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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
OK, after Scott's 5,000 mile Tesla trip and Lagodaboy wandering all over CA in his Bolt, I decided to venture outside the Chicago metro area this weekend to attend a wedding in Cedar Rapids, IA area, a 460 some mile round trip. With no DC fast chargers along the route, I used some public L2 charge stations instead. We traveled tollway/highway at 60 MPH (cruise control) with A/C for 95% of the trip. With a one-way distance of 223 miles, I could likely have made it without stopping, but I did not want to cut it that close in case of unforeseen circumstances.

So we stopped in Port Byron, IL (pop. 1600) on the Mississippi river separating IL from IA. There is a L2 station (non-networked) in a parking lot conveniently located across the street from a restaurant / bar called Tuggers (tug boats ply the river). Nice place, enjoyed eating on their outside deck overlooking the river. Great selection of craft beers, burgers, etc. and a very friendly staff. The free 22 mile charge while we ate lunch was more about adding some extra cushion miles, just in case.

We arrived at our hotel with about 50 miles to spare and plugged into free L2 charging (ChargePoint) in a shopping area parking deck. The station added another 25 miles while we were getting ready for the wedding. Returning from the wedding, we plugged in overnight and had a full battery by 7:30 AM. Took some other guests to the airport, returned to hotel, plugged in and added more battery miles while packing and checking out.


Stopped at Tuggers on the way back (we liked it the day before), added about 30 miles while we had lunch and ducked the rain pouring down. Then returned home with over 50 miles to spare, exactly what I wanted. No range anxiety.

My wife initially wanted to take the Volt, concerned about charging opportunities. But I talked her into a little adventure and it all worked out perfectly. :)

Port Byron station across from Tuggers, Iowa ChargePoint station by hotel.

Port Byron, IL Charge Station 1.jpg Port Byron, IL Charge Station 2.jpg Quarry Rd  Parking Ceck Charge Station.jpg
 

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How far out of your way would have had to drive to find another L2 charging station if the L2 charging station at Tuggers was ICEd or out of service?
 

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How far out of your way would have had to drive to find another L2 charging station if the L2 charging station at Tuggers was ICEd or out of service?
Like he said in the point, "likely would have made it without the stop".
 

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I'm glad it worked out well, but you were a rolling road hazard running 5 to 10 MPH below the posted speed limit most of the way, and very likely 10 to 15 MPH slower than traffic as a result. Interstate accident rates go up as the speed differential between low and high speeds increases. It looks like the shorter and slower US 30 would have been the more appropriate route in this case.

Sorry, but the rural areas of middle America is simply not non-Tesla EV ready. What you did was reinforce the gas guzzling public's perception that EVs are slow.
 

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I'm glad it worked out well, but you were a rolling road hazard running 5 to 10 MPH below the posted speed limit most of the way, and very likely 10 to 15 MPH slower than traffic as a result. Interstate accident rates go up as the speed differential between low and high speeds increases. It looks like the shorter and slower US 30 would have been the more appropriate route in this case.

Sorry, but the rural areas of middle America is simply not non-Tesla EV ready. What you did was reinforce the gas guzzling public's perception that EVs are slow.
Oh please! There is nothing wrong with running at or just below the speed limit. I get the safety issue, but it's the guys running 10-20 over the limit that create that situation.

And Tesla's get better range at higher speed???
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
How far out of your way would have had to drive to find another L2 charging station if the L2 charging station at Tuggers was ICEd or out of service?
I had two other L2's pre-selected as alternatives. They were across the river in Davenport and on the way to my destination so at most 5 or so miles out of the way. Same coming back, I could have stopped at Northern IL U in Dekalb if the one by Tuggers was being used. I used PlugShare to find the stations before the trip, and the app was helpful finding the one by the hotel.

By the way, at my first stop at Tuggers I found a Red G2 Volt parked next to my Bolt when I came out. So I plugged them in when I left.

I applaud this little village for putting in a station, I would never have passed through (twice) otherwise. But I suspect they would get more EV visitors if they put in another one. Being non-networked, some people may not take the chance the unit is occupied or out of order. So having a second makes it a safer bet as a charge destination.
 

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Oh please! There is nothing wrong with running at or just below the speed limit. I get the safety issue, but it's the guys running 10-20 over the limit that create that situation.

And Tesla's get better range at higher speed???
Anyone running 10-15 MPH below the average speed of traffic is a rolling road hazard, regardless of what they're driving, 2, 4, 6, or even 18 wheels. This is one of the things drivers' education courses used to teach - drive with the flow of traffic for safety reasons.

Teslas don't get better range - they have a much better charging infrastructure along our Interstate system which means they can drive the flow of traffic and still find high speed charging stations along the way. I-80 in particular has a lot of Tesla supercharger stops along the way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
How far was the shopping area parking deck from the hotel?
It was a very short walk across a plaza and next to the hotel's own parking structure (no charging). So, a convenient walk. This was in Coralville which looks like a brand new mixed use development/city. Reminded me of National Harbor, MD outside D.C.
 

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It was a very short walk across a plaza and next to the hotel's own parking structure (no charging). So, a convenient walk. This was in Coralville which looks like a brand new mixed use development/city. Reminded me of National Harbor, MD outside D.C.
It sounds like you had good luck all around.
 

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Anyone running 10-15 MPH below the average speed of traffic is a rolling road hazard, regardless of what they're driving, 2, 4, 6, or even 18 wheels. This is one of the things drivers' education courses used to teach - drive with the flow of traffic for safety reasons.

