation, and before re-programming). I labelled each rim behind the valve stem so I could tell which one was displaying what before I bucked up and bought the tool. Yes, the horn honks are a bit over the top. Tire shops must love it.
 

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It is a crap shoot whether the dealer resets the TPMS after a rotation here as well. First time they forgot. I went back and had them redo it. The second time it happened I did not notice till one of the TPMS sensors started failing. It reported a low tire, so I added air to all tires using a digital gauge. A week later it showed low again and I just added air and took off. It was then I noticed that one tire had too much air and the "low" one was still low. In it went for a new sensor, and came back with a proper re-learn.

The next time I needed a rotation, it came back without the re-learn being done. Seeing as how the dealer is no longer performing free maintenance, I just decided to wait till it needs a rotation again. Hmm, It may be time, although I think 6 years may be stretching it for the 2 remaining original tires, maybe I'll just get a new pair...
 

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After 6+ years of owning my Volt, I still don't understand the need to have the car tell me which specific tire is either flat or has low pressure. If the software says a tire is flat it should be pretty obvious upon visual inspection which tire has generated the warning. If the software says a tire has low pressure I always check and adjust ALL tires, so having the TPMS system flag a specific location is not that much value to me. I can't imagine just checking and adjusting one tire. My brain has enough capacity to remember which tire was low so that, should it happen again, I can act accordingly.

VIN # B0985
 

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After 6+ years of owning my Volt, I still don't understand the need to have the car tell me which specific tire is either flat or has low pressure. If the software says a tire is flat it should be pretty obvious upon visual inspection which tire has generated the warning. If the software says a tire has low pressure I always check and adjust ALL tires, so having the TPMS system flag a specific location is not that much value to me. I can't imagine just checking and adjusting one tire. My brain has enough capacity to remember which tire was low so that, should it happen again, I can act accordingly.

VIN # B0985
We've had people post that the car told them a specific tire was losing air, they get out, it looks fine. They get back in and continue driving while a different tire goes flat. Their TPMS was indicating the wrong tire and they did not think to check all 4.
 

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We've had people post that the car told them a specific tire was losing air, they get out, it looks fine. They get back in and continue driving while a different tire goes flat. Their TPMS was indicating the wrong tire and they did not think to check all 4.
A perfect argument that the warning system is flawed because it relies on human action to work correctly. So make it more robust and not require "relearning" or dumb it down to "there is a problem, check it out".

VIN # B0985
 

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After 6+ years of owning my Volt, I still don't understand the need to have the car tell me which specific tire is either flat or has low pressure. If the software says a tire is flat it should be pretty obvious upon visual inspection which tire has generated the warning. If the software says a tire has low pressure I always check and adjust ALL tires, so having the TPMS system flag a specific location is not that much value to me. I can't imagine just checking and adjusting one tire. My brain has enough capacity to remember which tire was low so that, should it happen again, I can act accordingly.

VIN # B0985
I do like seeing which one is low, but realistically it doesn't save much time, just the extra minute to check all tires vs just checking one. With the current system, I'd only check all the tires if the one it said was low didn't actually measure low, otherwise I'd believe it. I do like seeing actual pressure readings. I've had the warning pop up on the highway and I was able to see how fast it was dropping. If it was very slow, I could possibly continue to where I was going or at least a convenient exit. If it was dropping fast, I'd pull over before I started having control issues.
 

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After 6+ years of owning my Volt, I still don't understand the need to have the car tell me which specific tire is either flat or has low pressure. If the software says a tire is flat it should be pretty obvious upon visual inspection which tire has generated the warning. If the software says a tire has low pressure I always check and adjust ALL tires, so having the TPMS system flag a specific location is not that much value to me. I can't imagine just checking and adjusting one tire. My brain has enough capacity to remember which tire was low so that, should it happen again, I can act accordingly.

VIN # B0985
http://s294.photobucket.com/user/chieftmc/media/common-sense.jpg.html?sort=3&o=20
 

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After 6+ years of owning my Volt, I still don't understand the need to have the car tell me which specific tire is either flat or has low pressure. If the software says a tire is flat it should be pretty obvious upon visual inspection which tire has generated the warning. If the software says a tire has low pressure I always check and adjust ALL tires, so having the TPMS system flag a specific location is not that much value to me. I can't imagine just checking and adjusting one tire. My brain has enough capacity to remember which tire was low so that, should it happen again, I can act accordingly.

VIN # B0985
That's why most manufacturers now have ditched TPMS sensors and gone to using the ABS system to detect a leak. When one tire starts spinning faster over a set period of time it flags the TPMS light. Honda, VW, Mazda and Toyota have all switched from sensors to ABS. AND they put a reset button on the dashboard or in the glovebox.

