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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Will be interoperable with my home EMS (energy management system) and workplace EMS. Will be capable of controlled 0kw to 6.6 kw charging with SCADA (system control and data acq) by third party aggregator. Will be capable of automatic frequency regulation ($10 upgrade of tech developed by PNNL) These tasks will be performed with minimal battery degradation and fully covered by warranty.

There are anecdotes of ON Star working with people like Timber Rock to do these things but just at very small demo stage at this point. I think a few dealers are demo ing these kinds of systems. If we are going to scale up EVs to high percentalge of the overall fleet...as in 99% then we need sophisticated but cheap aggregation and EMS which is coming.

An EV PHEV , REV is part of an emerging smart system. To buy component separately without knowing how they fit together is.........well un systematic. and wasteful of multiple potentials.
My volt I.o was 92% of the time a stationary energy storage device (SES) about 8 % of the tyime it was a mobile device. Why not utilize the capabilities of the other 92%? Is there any other connected device that is so poorly utilized? Especially a connected device that costs over $35,000.
Think of your $500 smart phone and imagine if all you did was 'make calls' on it. IT, and EMS are coming to EVs, the next paradigm shift is in realizing what the energy capabilities of the connected device are, learning them, manifesting them and harvesting the benefits.
 

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To me the elephant in the room is the car isn't always at home. Using it as storage for the home is fine if I don't need the car or there is a stable schedule of when I use it.
 

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You sound like you work for an electric utility (I do) :)

I'd like to see these things too, but the battery has a limited number of charge / discharge cycles and GM has no incentive to make it easier to use that limited capacity to do things besides pushing the car down the road.
 

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The 2016 Volt will have the stock 3.3 kW onboard charger so if you want a 6.6 kW charger, you have to manufacturer it by yourself, or expect to buy an aftermarket unit because GM will not do it.
 

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I just don't understand the perceived benefit of using the Volt (or any car, really) as an energy storage device for my home. Aside from the one time in every 2-3 YEARS that my electricity goes out for longer than 5 hours (the approximate time it takes for the ice cream in my freezer to melt), what's the point?
o If I store power for peak times (around here that's mid-to-late afternoon in the summer), the car's at work. Talk about needing a long extension cord!
o If I use up the power in my car's battery, how do I travel anywhere? (yeah, I know, the Volt's got an engine. but see the next point)
o Where is this power coming from, anyway? The grid? The engine? In the case of the former, I'd lose 20-30% (or more? EEs, help me out, here) in converting from AC to DC and back again. In the case of the latter, we all know that gas engines are only 30% efficient to begin with, right?
So, is there any real-life benefit to this, or is this all just an academic exercise?
 

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I just don't understand the perceived benefit of using the Volt (or any car, really) as an energy storage device for my home. Aside from the one time in every 2-3 YEARS that my electricity goes out for longer than 5 hours (the approximate time it takes for the ice cream in my freezer to melt), what's the point?
o If I store power for peak times (around here that's mid-to-late afternoon in the summer), the car's at work. Talk about needing a long extension cord!
o If I use up the power in my car's battery, how do I travel anywhere? (yeah, I know, the Volt's got an engine. but see the next point)
o Where is this power coming from, anyway? The grid? The engine? In the case of the former, I'd lose 20-30% (or more? EEs, help me out, here) in converting from AC to DC and back again. In the case of the latter, we all know that gas engines are only 30% efficient to begin with, right?
So, is there any real-life benefit to this, or is this all just an academic exercise?
Agreed. My power was out for 6 hours recently thanks to a drunk driver in a stolen car crashing into the power pole. That'd be the first time it's been out longer than 2 minutes in my lifetime at all homes I've ever lived in.
 

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I've got something better than my Volt for emergency power: a 20Kw natural-gas powered standby generator. We're exposed to Gulf Coast hurricanes and were without power last time for 13 days. Best money I ever spent on my home.
 
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