Teslas don't get better range - they have a much better charging infrastructure along our Interstate system which means they can drive the flow of traffic and still find high speed charging stations along the way. I-80 in particular has a lot of Tesla supercharger stops along the way.
Your trying to tell me that around Denver the 18 wheelers drive the speed limit over the mountains? Most of the rental cars can't even do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'm glad it worked out well, but you were a rolling road hazard running 5 to 10 MPH below the posted speed limit most of the way, and very likely 10 to 15 MPH slower than traffic as a result. Interstate accident rates go up as the speed differential between low and high speeds increases. It looks like the shorter and slower US 30 would have been the more appropriate route in this case.
Minimum speed was 45. Much of the trip was 3 lanes. Someone who is compelled to go 75 or 80 can do it in the left lanes, I wasn't stopping them at all. Doing 60 in the right lane was not an issue except in your mind. There were many cars in front of me also doing 60. Also some trucks pulling boats, RV's etc. doing slower than me that I had to pass. I suppose they where all "wrong" as well? :)

Sorry, but the rural areas of middle America is simply not non-Tesla EV ready. What you did was reinforce the gas guzzling public's perception that EVs are slow.
Right, just like I'm now never buying a boat or RV or truck, because they were slower than me on the road. :)

I made it in the same time I would have had I taken the Volt and run it on gas. Perhaps you are thinking I'm normally a 85 MPH speed monster except when driving the Bolt? haha, no, I drive 60 in the Volt as well. Did it with the Cadillac SRX too.

I agree the EV infrastructure is not as developed as some some other places. But the fact a little tiny town (and others along the way) had a charge station shows this is changing. The hotel I stayed at had 6 EV parking spots. The Cedar Rapids airport had a bank as well (free for 1st 20 minutes). When I bought my Volt in 2011, none of these existed. I was so focused on DC fast charging (there really aren't any non-Tesla for this trip) that I overlooked the usefulness of L2.

Would I take the Bolt on a 5000 mile (+ 500, lol) trip? No. I don't take those by car anyway. This trip to neighboring states is more likely for me, but even these are rare compared to the car's main use: commuting.
 

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Anyone running 10-15 MPH below the average speed of traffic is a rolling road hazard, regardless of what they're driving, 2, 4, 6, or even 18 wheels. This is one of the things drivers' education courses used to teach - drive with the flow of traffic for safety reasons.
Nonsense. When I drove through the mountains on I-5 between Redding and Grant's Pass bringing my just purchased TR7 back from Sacramento I was limited to 50 mph because of severe vibration over 52 mph due to tires. I would pass all the semi's going up the hills and they would pass me going down. They can't go more than 45 mph going up the hills. There are drivers that like to stick to the speed limit and those that like to do 5-10 over. I have done both. That's what left and right hand lanes are for.
 

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Great thread.
Interesting to see this done in a Bolt too.
Thanks for posting it.
 

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Would I take the Bolt on a 5000 mile (+ 500, lol) trip?
RE: attend a wedding in Cedar Rapids, IA area, a 460 some mile round trip
haha, you short changed me more miles than your entire trip was :)

Curious if you used any route planners? Using this one (https://abetterrouteplanner.com/) with the Bolt specified indicates you could make it without a charging stop if you drive 60 MPH but if you drive 65 MPH then you would be required to stop to charge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
RE: attend a wedding in Cedar Rapids, IA area, a 460 some mile round trip
haha, you short changed me more miles than your entire trip was :)

Curious if you used any route planners? Using this one (https://abetterrouteplanner.com/) with the Bolt specified indicates you could make it without a charging stop if you drive 60 MPH but if you drive 65 MPH then you would be required to stop to charge.
The route planner was me, haha. Yes, I likely could have done it without a stop, but being cautious (and hungry) I stopped and charged and ate.
 

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The route planner was me, haha. Yes, I likely could have done it without a stop, but being cautious (and hungry) I stopped and charged and ate.
It depends how you travel. When by myself I stop off at McDonald's grab an egg McMuffin and I'm off again in 15 minutes or less or for lunch grab a chocolate shake and I'm good for the rest of the day, no time to charge. Travel with my sister and it's no fast food for her, grab a seat in a restaurant, wait for waitress to come around, order bacon and eggs, wait for 20 minutes for it to come, eat then back on the road, elapsed time closer to an hour, lots of time to charge and don't get me started on lunch.
 

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Nice. It really is great to be able to leave the Volt behind. At this point, I have one expensive paperweight.

I'm probably going to do a video on the Bolt EV's ideal speed (for efficiency) based on charger availability. It's possible to do over 500 miles a day only on Level 2 AC (assuming you start the day with a full charge), but you'd be driving all day to get less than half as far as you would with DCFC in the same amount of time. If you want to drive all day using only L2, you'd need to keep the speed to around 45 mph. If you just need to reach a destination and can deal with the attrition, a 60 mph speed should be fine. In the Bolt EV, that would be good for over 4 mi/kWh.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If you want to drive all day using only L2, you'd need to keep the speed to around 45 mph. If you just need to reach a destination and can deal with the attrition, a 60 mph speed should be fine. In the Bolt EV, that would be good for over 4 mi/kWh.
I did note that the DIC green leaf was half in and half out of the efficiency sweet spot at 60 with the AC on. Dropping to 55 put it firmly in the bull's eye, but 60 was fine.
 
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