My 2004 mazda would figure out where each tire was after a rotation and you could have it tell you the pressure and location of the low tire on the radio. 13 years ago.
 

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My Chevy Dealer forgot to reset TPMS on my 2013 Volt after the last tire rotation. I was in two minds whether to take it back or live with it. One fine day, I decided to fix it myself.

First, I purchased a TPMS reset tool from Amazon for $40. It arrived the very next day!
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B06XVR85N7/

To reset TPMS, I started my Volt, selected Tire Pressure screen using the selector knob (to the left side of the steering), and then Pressed the knob for about 5 seconds. This bought up a message asking if I wanted to Do a TPMS relearn process. I selected Yes, and was immediately jolted in my seat because the car honked twice in it's full glory (unlike those tiny chirps it makes when plugged in). This was its way of confirming it had entered TPMS relearn process. It was quite loud, and because my garage door was open, probably annoyed a few of the neighbors. And, this was just the beginning!

I proceeded to the driver side front tire, held the TPMS reset tool near the valve stem and pressed the reset button (the tool only has one button). A few seconds later, the horn honked to confirm ... and because I was outside the car, bent low, right next to the tire, the horn sounded even more louder, startling me again!

I repeated the process next with the front passenger side tire, back passenger side tire and finally, back driver side tire , each time bracing myself for the loud confirmation honk.

And when all four tires were done, it confirmed one final time with two loud honks. All in all, 8 honks! By this time, my wife had come into the garage, concerned with all the honks. But I was doing just fine ... smug in the knowledge that I had reset my TPMS sensors all by myself!

Was $40 for the TPMS tool worth it? I think so. I can now rotate my tires at home or COSTCO (rotation is free but they charge $3 per tire if I ask them to reset TPMS .. depending on who is at the counter). I can reset TPMS myself now. The tool should pay for itself in a year or two!
That is a good price for the TPMS tool. Most had to pay around $80. Thanks for the link. I picked one up for $40 myself.
 

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Thank you for the link, I just ordered one for myself.

While I'm perfectly capable of checking all wheels if one reports a low pressure, it just bothers me to no end when I know that the reported positions are wrong. $40.00 for a little more peace of mind is worth it to me.
 

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On my 2012, it automatically sorts itself out after a few minutes of driving.
The TPMS will start showing pressure readings, yes. But unless the tire positions have been relearned using the tool, the car does not know the tire is in a new location.

Relearning is not hard or time consuming, but it is dependent on someone at the dealer/tire shop actually doing it. Just like getting the lug nuts torqued correctly.

Sadly, you can't rely on either happening correctly and I do my own tire rotations. The relearn is always performed, the lug nuts are not over-(or under)tightened, and I thoroughly inspect the tires for wear, screws, cracking, and tread depth. Things I suspect are often overlooked.
 

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I selected Yes, and was immediately jolted in my seat because the car honked twice in it's full glory (unlike those tiny chirps it makes when plugged in). This was its way of confirming it had entered TPMS relearn process. It was quite loud, and because my garage door was open, probably annoyed a few of the neighbors. And, this was just the beginning!

I proceeded to the driver side front tire, held the TPMS reset tool near the valve stem and pressed the reset button (the tool only has one button). A few seconds later, the horn honked to confirm ... and because I was outside the car, bent low, right next to the tire, the horn sounded even more louder, startling me again!

I repeated the process next with the front passenger side tire, back passenger side tire and finally, back driver side tire , each time bracing myself for the loud confirmation honk.



Life Pro Tip for future TPMS resets on your Gen1:

To avoid the unnecessary honking just temporarily pull out the above solid state relay.
Your Gen1 will still lead you thru the reprogram with the blinking turn signals follow success just not the gawd-awfully loud honks though!:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Life Pro Tip for future TPMS resets on your Gen1:

To avoid the unnecessary honking just temporarily pull out the above solid state relay.
Your Gen1 will still lead you thru the reprogram with the blinking turn signals follow success just not the gawd-awfully loud honks though!:cool:
Thanks for the tip. Will try to remember this next time. I wonder why the horn relay was placed all the way at the back!

Reminds me of an incident many decades ago, in another car of mine. I had to quickly access and remove the horn relay because the contacts inside had arced and fused, and the horn was honking incessantly. Fortunately, all the fuses/relays on that (obviously much simpler) car were in one place, in the front.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thank you for the link, I just ordered one for myself.

While I'm perfectly capable of checking all wheels if one reports a low pressure, it just bothers me to no end when I know that the reported positions are wrong. $40.00 for a little more peace of mind is worth it to me.
Me 2. When the car has a feature, and it does not work as intended, it bothers me a lot. The TPMS system in my other (much much older) vehicle is much simpler .. it just shows that pressure is low - not which tire.
 
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